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Download A Sport and a Pastime: A Novel eBook

by James Salter

Download A Sport and a Pastime: A Novel eBook
ISBN:
0865472106
Author:
James Salter
Category:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
North Point Press; Reprint edition (October 1, 1985)
Pages:
192 pages
EPUB book:
1510 kb
FB2 book:
1440 kb
DJVU:
1955 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.8
Votes:
645


A Sport and a Pastime (1967) is a novel by the American writer James Salter.

A Sport and a Pastime (1967) is a novel by the American writer James Salter. Set in France in the early 1960s, the sad and tender story concerns the erotic affair of American middle-class college drop-out Philip Dean and a young French girl, Anne-Marie, as witnessed by a self-consciously unreliable narrator

James Salter was the celebrated author of six novels (The Hunters, 1957; The Arm of Flesh, 1961; A Sport and a Pastime, 1967; Light Years, 1975; Solo Faces, 1979; and All That Is, 2013) and three books of stories (Dusk an. .

James Salter was the celebrated author of six novels (The Hunters, 1957; The Arm of Flesh, 1961; A Sport and a Pastime, 1967; Light Years, 1975; Solo Faces, 1979; and All That Is, 2013) and three books of stories (Dusk and Other Stories, 1988; Last Night, 2005; and Collected Stories, 2013), as well a memoir, Burning the Days (1997). Born in New Jersey in 1926 and raised in New York City, he attended West Point during World War II and served as an officer and a fighter pilot in the . Air Force from 1945 to 1957

A Sport and a Pastime book. Salter's story explores love, voyeurism, youth and impermanence. It examines the kaleidoscope of cruelties and imbalances that exist in relationships.

A Sport and a Pastime book. It shows the oh-so-relatable struggle to find the ingredients for a happy life.

The hills close in and run beside us as we begin slowly to move away from the city.

James Salter A SPORT AND A PASTIME A Novel Remember that the life of this world is but a sport and a pastim. Koran, LVII19 SEPTEMBER. IT SEEMS THESE luminous days will never end. The city, which was almost empty during August, now is filling up again. It is being replenished. The restaurants are all reopening, the shops. The hills close in and run beside us as we begin slowly to move away from the city.

Электронная книга "A Sport and a Pastime: A Novel", James Salter. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "A Sport and a Pastime: A Novel" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

James Salter (1925–2015) was a novelist, short story writer, and screenwriter. His novel A Sport and a Pastime (1967) was hailed by the New York Times as nearly perfect as any American fiction. Salter grew up in New York City and was a career officer and air force pilot until his mid-30s, when the success of his first novel (The Hunters, 1957) led to a full-time writing career. Salter’s potent, lyrical prose earned him acclaim from critics, readers, and fellow novelists. Библиографические данные. A Sport and a Pastime: A Novel. Open Road Media, 2012.

James Salter; Introduction by Reynolds Price. James Salter was the celebrated author of six novels (The Hunters, 1957; The Arm of Flesh, 1961; A Sport and a Pastime, 1967; Light Years, 1975; Solo Faces, 1979; and All That Is, 2013) and three books of stories (Dusk and Other Stories, 1988; Last Night, 2005; and Collected Stories, 2013), as well a memoir, Burning the Days (1997). He also had a successful Hollywood career, most notably as the screenwriter of Downhill Racer (1969)

A Sport and a Pastime. Beautiful and haunting, A Sport and a Pastime is one of the first great American novels to speak frankly of human desire and the yearning for passion free of guilt and shame

A Sport and a Pastime. Author: James Salter. Publisher: Open Road Media, New York, 2012. A tour de force of erotic realism, a romantic cliff-hanger; an opaline vision of Americans in Franc.A Sport and a Pastime succeeds as art must. It tells us about ourselves. Beautiful and haunting, A Sport and a Pastime is one of the first great American novels to speak frankly of human desire and the yearning for passion free of guilt and shame. This ebook features an illustrated biography of James Salter including rare photos from the author’s personal collection. Best viewed with CoolReader.

It’s like an empty railroad car with its bleak line of booths, its tables in the rear. The light of late afternoon fills it, the provincial calm. The patron is playing dominoes with a friend. e, the day behind her, she walks. e, the day behind her, she walks back to where I am sitting and mechanically extends her hand. A single, downward shake which we are embarrassed by. Bonjour, she says quietly. She sits with her eyes lowered, the bare table between us. It seems that the day is very white at the doorway, the white of clouded water. The traffic moves by without noise

Keep James Salter’s A Sport and a Pastime on your shelf, but make room for Maggie Nelson’s The Argonauts next to it. Let’s have new work that questions the old. Things can only get sexier from here.

Keep James Salter’s A Sport and a Pastime on your shelf, but make room for Maggie Nelson’s The Argonauts next to it. a gift for making a physical world that is very naturally imbued with rich metaphorical meaning. Borough Press has scooped a debut novel by British author Joe Mungo Reed, described as "dazzling" by his professor George Saunders. Borough snaps up Saunders' protégé for 'dazzling' debut The Bookseller.

A Sport and a Pastime is an astonishing performance, the classic novel from a remarkable writer whose sentences bristle with a singular passion. Salter chronicles a love affair between a young shopgirl and an American college dropout against the backdrop of provincial France. The narrator's cool distillation of events-real or imagined-makes the book both lyrical and tightly, dangerously pitched.
  • Rolorel
I ordered this book after seeing it listed as one of Esquire's "100 books every guy should read" or some other such hyperbole, and the plot description on that listing made it sound intriguing. I'd never heard of James Salter, to be honest. So this was a shot-in-the-dark sort of purchase, and I'm glad I made it.

"A Sport and a Pastime" is about the brief romance between Philip Dean, a college drop-out, and Anne-Marie, a young French girl, in the early Sixties. It's also about the narrator, unnamed and unreliable (he imagines many things that he couldn't have seen actually play out, unless he was in the room with the young lovers). That's kind of the hook of the novel; the way in which we construct stories, based on scant information. Could be that events between Philip and Anne-Marie in no way resemble what the narrator thinks; there's an undercurrent of erotic fixation here on the narrator's part that, as Reynolds Price suggests in the introduction, could be because of either the male or female protagonist. The opening chapters set the tone (they're a little over-reliant on description in some ways, but as the novel progresses it's evident that the narrator is trying to set the scene for the events that take place). We see a relationship unfold, through the narrator's (admittedly imaginary) eyes, that is erotically charged and perhaps doomed from the start, either because Philip can't take Anne-Marie seriously or he won't.

The description of some of the more intimate scenes as being like a "fever dream" is appropriate, both because we're relying on the narrator to provide them (he and his fervid imagination) and because they document a sexuality between the two lovers that doesn't rest solely on the clichés of previous fictions. It's a romance that's more about the physical intimacy than the emotional connection (and indeed, that emotional connection might be only on Anne-Marie's side, if the narrator is to be believed). I can't get away from the fact that, to me, this is as much about the stories we tell, and the art of fiction itself, as the romance it describes. I'm sure smarter people than me have pointed that out before, but this is my first time with the book. And I'm the one writing this review. So there.

An evocative near-masterpiece (I can't give it the full five stars because the opening chapters take their time with descriptions that sometimes border on dull, though I feel the contradiction when I say that later on, that sense of description has helped establish the scene in which the action unfolds), "A Sport and a Pastime" is worth seeking out if you're interested in topics like "the modern-day American novel," or if you just want a good summer read that's not banal. As an item purchased on blind faith, I will say it managed to justify that leap.
  • Shliffiana
This is my first book by Salter, whom I have undertaken as a result of an article about the Hamptons literary crowd I read some time ago. The two authors featured most prominently in that article were Salter and Peter Matthiessen. I also recently read the latter's At Play in the Fields of the Lord. There was evidently a gentle rivalry between the two and, as a matter of comparison, this is by far the superior novel.

The outset gives the impression of revisiting Hemingway in expatriate France. However, that sense quickly dissipates as the narrator relocates to a small town hours outside of Paris. The word on this book is that it's an exemplar of writing sex. Perhaps. It is certainly an exemplar of writing. While explicit sexual episodes feature throughout, they don't, in fact, rank among the best passages.

The fantastic writing aside, the facet of the novel that drove me to internet questing was a seemingly unnecessary reference to Madame Magritte's suicide. After learning about that event, I began to notice a strong Surrealist influence. The narrator casts the whole story as a combination of his dreams and reality. He juxtaposes mild landscapes with sudden pornographic details. He is a photographic artist who claims to a doubting interlocutor to capture his subjects unaltered.

There's not much on the internet about this observation, so perhaps I'm off base. But, in addition to the Magritte reference, there's another one to Dali. Now, the writing here can be breathtakingly good, but I equally enjoyed the effort of picking apart the thematic layer. So, even if I'm stretching the Surrealist point a bit, this book has me thinking of writing an expository essay on the topic. And that alone is high praise.
  • Xtreem
In A SPORT AND A PASTIME, the unnamed narrator is a 33 year-old American photographer who divides his time between Paris and Autun, a small town near Dijon in the center of France. When in Paris, this narrator socializes with the wealthy Wheatlands, who are hard-partying mediocrities. When in Autun, this narrator stays in the Wheatland’s country house, which is his base as he seeks the soul of France through his photography. In chapter 20, he says: “I am making an extraordinary record of this town. I am discovering it, bringing it to light. There are photographs of the house alone, the surfaces of the furniture, the broad doors, reflections in mirrors, that are the most compelling I have ever made. It almost seems the work of a sick man, work of great patience and simplicity. It has a radiance, a tubercular calm… My work begins to seem huge. I will be able to enclose myself in it…”

This observant and articulate narrator is also lonely, a little heavy, and his hair is thinning. Further, he is unable to get to first base with the comely Ms. Claude Picquet, who keeps the narrator at a polite distance as she inadvertently stirs his desire and imagination. In a way, PASTIME is the story of this narrator and his extraordinary sensibility as he copes with his loneliness and sexual frustration. To do so, he imagines the affair of a casual acquaintance named Phillip Dean, who visits a honky-tonk with the narrator one evening. There, they spot the attractive and risk-taking Anne-Marie Costallat, who is at a table with black American soldiers. Phillip, who is 24, then begins to see the 18 year-old Anne-Marie, who is, in the narrator’s rich mind, both innocent and generous in love and an insatiable sexual adventuress. For the most part, PASTIME is the story of this affair, as the narrator imagines this couple in bed and traveling through the villages of France, where the narrator thinks the real France resides.

PASTIME is very hot. At the same time, it’s never lewd or pornographic, probably because the narrator has such an exquisite sensibility. There is plenty of sex. But the sex serves to illuminate the subtle ups-and downs of a relationship and to show how the emotional texture of this imagined affair evolves. The novel is, well, loving, not dirty. Phillip and Anne-Marie, btw, both get their comeuppance.

One final thought from the narrator. “He has already set out on a dazzling voyage which is more like an illness, becoming ever more distant, more legendary. His life will be filled with those daring impulses which cause him to disappear and next be heard of in Dublin, in Veracruz… I am not telling the truth about Dean, I am inventing him. I am creating him out of my own inadequacies…”

Highly recommended.