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Download The Ghost Map: The Story of London's Most Terrifying Epidemic--and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World eBook

by Steven Johnson

Download The Ghost Map: The Story of London's Most Terrifying Epidemic--and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World eBook
ISBN:
1594482691
Author:
Steven Johnson
Category:
Medicine
Language:
English
Publisher:
Riverhead Books; Reprint edition (October 2, 2007)
Pages:
328 pages
EPUB book:
1157 kb
FB2 book:
1540 kb
DJVU:
1846 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
798


Yet The Ghost Map is a far more ambitious and compelling work.

Yet The Ghost Map is a far more ambitious and compelling work. Mr. Johnson is never less than lively and beguiling. The Wall Street Journal. Steven Johnson is the bestselling author of eleven books, including Where Good Ideas Come From, Wonderland, and The Ghost Map. He's the host and co-creator of the Emmy-winning PBS/BBC series How We Got To Now, and the host of the podcast American Innovations. Through the London epidemic of Cholera in 1854, the author presents the Victorian era science, public opinions and participating individuals in the pursuit of stopping the epidemic.

Analysis of social forces working in science? Why yes, please! This cholera epidemic struck before widespread acceptance of germ theory, so most people thought that it (and other diseases) was caused by smelly miasma interacting with poor people’s conveniently innate weakness and inferiority and stuff. Several years before the Broad Street epidemic, John Snow developed an alternate, water-borne theory of cholera transmission, and evidence provided by this epidemic started tipping the scales in its favor.

The Ghost Map: The Story of London's Most Terrifying Epidemic – and How it Changed Science, Cities and the Modern World is a book by Steven Berlin Johnson in which he describes the most intense outbreak of cholera in Victorian London and centers.

The Ghost Map: The Story of London's Most Terrifying Epidemic – and How it Changed Science, Cities and the Modern World is a book by Steven Berlin Johnson in which he describes the most intense outbreak of cholera in Victorian London and centers on John Snow and Henry Whitehead. It was released on 19 October 2006 through Riverhead. The work covers the 1854 Broad Street cholera outbreak.

Электронная книга "The Ghost Map: The Story of London's Most Terrifying Epidemic-and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World", Steven Johnson. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Ghost Map: The Story of London's Most Terrifying Epidemic-and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

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Sorrow prepares you for joy. It violently sweeps everything out of your house, so that new joy can find space to enter

Sorrow prepares you for joy. It violently sweeps everything out of your house, so that new joy can find space to enter. It shakes the yellow leaves from the bough of your heart, so that fresh, green leaves can grow in their place. It pulls up the rotten roots, so that new roots hidden beneath have room to grow. Whatever sorrow shakes from your heart, far better things will take their place. How To Stop Worrying And Start.

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If you enjoy books based on science and facts, this book would be good for you. Проверенная покупка: да Состояние товара: Подержанные. A Good Book about Crap. Interesting reading about the relationship of a city (London) to its sewers!

Mobile version (beta).

Mobile version (beta). The Ghost Map: The Story of London's Most Terrifying Epidemic - and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World. Download (epub, 601 Kb). FB2 PDF MOBI TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

The Ghost Map charts the London cholera epidemic of 1854, from which Johnson extracts a.

The Ghost Map charts the London cholera epidemic of 1854, from which Johnson extracts a saga of human ingenuity and true communal effort. What attracted you to the story of London’s 1854 cholera epidemic? I’ve always been fascinated by this period, because in many ways Londoners were living through something that had genuinely never been experienced before in human history – a true metropolis with close to three million people sharing 90 square miles. So there’s great novelty and turbulence to the setting, but at the same time, it’s an experience that would become increasingly commonplace in the next century.

Johnson, 2007) In the ghost map, both complex and simple diagrammatic techniques were deployed to.Efforts to create more sustainable cities are evident in the proliferation of sustainability policies in cities worldwide.

Johnson, 2007) In the ghost map, both complex and simple diagrammatic techniques were deployed to express the relationship between public space and disease. We can trace this type of visual information coding back to The Nolli Map of Rome. It has become widely proposed that the success of these urban sustainability initiatives will require city agencies to partner with, and even cede authority to, organizations from other sectors and levels of government.

A National Bestseller, a New York Times Notable Book, and an Entertainment Weekly Best Book of the Year It's the summer of 1854, and London is just emerging as one of the first modern cities in the world. But lacking the infrastructure-garbage removal, clean water, sewers-necessary to support its rapidly expanding population, the city has become the perfect breeding ground for a terrifying disease no one knows how to cure. As the cholera outbreak takes hold, a physician and a local curate are spurred to action-and ultimately solve the most pressing medical riddle of their time. In a triumph of multidisciplinary thinking, Johnson illuminates the intertwined histories of the spread of disease, the rise of cities, and the nature of scientific inquiry, offering both a riveting history and a powerful explanation of how it has shaped the world we live in.
  • Flathan
Through the London epidemic of Cholera in 1854, the author presents the Victorian era science, public opinions and participating individuals in the pursuit of stopping the epidemic. The book is about the urbanization of society and subsequent public health challenges, and how the experience shaped the management of urban governing through science, sociology and engineering and the future ramifications of urban issues in the time of global dangers. It is one of those exemplary non fiction, history/science/technology books that are entertaining with interesting participants, and their opponents--personal, political and environmental--, but in the end the triumph against all odds, thanks to some luck, but a whole lot of tenacity and scientific and personal integrity and faith. There are many lessons, one of which is what Susan Sontag wrote about as well, the malice of attaching morality to disease--here, for example phrenology, or internal constitution as a factor, classism, or the treatment of people with AIDS during the Reagan administration in our time. I found the only problem with this book is that his Epilogue is way too long than necessary, and he repeats same issues that have been discussed already.
  • Kardana
A very good and interesting introduction to English life of the ordinary people. The aristocrat's life of ease rested on the shoulders of these people who struggled just to live. The primary reason that country people began to move to the cities was because many estates were converted to sheep farming. See the history of the so-called 'Highland clearances'.
The description of the disposal of human bodies and graveyards in general makes one wonder why cremation was not widespread.
Concerning Johnson's discussion of the scavengers in third world countries, in America, in the 21st Century we still have people who make their living scavenging the streets, highways and dumpsters for metal, such as aluminum cans.
It's interesting that Dr. Snow and the Rev. Whitehead actually interviewed people in the cholera infected areas. The aristocracy generally had no interest in the underclasses.
All in all, The Ghost Map is a document celebrating the triumph of the scientific method versus "everybody knows".
Read it. You may learn something.
Since this book was published in 2006, some sections are now dated.
  • Thordigda
“What in the world can we do with all of this s***?” That was the question of the day for two million 19th century Londoners. The night soil men proved ill equipped to keep up with removing the volumes of human excrement overflowing from cesspools and rising in basements of the Soho and Golden Square neighborhoods. It was clear London needed a new sewage system.

Opening the pages of this most impressive account of sleuthing the source of the cholera outbreak was simply fascinating. Reverend Henry Whitehead and Dr. John Snow, two strangers of different backgrounds, joined together by circumstance shared valuable information and expertise. Independently each spent countless of hours interviewing, recording, and analyzing all collected data. The scientific mind of Dr. Snow compiled a map indicating the location and number of deaths therein. Whitehead as a trusted, respected local was key in turning the made up minds of city agencies who stubbornly clung to the idea the disease originated in the foul, smelly air to accepting the actual catalyst for the outbreak.

This is really an outstanding detective story very well told. A history lesson if you will. The facts, players and uncanny elusiveness of this indiscriminate killer called cholera progressed systematically without the bog down of boring statistics. The author skillfully carries history into our modern times with glimpses into our foreseeable future. A notable writing achievement.
  • Keel
This would be a five star book if the last 30 pages hadn't drifted into a conversation on nuclear weapons that is only tangentially related to the book itself. Anyone who has ever taken an epidemiology class has heard of John Snow and the Broad Street Pump, but this was a much more detailed account. In the same spirit of the Microbe Hunters, Steven Johnson puts his readers in the mind of the subjects. The quotes are real the thoughts inferred, but the story comes to life in a way a more traditional biographical or timeline approach can never do. Whether you care about cholera outbreaks in Victorian London or not, this is an interesting story about two determined men, public health, and how much city life has and hasn't changed.