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Download Papilionum Britanniæ icones, nomina, &c. Containing the figures, ... of above eighty English butter-flies, ... By James Petiver, ... eBook

by James Petiver

Download Papilionum Britanniæ icones, nomina, &c. Containing the figures, ... of above eighty English butter-flies, ... By James Petiver, ... eBook
ISBN:
1170138438
Author:
James Petiver
Category:
History
Language:
English
Publisher:
Gale ECCO, Print Editions (June 9, 2010)
Pages:
20 pages
EPUB book:
1719 kb
FB2 book:
1976 kb
DJVU:
1886 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
827


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ISBN13:9781170138434. Release Date:June 2010.

Most of Petiver's shorter papers appeared either in the "Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society", or in "The Monthly Miscellany; or Memoirs for the Curious", 3 vols. 1707-09, of which the first two vols. were re-issued in 1710 under the title of "A compleat volume of the Memoirs for the Curious, from Jan.

James Petiver (c. 1665 – c. 2 April 1718) was a London apothecary, a fellow of the Royal Society as well as London's informal Temple Coffee House Botany Club. 2 April 1718) was a London apothecary, a fellow of the Royal Society as well as London's informal Temple Coffee House Botany Club, famous for his specimen collections in which he traded and study of botany and entomology. He corresponded with John Ray and some of his notes and specimens were used by Carolus Linnaeus in descriptions of new species. The genus Petiveria was named in his honour by Charles Plumier.

James Petiver (. 665–1718) was a London apothecary, a Fellow of the . He recorded many English folk-names for butterflies, also coining some himself, and wrote some of the first butterfly books that used English names in addition to Latin

James Petiver (. 665–1718) was a London apothecary, a Fellow of the Royal Society as well as London's informal Temple Coffee House Botany Club, famous for his study of botany and entomology. He recorded many English folk-names for butterflies, also coining some himself, and wrote some of the first butterfly books that used English names in addition to Latin He named the White Admiral butterfly, and gave the name Fritillary to another group of butterflies after the Latin word for a chequered dice box.

PETIVER, JAMES (1663–1718), botanist and entomologist, son of James and Mary Petiver, born at Hillmorton, near Rugby, Warwickshire, in 1663 (cf. Sloane MSS. 2360, f. 5 b), was, from 1676, educated at Rugby free school (Rugby School Reg. p. 1) ‘under. 1) ‘under the patronage of a kind grandfather, Mr. Richard Elborowe’ (Sloane MS. 3339, f. 10), and was apprenticed, not later than 1683, to Mr. Feltham, apothecary to St. Bartholomew's Hospital, London

James Petiver (. 665–1718) was a London apothecary, a. .

This book is loaded with clear step-by-step instructions and illustrations, anatomical charts and information, and before-and-after comparisons you won’t find anywhere else-all tailored to creating authentic Japanese-style manga

This book is loaded with clear step-by-step instructions and illustrations, anatomical charts and information, and before-and-after comparisons you won’t find anywhere else-all tailored to creating authentic Japanese-style manga. And in addition to the breakdowns of the various sections of the body, you’ll also learn how all the different elements-including faces and costumes-come together to form complete characters. Basic Anatomy for the Manga Artist contains everything you need to know. No aspiring mangaka (manga artist) should be without it. 0823047709BAMA. Born in Hillmorton, Warwickshire where his father was a haberdasher, he studied at Rugby Free School and became an apprentice to an apothecary in London, supplying medicine to St. Bartholomew's Hospital. He is buried at St. Botolph Church.

The 18th century was a wealth of knowledge, exploration and rapidly growing technology and expanding record-keeping made possible by advances in the printing press. In its determination to preserve the century of revolution, Gale initiated a revolution of its own: digitization of epic proportions to preserve these invaluable works in the largest archive of its kind. Now for the first time these high-quality digital copies of original 18th century manuscripts are available in print, making them highly accessible to libraries, undergraduate students, and independent scholars.Medical theory and practice of the 1700s developed rapidly, as is evidenced by the extensive collection, which includes descriptions of diseases, their conditions, and treatments. Books on science and technology, agriculture, military technology, natural philosophy, even cookbooks, are all contained here.++++The below data was compiled from various identification fields in the bibliographic record of this title. This data is provided as an additional tool in helping to insure edition identification:++++<sourceLibrary>British Library<ESTCID>T115591<Notes>Drop-head title. Imprint from colophon. Also issued, with the text imposed on two leaves, as part of: 'Jacobi Petiveri Opera' vol. 2, London, 1764.<imprintFull>London : printed for the author, 1717. <collation>2p.,6 plates ; 2°

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