almediah.fr
» » Somebody's Daughter

Download Somebody's Daughter eBook

by Marie G. Lee

Download Somebody's Daughter eBook
ISBN:
0807083887
Author:
Marie G. Lee
Category:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Beacon Pr (April 15, 2005)
Pages:
264 pages
EPUB book:
1969 kb
FB2 book:
1259 kb
DJVU:
1548 kb
Other formats
docx txt rtf lrf
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
867


Somebody's Daughter is that rare book, that rare page-turner, the one you cannot put down, the one you will suspend washing the . I just finished reading Somebody's Daughter, by Marie Myung-Ok Lee, and it was amazing. What a beautifully-written, honest book

Somebody's Daughter is that rare book, that rare page-turner, the one you cannot put down, the one you will suspend washing the laundry for or cooking breakfast for. It is the novel you will open and read in one urgent breath as you take in the storyteller's compelling tale of lives felt long after the book's end as you turn off the light to sleep. What a beautifully-written, honest book. It was truly one of those books where I felt as if I'd stepped into someone else's life for a little while, and was able to personally experience some of Sarah and her birth mother's life.

Praise for Marie Myung-Ok Lee’s Somebody’s Daughter. Somebody’s Daughter is that rare book, that rare page-turner, the one you cannot put down, the one you will suspend washing the laundry for or cooking breakfast for. It is the novel you will open and read in one urgent breath as you take in the storyteller’s compelling tale of lives felt long after the book’s end as you turn off the light to sleep. LOIS-ANN YAMANAKA, author of Wild Meat and the Bully Burgers.

Somebody's Daughter is the story of nineteen-year-old Sarah Thorson, who was adopted as a baby by a Lutheran .

Somebody's Daughter is the story of nineteen-year-old Sarah Thorson, who was adopted as a baby by a Lutheran couple in the Midwest. Marie Myung-Ok Lee, author of three young adult novels, including Finding My Voice and Saying Goodbye, has received many honors for her writing, among them an O. Henry honorable mention, and both Best Book for Young Adults and Best Book for Reluctant Readers citations from the American Library Association.

Somebody’s Daughter is the story of nineteen-year-old Sarah Thorson, who was adopted as a baby by a Lutheran .

Somebody’s Daughter is the story of nineteen-year-old Sarah Thorson, who was adopted as a baby by a Lutheran couple in the Midwest. After dropping out of college, she decides to study in Korea and becomes more and more intrigued by her Korean heritage, eventually embarking on a crusade to find her birth mother.

Marie Myung-Ok Lee. The last sensation from the awake-world is my limbs seizing like a jerked marionette as I pass into the deepest stages of sleep. But this time, the dream is different. She is sitting in a slow-moving trainlike vehicle, maybe the Small World ride at Disneyland. Her neck is craning like crazy; she’s going to meet someone, but is seized by a sudden anxiousness that she’s gotten the time or location wrong. Another train is going the other way. In it are two girls, who catch her eye and wave. I’m Sarah, says one, in a Barbie-doll voice

Adopted and raised by n parents in Minnesota, a Korean teenager returns to her native country to find her mother.

Adopted and raised by n parents in Minnesota, a Korean teenager returns to her native country to find her mother. I ask only once a year: please help the Internet Archive today.

Somebody's Daughter book. A heartwarming and heartbreaking story of a Korean American.

Marie G. Lee, American Writer. Lee"s novel, Somebody"s Daughter (2005), is based on her year as a Fulbright Scholar to South of Korea, taking oral histories of Korean birth mothers. Avocations: Tae kown do, skiing, rollerblading. She has been involved in the adoptee community for many years, but Lee herself is not adopted.

Somebody's Daughter" is tremendous in its unflinching portrayal of Korea, adoption, the relationships between mothers and daughters, and the relationship to one's self. Lee's prose is gorgeous, poetic, precise, and compelling. I finished this book in one sitting and was left breathless at the end. Lee's talent as a writer is evident in all aspects of this book.

Lee has been a Yaddo, MacDowell Colony, and VCCA fellow has served as a National Book Award judge and has taught fiction writing at Yale University. She is a founder and former Board President of the Asian American Writers' Workshop. She currently teaches at Brown University, and she is an adjunct professor at Columbia University, where she teaches creative writing  .

An adopted girl raised by a Lutheran couple in Minnesota returns to Korea for a semester studying abroad in college and finds herself caught up in the search for her birth mother and a sincere effort to reclaim her heritage. 10,000 first printing.
  • Hadadel
I think you need a category for informational. I don't know much about the Korean culture and it opened my eyes to the struggle of the main character to find her roots and I learnd a lot about their culture.
  • Uranneavo
This book was a good read. It does not claim to be representative of the experiences of all Korean adoptees, their birthmothers, or their families. An author cannot reasonably be expected to have personally experienced the roles of all of the diverse characters in her novel to write about them credibly. I agree that research is important, in order to write a convincing story, but how much research is really enough, especially given the wide differences in perspectives among the various groups of individuals represented by the characters in the book? Seems as if some of the reviewers are holding her to an unrealistically high standard of researching the adoption experience from the perspective of the adoptee when all she was doing was developing one character who, in my opinion, "hung together" very well. Perhaps Sarah is difficult for some Korean adoptees (and their parents) to relate to, but the author is not required to present a "generic" adoptee. The truth is that there are a lot of international, interracial adoptees who have major identity issues and have not simply faded into middle America. I thought the novel did a masterful job of presenting a myriad of different perspectives on adoption and adoptees, not just those of the main characters. Kudos to the author.
  • huckman
Interesting story that also gives a glimpse of life for the ordinary person in Korea. I did not understand her feelings about her adoptive parents.
  • Vit
I just finished reading Somebody's Daughter, by Marie Myung-Ok Lee, and it was amazing. What a beautifully-written, honest book.

It was truly one of those books where I felt as if I'd stepped into someone else's life for a little while, and was able to personally experience some of Sarah and her birth mother's life.

To be able to write such a book is a gift.

Lee doesn't sentimentalize the idea of international adoption -- she faces it head-on, with a sense of truth and honesty and reality. So often, all we see are the cute babies from abroad with their glowing new parents, but the story of how that happens can be a tragic or difficult one. And the story of what happens later can also be difficult.

Lee deftly handles both stories, and weaves together the saga of Sarah's birth mother, and Sarah herself, and how their lives parallel and where they go in different directions.

The ending was a surprise, and after I thought about it, quite appropriate in many ways.

It's not only a great book purely from the standpoint of a good read, but it has particular resonance for anyone affected by adoption -- whether a birth mother, an adopted child, or parent of an adopted child.

I highly recommend this book.
  • Thozius
The reviews for this are all over the place! Personally, I loved this book! I thought it was well written and I got involved with the characters! And it ended exactly as it should have! A great read!
  • Мох
I enjoyed this book overall but was somewhat frustrated with the main character, Sarah, throughout. I'm not an adoptee, nor am I Korean, so I can't comment on that experience. However, Sarah's emotional response to the story's events just weren't always believable. Her extreme ambivalence toward her white adoptive family didn't always ring true, and her connection to Korea seemed to be at one end or the other of a wide ranging spectrum. She resents her adoptive family, yet the idea of returning to Korea never occurred to her? Sarah also seemed very immature, more like a 16 year old than a college student. I most enjoyed the portions written about (SPOILER) Sarah's birth mother. I sympathized the most with her character, and I liked reading about Korean culture from the perspective of a Korean.

And here's something that bothered me throughout. Sarah comes from the Minnesota town of Eden Prairie. Throughout the book, this is spelled EDEN'S PRAIRIE. Whether this is the author's mistake or the publisher's, I don't know. But I just kept thinking, the author got a Fulbright to travel to Korea to interview birth mothers, but she couldn't flip open an atlas to get the name of a town right?