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Download Island of the Sequined Love Nun eBook

by Christopher Moore

Download Island of the Sequined Love Nun eBook
ISBN:
038097505X
Author:
Christopher Moore
Category:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
William Morrow; 1st edition (August 1, 1997)
Pages:
336 pages
EPUB book:
1361 kb
FB2 book:
1525 kb
DJVU:
1352 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
544


Home Christopher Moore Island of the Sequined Love Nu. As he turned, he caught sight of the navigator, hanging uncon. scious a few feet away.

Home Christopher Moore Island of the Sequined Love Nun. Home. Island of the sequined . .Island of the Sequined Love Nun, .

Island of the Sequined Love Nun is a novel by American absurdist writer Christopher Moore, published in 1997. It is based partly on the author's personal experiences in Micronesia. Tucker Case (Tuck), is a pilot for a cosmetics company, who crashes the company plane while having sex. This event causes Tuck to be blacklisted from flying in the United States, so he accepts a lucrative offer from a doctor-missionary on a remote Micronesian island to transport cargo to and from the island and Japan.

As he turned, he caught sight of the navigator, hanging uncon.

Island of the sequined .

com Barnes & Noble. Take a wonderfully crazed excursion into the demented heart of a tropical paradise - a world of cargo cults, cannibals, mad scientists, ninjas, and talking fruit bats. Our bumbling hero is Tucker Case, a hopeless geek trapped in a cool guys body, who makes a living as a pilot for the Mary Jean Cosmetics Corporation. But when he demolishes his bosss pink plane during a drunken airborne liaison, Tuck must run for his life from Mary Jeans goons.

The protagonist of Island of the Sequined Love Nun is a colossal screw-up pilot, Tucker Case

The protagonist of Island of the Sequined Love Nun is a colossal screw-up pilot, Tucker Case. Tucker is a well-developed character and his moments of self-reflection have some real depth to them. Tucker is a screw-up with a moral sense. I want to trumpet that "Christopher Moore has done it again!" but that would be somewhat out of place since this book was released a while ago so the technical explanation of the quality of this book would be more like "Christopher Moore does it for the first or second time!". I have to say, after reading this book, that I am finally unashamed to say that I am a Christopher Moore fan.

Genres : Humorous, Fantasy. Pilot Tucker Case has a weakness-well, Tuck really has two-and the combination of drinking and sex in the cockpit of the pink Mary Jean Cosmetics Learjet puts him on the front page of papers all over the planet

Genres : Humorous, Fantasy. Pilot Tucker Case has a weakness-well, Tuck really has two-and the combination of drinking and sex in the cockpit of the pink Mary Jean Cosmetics Learjet puts him on the front page of papers all over the planet. But he finds another job with a mysterious employer-someone with a brand-new Lear 45- who's willing to pay Tuck generously and ask no questions about his record. The jet and job are on Alualu, a speck in the Pacific Ocean, and Tucker has nowhere else to go.

ISLAND OF THE SEQUINED LOVE NUN CHRISTOPHER MOORE PART ONE The Phoenix 1 The Cannibal Tree Tucker Case awoke to find himself hanging from a breadfruit tree by a coconut fiber rope. He was suspended facedown about six feet above the sand in some sort of harness, his hands and feet tied together in front of him. He lifted his head and strained to look around. He could see a white sand beach fringed with coconut palms, a coconut husk fire, a palm frond hut, a path of white. Island of the sequined love nun. Christopher moore. Part one. The Phoenix.

Infobox Book name Island of the Sequined Love Nun title orig . Christopher Moore Author Christopher Moore signing a copy of Bite Me at Politics Prose in Washington, DC. Born 1 January 1957.

Infobox Book name Island of the Sequined Love Nun title orig translator . Moore borrowed the title of one of the chapters of the novel from a short story he had written in 1987,. Мур, Кристофер - Кристофер Мур У этого термина существуют и другие зн. икипедия.

A pilot for the Mary Jean Cosmetics Corporation a hopeless geek trapped in a cool guy& body Tucker Case& troubles begin one very drunk morning at the Seattle airport Holiday Inn Lounge. Surrendering to the strident will of a call girl who wants desperately to join the Mile High Club, he proceeds to crash his shocking pink jet on the runway totaling the plane and seriously damaging the organ that got him into this mess in the first place

PART ONE The Phoenix. It certainly seemed legitimate. The doctor was on a remote island north of New Guinea, and he needed someone to fly jet loads of medical supplies to the natives.

PART ONE The Phoenix. Tucker Case awoke to find himself hanging from a breadfruit tree by a coconut fiber rope. He specifically mentioned that "he was not concerned" about Tucker's lack of a pilot's license. The "need was dire" and the need was for an experienced jet pilot who could fly a Lear 45.

A pilot for the Mary Jean Cosmetics Corporation--a hopeless geek trapped in a cool guy's body--Tucker Case's troubles begin one very drunk morning at the Seattle airport Holiday Inn Lounge. Surrendering to the strident will of a call girl who wants desperately to join the Mile High Club, he proceeds to crash his shocking pink jet on the runway--totaling the plane and seriously damaging the organ that got him into this mess in the first place. Now, with his flying license revoked, his job and manhood demolished, facing a possible prison term or, worse, the murderous wrath of Mary Jean Dobbins and her corporate goons, Tuck has to run for his life toward the only employment opportunity left for him: piloting a Lear jet for a shady medical missionary and a sexy, naturally blond High Priestess on the remotest of Micronesian island hells.

But first he has to get there, encountering spies, cannibals, journalists, and would-be bitch goddesses every step of the way. Traveling with his Filipino transvestite navigator and a fruit bat companion, Roberto, Tuck braves shark-infested waters and a typhoon before reaching the dark heart of a tropical paradise--all before his first day of work.

A delightfully offbeat look at cargo cults, religious zeal, and pyramid schemes, Island of the Sequined Love Nun is Christopher Moore at his hilarious best.

  • Kelerius
“Island of the Sequined Love Nun” is great for reading with your toes in the sand, the ocean pounding on the shore, and the sun beating down on you. It will add to the atmosphere. It is an earlier work of Christopher Moore and is humorous, but not laugh out loud vulgar like some of his more recent books. I prefer this. The text is also very fast paced. In fact it reads like an action adventure novel at times.
The protagonist of “Island of the Sequined Love Nun” is a colossal screw-up pilot, Tucker Case. Tucker is a well-developed character and his moments of self-reflection have some real depth to them. Tucker is a screw-up with a moral sense. There is right and wrong in his life, even if he does not always live up to its standards. There are some caricatures in the text also, but it creates a nice working mix to the cast of characters. One of my personal favorites is the old cannibal Sarapul. This character demonstrates how good Moore is at slipping slang into a character’s speech that is not at all realistic, but boy is it funny.
Religion and what constitutes faith is a key component in the book, and Moore seems to be mocking both (a little) and celebrating them (a lot). Pulling off that hat trick makes for great satire. And it gives this work some of its better moments.
I believe this is one of Moore’s stronger efforts. There are few to no slow moments. The ending is not great, but it works. “Island of the Sequined Love Nun” is clever, and there are not many books out there that examine cargo cults, faith, and sex in quite the manner this text does. Enjoy it.
  • Kardana
The protagonist of the story, Tucker "Tuck" Case, who is a pilot and not exactly the brightest bulb on the planet, is also dealing with low self-esteem issues. Before the story settles down on a remote, Pacific island named Alualu, it is littered with quite a few colorful, characters. Through a series of misadventures Tuck eventually winds up on the dinky island. The place is inhabited by a modern medical building, an airstrip, two odd "missionaries," six Japanese guards, over three-hundred natives called the Shark People and a talking fruit bat. Oh, and I almost forgot, a very old cannibal named Sarapul. If that isn't strange enough, there's a god called Vincent who the natives worship.

Mr. Moore reminds me of a literary version of the famed Coen Brothers who have created such odd, funny movies as "Fargo" and "The Big Lebowski." I find the author's works very enjoyable simply because it's impossible to know how the story is going to unfold. Pretty much, it's the sky's the limit in Mr. Moore's hilarious novels. There is no taboo he isn't willing to skewer. Heck, I don't even assume that the main protagonist will not be killed somewhere in the middle of the story. The first two-thirds of this rollicking adventure is shrouded in the mystery as to why Tuck's faults are suited so well for being the island's pilot. The last third is wondering how it will be resolved.

The book had me laughing on page one and kept it up for the entire work. Mr. Moore certainly has a gift for colorful, hilarious prose. The author has become one of my go-to writers if I'm in urgent need of a light read that is chockfull of laughs. If you've never read a Christopher Moore novel, his fourth work is as good a place to start as any.
  • Cargahibe
I want to trumpet that "Christopher Moore has done it again!" but that would be somewhat out of place since this book was released a while ago so the technical explanation of the quality of this book would be more like "Christopher Moore does it for the first or second time!".

I have to say, after reading this book, that I am finally unashamed to say that I am a Christopher Moore fan. I suppose I should be, since this is the fifth or sixth book of his that I have absolutely devoured in the way that is hard to do after having the fun sucked out of a lot of reading because of graduate studies in English. It was this past and my own literary snobbish that didn't want to be a Christopher Moore fan. His books are marketed so that his audience is the same kind of clever woman that reads Tom Robbins books (another author I have an fraught relationship with). I mean, this book has a bright pink cover, one that screams "The man reading this has obvious feminine qualities. When he watches the Harry Potter movies he wants to be Granger, not Potter," and things of the sort. But I have no shame. Moore makes me want more.

I'll gloss on the plot: Tucker Case is a pilot with a past, and a future. After burning out as the personal air chauffeur of a Mary Kay stand-in, he is engaged as a jet pilot for a missionary couple on a Pacific island with a suspiciously large amount of money. Mysteries are solved, laughs are had, and freedom is sought. We also get to have a look at cargo cults and shark hunts. I won't be able to do it justice: you should probably just read the book.
  • Shalizel
Sir Terry Pratchett is probably the best humorist / satirist in the world, but Christopher Moore is definitely the best American humorist / satirist writing today. And honestly, I think in a lot of ways, Christopher Moore is outclassing Sir Pratchett. (That's seriously high praise coming from me -- I dearly love almost all of Pratchett's books.)

I find Christopher Moore's early books to be delightful, light, and fun. They're silly and strange and delightful. His more recent books are also very funny, but much more sophisticated and substantial. It's the difference between pudding and creme brulee -- both are very tasty treats, but the latter has a touch of class and respectability.

Like most of his early books, Sequined Love Nun is very well written and clever, but it is also a bit silly. Light and fun fare for everybody. His more recent books, however, (A Dirty Job, Lamb, Fool and Sacre Bleu) are delightful reading for the more serious reader. If you want to introduce yourself to Christopher Moore, start with the silly (Sequined Love Nun, Bloodsucking Fiends, Practical Demonkeeping...). When you are ready for the sublime, treat yourself to A Dirty Job. It will knock your stripey socks off.