almediah.fr
» » The Bachelors of Broken Hill: An Inspector Napoleon Bonaparte Mystery

Download The Bachelors of Broken Hill: An Inspector Napoleon Bonaparte Mystery eBook

by Arthur W. Upfield

Download The Bachelors of Broken Hill: An Inspector Napoleon Bonaparte Mystery eBook
ISBN:
0684850583
Author:
Arthur W. Upfield
Category:
World Literature
Language:
English
Publisher:
Touchstone; 1st Scribner Paperback Fiction ed edition (September 14, 1998)
Pages:
254 pages
EPUB book:
1749 kb
FB2 book:
1881 kb
DJVU:
1159 kb
Other formats
rtf mbr lit txt
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
126


Inspector Napoleon Bonaparte mysteries are a challenge to those quick to judge past racial views

Inspector Napoleon Bonaparte mysteries are a challenge to those quick to judge past racial views.

The Bachelors of Broken . .has been added to your Cart. Unlike many of Upfield's other mysteries, this novel-apparently his 19th book in a series of 37-presents Bony working on a case set entirely in a city and relying almost entirely on the abilities he supposedly inherited from his "white" father. In only two scenes do Bony's miraculous tracking skills, characteristic of his mother's Aboriginal people, come very briefly into play

Author Arthur W. Upfield was born in Gosport, Hampshire, England on September 1, 1890. He moved to Australia and adopted it as his homeland. He is best known for his series of books featuring Detective Inspector Napoleon "Bony" Bonaparte of the Queensland State Police

Author Arthur W. He is best known for his series of books featuring Detective Inspector Napoleon "Bony" Bonaparte of the Queensland State Police. He died on February 13, 1964. Библиографические данные. The Bachelors of Broken Hill: An Inspector Bonaparte Mystery featuring Bony, the first Aboriginal detective Inspector Bonaparte Mysteries (Том 14).

Arthur William Upfield (1 September 1890 – 12 February 1964) was an English-Australian writer, best known for his works of detective fiction featuring Detective Inspector Napoleon "Bony" Bonaparte of the Queensland Police Force, a half-cast.

Arthur William Upfield (1 September 1890 – 12 February 1964) was an English-Australian writer, best known for his works of detective fiction featuring Detective Inspector Napoleon "Bony" Bonaparte of the Queensland Police Force, a half-caste Aborigine. His books were the basis for a 1970s Australian television series entitled Boney, as well as a 1990 telemovie and a 1992 spin-off TV series.

Chapter Eighteen: Inspector Bonaparte to Jimmy Nimmo. Other author's books: Madman’s Bend. The Bachelors of Broken Hill. Cake in the Hat Box. Murder Must Wait. Chapter Nineteen: Unprofessional Conduct. Chapter Twenty: To Court a Maid. Broken Hill wasn’t Jimmy’s objective when he left Sydney on completion of a burglary, the planning of which had called for mental concentration over a period of three weeks, and Jimmy had looked forward with keen expectancy to a long holiday.

Arthur William Upfield. THE BACHELORS OF BROKEN HILL - An Inspector Napoleon Bonaparte Mystery. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read.

The Mountains Have a Secret. Inspector Bonaparte Mysteries The Bachelors of Broken Hill: An Inspector Bonaparte Mystery featuring Bony, the first Aboriginal detective. Inspector Bonaparte Mysteries. Część 12. Arthur W. Upfield31 sierpnia 2018. Author Arthur W. The Bachelors of Broken Hill: An Inspector Bonaparte Mystery featuring Bony, the first Aboriginal detective. Część 14. When two elderly bachelors were poisoned with cyanide, a strange woman was on the scene each time - and now she too has disappeared, leaving no trace.

Items related to The Bachelors of Broken Hill . Upfield and Hosking keep listeners guessing until the last minute of this oddly fascinating mystery.

Items related to The Bachelors of Broken Hill (Detective Inspector Napoleon. Arthur Upfield The Bachelors of Broken Hill (Detective Inspector Napoleon Bonaparte). ISBN 13: 9781743182499. Australian Detective Inspector Napoleon Bonaparte (Bony) is a singular character. When elderly bachelors are being poisoned one by one, Bony is sent to Broken Hill to get to the bottom of it. His personality and unconventional methods of detection arouse people's curiosity.

Books related to The Bachelors of Broken Hill. The Murchison Murders.

Two men are killed by cyanide poisoning before Bony comes to Broken Hill to take up the case, and a third dies soon after he arrives. All die in crowded public places, and all are elderly and single. Witnesses recall a woman being near each man before he died, but their descriptions seem to be of entirely different women. Clues are old and witnesses have been mishandled by an inept investigator before Bony arrives in the prosperous mining town, but with the help of the local constabulary, a professional burglar vacationing in Broken Hill, and an amateur quick-sketch artist, Inspector Bonaparte mounts an investigation to identify the murderer before she finds another victim.
  • Super P
Bony mysteries are the best! Great description of 1020's - 1950's Australian life and environments. My late Range Scientist husband loved them and the recordings do not disappoint, a great way to revisit an old friend, Inspector Bonaparte.
  • Munimand
I love all of the Bony detective books!
  • Tamesya
Every Upheld book deserves 5 stars. One gets an education along with Australian bush travel as half breed Bony tracks down the criminal. And what is special is he does it in less than 300 pages without shorting the tale.
  • Dark_Sun
Excellent.
  • Djang
I can't get enough of these stories. I have almost listened to them all. I will be sad and at a loss for something good to listen to as I travel.
  • Jugore
THE BACHELORS OF BROKEN HILL (1950) by Arthur W. Upfield (British-born Australian, 1890-1964) is a Fair-Play Puzzle mystery novel set in Australia and featuring the infallible "half-caste" detective Inspector Napoleon Bonaparte, aka "Bony." The crimes here are the cyanide poisonings of three middle-aged bachelors who were slovenly eaters, the near poisoning of a middle-aged widower (also a slovenly eater) ... and the stabbing death of a policewoman.

Is a serial killer--perhaps a female serial killer--at large? Can all four killings somehow be linked together? And what about the brilliant insane magician/quick-change artist who escaped from custody and who seems to have killed at least one of the victims?

Unlike many of Upfield's other mysteries, this novel--apparently his 19th book in a series of 37--presents Bony working on a case set entirely in a city and relying almost entirely on the abilities he supposedly inherited from his "white" father. In only two scenes do Bony's miraculous tracking skills, characteristic of his mother's Aboriginal people, come very briefly into play. And yet these facts are key to one of the chief pleasures this book provides: the defeat of a rival detective--an inept, egotistical racist named Stillman--who hoped to see Bony fired from the case.

Most readers should be able to solve at least half of this case, but I predict that fewer than one in five thousand, despite the fairness of the clues, will solve all of it--including HOW cyanide was placed in the beverages of the three murdered bachelors. As Bony points out several times, sane people have considerable difficulty when trying to imagine what is going on inside the minds of those who are insane. And THIS mystery seems in part to be peopled with characters that might be refugees from, say, Isak Dinesen's SEVEN GOTHIC TALES or the weird fictions of Flannery O'Connor.

Lest some readers feel that the bizarre setting, actions, and people portrayed in the closing pages of this book are totally unbelievable (including "a musty smell of decay"), I suggest that they recall--or Google--the recent real-life case of Australian chef Marcus Volke, who, in the fall of 2014, dismembered and cooked parts of his beautiful Indonesian girlfriend and whose crime was discovered only because his neighbors complained about the sickening odor of rotting meat coming from his quarters.

As is usual with Upfield's fiction, this book's "normal" characters are very well drawn (especially the burglar Jimmy Nimmo and the young reporter Luke Pavier), the psychology is more plausible than that in most other authors' books (in this case, especially when Bony is helping witnesses recover memories of what they saw), genuinely humorous passages occur (e.g., "They were the hands of a gifted person: the hands of a surgeon, a watchmaker, a burglar"; "But the police didn't catch Jack the Ripper, did they?" "Ah, but I wasn't in London," replies Bony), and along the way Bony and a few other characters drop at least half a dozen tidbits of "wisdom" that readers might do well to file away for future use in their own lives. And additional pleasures are to be found in this book as Bony humorously uses allusions other "crime fiction" to characterize himself--as a Sherlock Holmes in Chapter 2, and as an Inspector Javert in Chapter 9.

SMALL SPOILER-WARNING: For readers who (like me) deeply hate to read about puppies and kittens being sadistically tortured, be aware that Chapter 26 of this book contains a few brief descriptions of such disgusting acts.

In my judgment, despite several far-fetched coincidences and some unpleasant passages, this novel deserves a solid "A" grade.

POSTSCRIPT: The edition of this book which I own (Scribner's paperback, 1984) has several minor printing errors such as missing words (Chap. 15: "Against the foot of the broken hill and grey mullock dump could not be seen in the night"), one-syllable words being hyphenated (e.g., "flop-ped"; "stop-ped"), and minor spelling mistakes (e.g., "draw" for "drawer"; "kife" for "knife"; "vew" for "view").
  • Sharpbrew
THE BACHELORS OF BROKEN HILL (1950) by Arthur W. Upfield (British-born Australian, 1890-1964) is a Fair-Play Puzzle mystery novel set in Australia and featuring the infallible "half-caste" detective Inspector Napoleon Bonaparte, aka "Bony." The crimes here are the cyanide poisonings of three middle-aged bachelors who were slovenly eaters, the near poisoning of a middle-aged widower (also a slovenly eater) ... and the stabbing death of a policewoman.

Is a serial killer--perhaps a female serial killer--at large? Can all four killings somehow be linked together? And what about the brilliant insane magician/quick-change artist who escaped from custody and who seems to have killed at least one of the victims?

Unlike many of Upfield's other mysteries, this novel--apparently his 19th book in a series of 37--presents Bony working on a case set entirely in a city and relying almost entirely on the abilities he supposedly inherited from his "white" father. In only two scenes do Bony's miraculous tracking skills, characteristic of his mother's Aboriginal people, come very briefly into play. And yet these facts are key to one of the chief pleasures this book provides: the defeat of a rival detective--an inept, egotistical racist named Stillman--who hoped to see Bony fired from the case.

Most readers should be able to solve at least half of this case, but I predict that fewer than one in five thousand, despite the fairness of the clues, will solve all of it--including HOW cyanide was placed in the beverages of the three murdered bachelors. As Bony points out several times, sane people have considerable difficulty when trying to imagine what is going on inside the minds of those who are insane. And THIS mystery seems in part to be peopled with characters that might be refugees from, say, Isak Dinesen's SEVEN GOTHIC TALES or the weird fictions of Flannery O'Connor.

Lest some readers feel that the bizarre setting, actions, and people portrayed in the closing pages of this book are totally unbelievable (including "a musty smell of decay"), I suggest that they recall--or Google--the recent real-life case of Australian chef Marcus Volke, who, in the fall of 2014, dismembered and cooked parts of his beautiful Indonesian girlfriend and whose crime was discovered only because his neighbors complained about the sickening odor of rotting meat coming from his quarters.

As is usual with Upfield's fiction, this book's "normal" characters are very well drawn (especially the burglar Jimmy Nimmo and the young reporter Luke Pavier), the psychology is more plausible than that in most other authors' books (in this case, especially when Bony is helping witnesses recover memories of what they saw), genuinely humorous passages occur (e.g., "They were the hands of a gifted person: the hands of a surgeon, a watchmaker, a burglar"; "But the police didn't catch Jack the Ripper, did they?" "Ah, but I wasn't in London," replies Bony), and along the way Bony and a few other characters drop at least half a dozen tidbits of "wisdom" that readers might do well to file away for future use in their own lives. And additional pleasures are to be found in this book as Bony humorously uses allusions other "crime fiction" to characterize himself--as a Sherlock Holmes in Chapter 2, and as an Inspector Javert in Chapter 9.

SMALL SPOILER-WARNING: For readers who (like me) deeply hate to read about puppies and kittens being sadistically tortured, be aware that Chapter 26 of this book contains a few brief descriptions of such disgusting acts.

In my judgment, despite several far-fetched coincidences and some unpleasant passages, this novel deserves a solid "A" grade.

POSTSCRIPT: The edition of this book which I own (Scribner's paperback, 1984) has several minor printing errors such as missing words (Chap. 15: "Against the foot of the broken hill and grey mullock dump could not be seen in the night"), one-syllable words being hyphenated (e.g., "flop-ped"; "stop-ped"), and minor spelling mistakes (e.g., "draw" for "drawer"; "kife" for "knife"; "vew" for "view").