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Download The Absent City eBook

by Sergio Waisman,Ricardo Piglia

Download The Absent City eBook
ISBN:
0822325578
Author:
Sergio Waisman,Ricardo Piglia
Category:
World Literature
Language:
English
Publisher:
Duke University Press Books (November 15, 2000)
Pages:
160 pages
EPUB book:
1346 kb
FB2 book:
1593 kb
DJVU:
1660 kb
Other formats
mobi txt lrf doc
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
804


The Absent City is a book for our times, one that transcends national boundaries In recent interviews, Ricardo Piglia has stated that The Absent City should have had a greater length.

The Absent City is a book for our times, one that transcends national boundaries. Francine Masiello, author of Between Civilization and Barbarism: Women, Nation, and Literary Culture in Modern Argentina. Though clearly walking in the riverbank footsteps of the whimsical Macedonio and the noir geniuses Arlt and Onetti, Piglia is a genuine original, gifted with a fluid imagination that rushes past traditional narrative boundaries. In recent interviews, Ricardo Piglia has stated that The Absent City should have had a greater length. After reading the novel, I find myself agreeing with him. Let's start by saying this is not a novel for any reader.

THE ABSENT CITY by Ricardo Piglia Now that I have finished Piglia’ s masterpiece I am astounded how dense and powerful this book can be; In just 139 pages he tells a tale covering journalism, loss. Пользовательский отзыв - Kirkus. First published in 1992, this highly allusive and inventive novel from the Argentine author of Artificial Respiration (1994), et. employs a memorable metaphor for the lingering echoes of his country.

The Absent City book. Translated and with an introduction by Sergio Waisman, it includes a new afterword by the author. Ricardo Piglia combines his trademar Widely acclaimed throughout Latin America after its 1992 release in Argentina, The Absent City takes the form of a futuristic detective novel.

Ricardo Piglia The Absent City INTRODUCTION Sergio Waisman The Absent City is Ricardo Piglia’s third book to be translated into English, and the second published by Duke University. The Absent City is Ricardo Piglia’s third book to be translated into English, and the second published by Duke University Press. Since its original publication in Argentina in 1992, it has been widely read and hailed in the Spanish-speaking world for its combination of literary innovation and poignant sociopolitical reflection.

The Absent City is Ricardo Piglia’s third book to be translated into English, and the second published by Duke University Press. Ricardo Piglia was born in Adrogué, in the Province of Buenos Aires, in 1940

The Absent City is Ricardo Piglia’s third book to be translated into English, and the second published by Duke University Press. Ricardo Piglia was born in Adrogué, in the Province of Buenos Aires, in 1940.

Waisman, Sergio Gabriel. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Trent University Library Donation. Durham, NC : Duke University Press. inlibrary; printdisabled; trent university;. Kahle/Austin Foundation. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by station23. cebu on August 9, 2019. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Ricardo Piglia (November 24, 1941, Adrogué, Argentina – January 6, 2017, Buenos Aires) was an Argentine author, critic, and scholar best known for introducing hard-boiled fiction to the Argentine public. Born in Adrogué, Piglia was raised in Mar del Plata. He studied history in 1961-1962 at the National University of La Plata. Ricardo Piglia published his first collection of fiction in 1967, La invasión.

Author: Ricardo Piglia. Translator: Sergio Waisman. Read a fragment illustrations. Annotation: Ricardo Piglia The Absent City INTRODUCTION Sergio Waisman The Absent City is Ricardo Piglia’s third book to be translated into English, and the second published by Duke University Press.

Sergio Waisman is Professor of Spanish and International Affairs at the George Washington University, where . Sergio Waisman has translated six books of Latin American literature, including The Absent City by Ricardo Piglia (Duke Univ

Sergio Waisman is Professor of Spanish and International Affairs at the George Washington University, where he has been teaching since 2003. He is also Affiliated Faculty of Judaic Studies. Sergio Waisman has translated six books of Latin American literature, including The Absent City by Ricardo Piglia (Duke Univ. Press), for which he received an NEA Translation Fellowship Award in 2000. His first novel, Leaving, was published in the . in 2004 (Intelibooks), and in 2010 as Irse in Argentina (bajo la luna).

Widely acclaimed throughout Latin America after its 1992 release in Argentina, The Absent City takes the form of a futuristic detective novel. In the end, however, it is a meditation on the nature of totalitarian regimes, on the transition to democracy after the end of such regimes, and on the power of language to create and define reality. Ricardo Piglia combines his trademark avant-garde aesthetics with astute cultural and political insights into Argentina’s history and contemporary condition in this conceptually daring and entertaining work.The novel follows Junior, a reporter for a daily Buenos Aires newspaper, as he attempts to locate a secret machine that contains the mind and the memory of a woman named Elena. While Elena produces stories that reflect on actual events in Argentina, the police are seeking her destruction because of the revelations of atrocities that she—the machine—is disseminating through texts and taped recordings. The book thus portrays the race to recover the history and memory of a city and a country where history has largely been obliterated by political repression. Its narratives—all part of a detective story, all part of something more—multiply as they intersect with each other, like the streets and avenues of Buenos Aires itself. The second of Piglia’s novels to be translated by Duke University Press—the first was Artifical Respiration—this book continues the author’s quest to portray the abuses and atrocities that characterize dictatorships as well as the difficulties associated with making the transition to democracy. Translated and with an introduction by Sergio Waisman, it includes a new afterword by the author.
  • Fegelv
In recent interviews, Ricardo Piglia has stated that The Absent City should have had a greater length. After reading the novel, I find myself agreeing with him. Let's start by saying this is not a novel for any reader. It has complex, difficult literary references, especially of Argentine literature and culture, and I have met more than one reader who has been utterly dissatisfied with the overall plot and structure of the novel. I am not one of those. In the tradition of Macedonio Fernández (to whom this novel is a clear homage) and Witold Gombrowicz, Piglia intends to erase the conventional, traditional lines of the novel. In order to do that, he introduces to the plot a secret machine (the Macedonio machine) that multiplies stories and scenarios that conjure up a surreal (but more than surreal), futuristic (but more than futuristic), detective (but more than detective) novel that I was unable to stop reading. Back to my first statement, I would agree with the author that this should have been a larger work, in the recent tradition -Piglia would probably not agree with this comparison- of Bolaño's Savage Detectives or Cortázar's Hopscotch. I would highly recommend this novel along with Macedonio's The Museum of Eterna's Novel. They would be creating a new world within your own just like in the tradition -and I know Piglia would agree, or at least feel flattered, with this comparison- of Jorge Luis Borges.
  • Kage
I haven't started to read this yet, but on a glance it appears to be intriguing. Until I read this I have nothing more to say.