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Download Pavlov's Physiology Factory: Experiment, Interpretation, Laboratory Enterprise eBook

by Daniel P. Todes

Download Pavlov's Physiology Factory: Experiment, Interpretation, Laboratory Enterprise eBook
ISBN:
0801866901
Author:
Daniel P. Todes
Category:
Medicine
Language:
English
Publisher:
Johns Hopkins University Press; 1 edition (November 20, 2001)
Pages:
512 pages
EPUB book:
1968 kb
FB2 book:
1548 kb
DJVU:
1660 kb
Other formats
rtf mbr docx txt
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
278


Todes has presumably reserved this topic for his forthcoming biography of Pavlov.

Pavlov's Physiology Factory: Experiment, Interpretation, Laboratory Enterprise (Daniel P. Todes). 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63. 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126.

Daniel Todes has written a masterful book that offers a unique combination of an insider's understanding of Pavlov's science and the outsider's perspective of the critical historian. Dr. Todes's exhaustive study of Ivan Pavlov's laboratory from 1891 to 1904 illustrates the transformation of a lone-investigator to the manager of a large team of scientists all contributing data, experiments, and methods to a larger body of work.

Examining the fascinating content of Pavlov's scientific notes and correspondence, unpublished memoirs, and laboratory publications, Todes explores the importance of Pavlov's directorship of what the author calls . .

In Lectures on the Work of the Main Digestive Glands, for which Pavlov won the Nobel Prize in 1904, the scientist frequently referred to the experiments of his coworkers and stated that his conclusions reflected "the deed of the entire laboratory.

Pavlov's Physiology Factory book. Start by marking Pavlov's Physiology Factory: Experiment, Interpretation, Laboratory Enterprise as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Similar books and articles. Pavlov’s Physiology Factory: Experiment, Interpretation, Laboratory Enterprise. Pavlov's Physiology Factory. Daniel Todes - 1997 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 88:205-246. Pavlov and the Bolsheviks

Similar books and articles. Pavlov and the Bolsheviks. Daniel P. Todes - 1995 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 17 (3):379 - 418. Love-Hate for Man-Machine Metaphors in Soviet Physiology: From Pavlov to Physiological Cybernetics. Slava Gerovitch - 2002 - Science in Context 15 (2):339-374. IP Pavlov and the Freedom Reflex.

Russian physiologist and Nobel Prize winner Ivan Pavlov is most famous for his development of the concept of the conditioned reflex and the classic experiment in which he trained a dog to salivate at the sound of a bell. In this study, Daniel P. Todes explores Pavlov's early work in digestive physiology through the structures and practices of his landmark laboratory - the physiology department of the Imperial Institute for Experimental Medicine.

In Pavlov's Physiology Factory: Experiment, Interpretation, Laboratory Enterprise, Daniel P. Todes explores Pavlov's early work in digestive physiology through the structures and practices of his landmark laboratory?the physiology. ISBN13:9780801866906.

His discussion of Jewish lawyers who sought to ameliorate the position of Jews through the judicial framework is the most interesting section of the book

His discussion of Jewish lawyers who sought to ameliorate the position of Jews through the judicial framework is the most interesting section of the book. Pavlov's Physiology Factory: Experiment, Interpretation, Laboratory Enterprise

About the Department.

Russian physiologist and Nobel Prize winner Ivan Pavlov is most famous for his development of the concept of the conditional reflex and the classic experiment in which he trained a dog to salivate at the sound of a bell. In Pavlov's Physiology Factory: Experiment, Interpretation, Laboratory Enterprise, Daniel P. Todes explores Pavlov's early work in digestive physiology through the structures and practices of his landmark laboratory―the physiology department of the Imperial Institute for Experimental Medicine.

In Lectures on the Work of the Main Digestive Glands, for which Pavlov won the Nobel Prize in 1904, the scientist frequently referred to the experiments of his coworkers and stated that his conclusions reflected "the deed of the entire laboratory." This novel claim caused the prize committee some consternation. Was he alone deserving of the prize? Examining the fascinating content of Pavlov's scientific notes and correspondence, unpublished memoirs, and laboratory publications, Pavlov's Physiology Factory explores the importance of Pavlov's directorship of what the author calls a "physiology factory" and illuminates its relationship to Pavlov's Nobel Prize-winning work and the research on conditional reflexes that followed it.

Todes looks at Pavlov's performance in his various roles as laboratory manager, experimentalist, entrepreneur, and scientific visionary. He discusses changes wrought by government and commercial interests in science and sheds light on the pathways of scientific development in Russia―making clear Pavlov's personal achievements while also examining his style of laboratory management. Pavlov's Physiology Factory thus addresses issues of importance to historians of science and scientists today: "big" versus "small" science, the dynamics of experiment and interpretation, and the development of research cultures.

  • Corgustari
I am not sure if it is worth the money.
It provides a historical account, in context, of Pavlov's legacy.
The information is not necessarily richer than what one may access from the web.
  • fabscf
Dr. Todes's exhaustive study of Ivan Pavlov's laboratory from 1891 to 1904 illustrates the transformation of a lone-investigator to the manager of a large team of scientists all contributing data, experiments, and methods to a larger body of work. This change in scientific style is characeristic of the professionalization of scientific careers in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and has much to say about the origins of current laboratory enterprises with teams of technicians, research assistants, graduate students, and post-doctoral scientists all working under a single senior scientist. Todes's detailed analysis of letters, laboratory notebooks, and archival collections in Russia makes this the definitive work in English on Ivan Pavlov's work. It is limited to the work on digestion that earned Pavlov the Nobel Prize, but does not provide a complete account of the work on conditioned reflexes for which Pavlov is now most famous, a subject that the author may have chosen to save for a larger biography of Pavlov. Nonetheless, if we want to understand how a previously obscure physiologist became the leader of a world-class research institute, using the Russian royal family for support, Todes's work is the place to start. Definitive and well worth reading!