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Download Adult Neurogenesis: Stem Cells and Neuronal Development in the Adult Brain eBook

by Gerd Kempermann

Download Adult Neurogenesis: Stem Cells and Neuronal Development in the Adult Brain eBook
ISBN:
0195179714
Author:
Gerd Kempermann
Category:
Medicine
Language:
English
Publisher:
Oxford University Press; 1 edition (November 28, 2005)
Pages:
448 pages
EPUB book:
1331 kb
FB2 book:
1756 kb
DJVU:
1738 kb
Other formats
rtf lit mobi docx
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
619


The discovery of adult neurogenesis and of stem cells in the brain has changed our view of the mature brain. Yet stem cells, which have the potential to produce new neurons, can be found throughout the adult brain.

The discovery of adult neurogenesis and of stem cells in the brain has changed our view of the mature brain. Though we now know that the adult brain can make new neurons, it normally does so only in two privileged regions, the olfactory bulb and the hippocampus. So why does the brain not make wider use of its potential for neurogenesis? And what is the function of new neurons and of neural stem cells in areas where they occur?

A paper in this issue of EMBO reports shows that endogenous electric currents exist in the adult mouse brain and that they may guide neuroblast migration.

A paper in this issue of EMBO reports shows that endogenous electric currents exist in the adult mouse brain and that they may guide neuroblast migration. These findings and their implications are discussed here.

adult neurogenesis remains neurogenesis. largely a mystery, despite much speculation and some clever experiments. One argument put forward by the author is that Tora K. Smulders-Srinivasan complex cognition is incompatible with a high turnover of Tom V. Smulders neurons. Smulders neurons

5 people like this topic.

5 people like this topic.

Adult Neurogenesis book. The discovery of adult neurogenesis and of stem cells in the brain has. Start by marking Adult Neurogenesis: Stem Cells and Neuronal Development in the Adult Brain as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Adult neurogenesis is the process in which neurons are generated from neural stem cells in the adult. This process is different from the others embryonic development of neurogenesis. In most mammals, new neurons are born throughout adulthood in two regions of the brain: The subgranular zone (SGZ), part of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, where neural stem cells give birth to granule cells (implicated in memory formation and learning).

cle{alSC, title {Neuronal stem cells and adult neurogenesis. In many fields of modern medicine and medically oriented biology the growing interest in stem cells has fundamentally changed the perception of what is therapeutically possible. 17-28 } }. Gerd Kempermann. In principle, stem cell biology has introduced cellular replacement strategies even to fields where classical organ transplantation, such as heart and kidney, was impossible - most notably neurobiology (Gage 2000).

10: Culturing Adult Neural Stem Cells: Application to the Study of. .Part V Adult Neurogenesis in the Olfactory Bulb. 12 Epithelial Organization of Adult Neurogenic Germinal Niches.

10: Culturing Adult Neural Stem Cells: Application to the Study of Neurodegenerative and Neuropsychiatric Pathology. 1. Procedures of the Neurosphere Assay. Application of the Neurosphere Assay to Understanding In Vivo Neural Stem Cell Function. Concluding Remarks. 9 Adult Neurogenesis and Neuronal Subtype Specification in the Neocortex. 173 Noriyuki Kishi, U. Shivraj Sohur, Jason G. Emsley, and Jeffrey D. Macklis.

Recent studies have shown that neural stem cells (NSCs) are present in the subventricular zone (SVZ) lining the .

Recent studies have shown that neural stem cells (NSCs) are present in the subventricular zone (SVZ) lining the lateral ventricles and the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) in adult mouse, rat, nonhuman primate, and human brain. In addition, many CNS diseases can stimulate the proliferation of neuronal stem/progenitor cells located in the SVZ and SGZ of the adult rodent brain, and the resulting newborn cells migrate into damaged brain regions, where they express mature neuronal markers. Therefore, it might be possible for damaged cells to be replaced from endogenous neural stem cell pools.

Adult Neurogenesis: Stem Cells and Neuronal Development in the Adult Brain. Now I wish that I had broken down and bought it much sooner. I've been leaning on this book heavily for a lot of the basic background info for my PhD thesis proposal.

The discovery of adult neurogenesis and of stem cells in the brain has changed our view of the mature brain. Though we now know that the adult brain can make new neurons, it normally does so only in two privileged regions, the olfactory bulb and the hippocampus. Yet stem cells, which have the potential to produce new neurons, can be found throughout the adult brain. So why does the brain not make wider use of its potential for neurogenesis? And what is the function of new neurons and of neural stem cells in areas where they occur? After all, the brain regenerates poorly and many neurological and psychiatric disorders are chronic because cell replacement has not taken place. This is the first comprehensive, integrated account of one of the most exciting areas of neuroscience. It begins with the historical background and discusses theories of adult neurogenesis and neural stem cell biology in the context of learning and memory processes as well as structural plasticity. It describes in detail neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus and olfactory system and then surveys the regulatory, functional, and comparative aspects, concluding with a chapter on the provocative hypotheses that link failing adult neurogenesis with such diseases as temporal lobe epilepsy, major depression, brain tumors, and dementias. For graduate students, investigators, and clinicians in the neurosciences, developmental biology, and stem cell research, this book is a unique resource that sifts through the evidence for exciting scientific ideas and fosters a realistic view of the therapeutic possibilities for the use of stem cells in the adult brain.
  • Unirtay
Adult neurogenesis - the generation of new neurons in the adult brain - is one of the most exciting fields of inquiry in the neurosciences. Most people believed it to be impossible until quite recently. Gradually that view gave way to another: that perhaps it could occur under certain special circumstances. Now it has become an accepted part of mammalian neurobiology. While the best evidence for adult neurogenesis is in the olfactory bulb and hippocampus. There are tantalizing clues that it may also occur in other regions of the adult brain.

This is one of the first books in English to provide a comprehensive account of this fascinating field. It is written by Gerd Kempermann, who is Head of the Research Group, Neural Stem Cells, at the Max Delbruck Center for Molecular Medicine in Berlin-Buch in Germany, who is a recognized leader in the field.

The twelve chapters are arranged logically and systematically:

1. Introduction

2. History

3. Neural Stem Cells

4. Neuronal Development

5. Neurogenesis in Adult Olfactory System

6. Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis

7. Technical Notes

8. Neurogenic and Non-neurogenic Regions

9. Regulation

10. Function

11. Adult Neurogenesis in Different Animal Species

12. Medicine

Beginning with a brief overview and historical background, the book moves on to discuss theories of adult neurogenesis and neural stem cell biology in learning and memory as well as structural plasticity. After describing neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus and olfactory system, Professor Kempermann takes us through the current state of knowledge about the regulation and functions of neurogenesis. I particularly liked the last section where he tries - with some success - to tie failures of adult neurogenesis with some neurological diseases including temporal lobe epilepsy, major depression, some brain tumors and dementias. Some of these ideas have been published in scholarly articles over the last five years, but here the ideas are collected together and developed for the first time.

There is an important point that I could not find in the book: loss of the ability to smell, or to distinguish smells, are common early features of Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. In both there may also be pathology in the hippocampus. So the link between loss of olfaction and loss of memory may be impaired neurogenesis in the two sites.

The book is well written, despite English being a second language for the author. The illustrations are well selected and well produced.

At a time when it takes months or even a year or more to publish papers in the scientific literature, it is always difficult to try and keep books up to date. This one has plenty of citations up to the second half of 2004.

Serious students will want to use this book as a starting point and then supplement it with some reviews from the literature. (Interested readers will find regular updates on adult neurogenesis on my blogs.)

This book is an easy read and will be of interest to anyone interested in the brain and the mind, how things can go wrong, and some of the extraordinary promise of adult neurogenesis.

Highly recommended.
  • Sharpmane
The title refers to the hypothesis that before there was DNA there was RNA, inhabiting a world in which not only basic synthesis but also the storing of genetic information was the prerogative of RNA. But the book is much more than this: it is a primer on the world of RNA in its many forms. Each chapter is an authoritative essay on a particular aspect of RNA, from riboswitches to the dynamics of RNA folding. Anyone who wants to access current knowledge about how cells function at a biochemical level should read this book; because of the breadth of subject-matter and the caliber of the contributors, even a specialist is likely to find something new and stimulating.

Too often books of this type are badly written and crammed with unexplained jargon; here the text is a masterpiece of clarity and technical terms are carefully introduced and elucidated. A non-specialist can easily pick up this book and, several hours later, emerge with a good conceptual framework in mind.

The only caveat is that today the field of RNA research is moving so quickly that any hardcopy text will quickly fall out of date. The new work on siRNA, for example, is progressing with such speed that the reader will want to supplement this text with some online research of their own in order to come right up-to-date.
  • Mr_Mole
Although it has been a lot of years since RNA was discovered, and even many years since the breakthrough discoveries by Altman and Cech of RNA Catalytic activity, the new discoveries keep coming, and indeed at a faster and increasing rate. I don't know if it has been the intent of this book to be a sort of master journal of the most significant happening in the area, but it seems to have turned out so.

This is the third edition of 'The RNA World' and it has a series of 25 papers produced by what might be called a 'Who's Who' and a 'What's What' of RNA research. The are broken down by categories with the following names:

The Origins of RNA and RNA at the Origin

Building a Functional RNA

Exiting the Ancient RNA World - Synthetases and Ribosomes

Richness of RNA Roles in a Modern RNA World

RNA Continues to Triumph Over DNA

Emerging Tools.

This is a book that any researcher, any laboratory, any organization doing RNA work simply has to have.