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Download Pictures of the Mind: What the New Neuroscience Tells Us About Who We Are (FT Press Science) eBook

by Miriam Boleyn-Fitzgerald

Download Pictures of the Mind: What the New Neuroscience Tells Us About Who We Are (FT Press Science) eBook
ISBN:
0137155166
Author:
Miriam Boleyn-Fitzgerald
Category:
Medicine
Language:
English
Publisher:
FT Press; 1 edition (January 17, 2010)
Pages:
208 pages
EPUB book:
1500 kb
FB2 book:
1574 kb
DJVU:
1509 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.7
Votes:
710


In this straightforward and illuminating book, Miriam Boleyn-Fitzgerald reveals . Publication Date: January 8, 2010.

In this straightforward and illuminating book, Miriam Boleyn-Fitzgerald reveals pictures in both visual and narrative form that capture the power of the mind to transform the brain. How our mental lives shape and are shaped by neural circuitry–itself forever being molded by experience–is the central theme of these powerful portraits of what it means to be human.

Pictures of the Mind book

Pictures of the Mind book. Through author Miriam Boleyn-Fitzgerald's masterfully written narrative and use stunning imagery, you'll watch human brains healing, growing, and adapting to challenges. Boleyn-Fitzgerald shows how these discoveries are transforming our very understanding of the "self," from an essentially static entity to one that can learn and change throughout life and even master the art of happiness.

Pictures of the Mind: What the New Neuroscience Tells Us About Who We Are (FT Press Science). Miriam Boleyn-Fitzgerald. Download (mobi, . 3 Mb). EPUB FB2 PDF TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Электронная книга "Pictures of the Mind: What the New Neuroscience Tells Us About Who We Are", Miriam Boleyn-Fitzgerald

Электронная книга "Pictures of the Mind: What the New Neuroscience Tells Us About Who We Are", Miriam Boleyn-Fitzgerald. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Pictures of the Mind: What the New Neuroscience Tells Us About Who We Are" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Her conclusion, that healing may often lie with us, joins science with the wisdom of the ages.

Author: Miriam Boleyn-Fitzgerald THE SCIENTIST IN THE CRIB What Early Learning Tells Us About th. .

Author: Miriam Boleyn-Fitzgerald. THE SCIENTIST IN THE CRIB What Early Learning Tells Us About the Mind Alison Gopnik, P. Andrew N. Meltzoff, P. Who We Are.

Pictures of Mind : What the New Neuroscience Tells Us About Who We Are. by Miriam Boleyn-Fitzgerald. Neuroscientists once believed your brain was essentially "locked down" by adulthood. If you grew up depressed, angry, sad, aggressive, or nasty, you'd be that way for life. And, as you grew older, there'd be nowhere to go but down, as disease, age, or injury wiped out precious, irreplaceable brain cells. But over the past five, ten, twenty years, all that's changed.

By: Miriam Boleyn-Fitzgerald. Publisher: FT Press PTG.

The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9780137155163, 0137155166. By: Miriam Boleyn-Fitzgerald. Print ISBN: 9780137155163, 0137155166. eText ISBN: 9780137054480, 0137054483.

by Miriam Boleyn-Fitzgerald. We can tell you if you would like this book! Rate some books to find out! Blurb.

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Neuroscientists once believed your brain was essentially "locked down" by adulthood. No new cells. No major changes. If you grew up depressed, angry, sad, aggressive, or nasty, you'd be that way for life. And, as you grew older, there'd be nowhere to go but down, as disease, age, or injury wiped out precious, irreplaceable brain cells. But over the past five, ten, twenty years, all that's changed. Using fMRI and PET scanning technology, neuroscientists can now look deep inside the human brain and they've discovered that it's amazingly flexible, resilient, and plastic.

Pictures of the Mind: What the New Neuroscience Tells Us About Who We Are shows you what they've discovered and what it means to all of us. Through author Miriam Boleyn-Fitzgerald’s masterfully written narrative and use stunning imagery, you'll watch human brains healing, growing, and adapting to challenges. You'll gain powerful new insights into the interplay between environment and genetics, begin understanding how people can influence their own intellectual abilities and emotional makeup, and understand the latest stunning discoveries about coma and "locked-in" syndrome. You'll learn about the tantalizing discoveries that may lead to cures for traumatic brain injury, stroke, emotional disorders, PTSD, drug addiction, chronic pain, maybe even Alzheimer's. Boleyn-Fitzgerald shows how these discoveries are transforming our very understanding of the "self", from an essentially static entity to one that can learn and change throughout life and even master the art of happiness.

  • Best West
This book describes in very readable terms, the basic findings of recent research of the mind using fMRI imaging. Have you ever known someone that suffers (or has suffered) from anxiety disorders, coma, traumatic brain injuries? You need to look at this book! I picked it up on a whim and am so glad I did! This book does not give the "answers" but it explores research regarding the minds of "normal" people, those with Alzheimers, the aging mind, convicted criminals, teenagers, victims of traumatic brain injuries, etc. Absolutely fascinating and very informative! You will never look at people (especially "annoying" or "scary" people) the same after you read this!
  • Kadar
I highly recommend this book to anyone with a genuine interest in the latest research on the brain, that three pound tissue mass that controls our waking, sleeping, walking, talking, and thinking. From behavior and emotions to movement and memory, the brain is the master control center. While the book states that brain research is still in its baby stages, there's much more information available than there was even ten of fifteen years ago. Of particular interest was the material on supposedly brain dead people who are aware of their surroundings. Because of imaging techniques, doctors now know that even those who seem to be in a vegetative state can hear and understand conversations, even those chats that concern their own states of awareness. One patient later described his anxiety when hearing family members and doctors discuss his prognosis as though he didn't exist!

Also of interest to me were the sections on the brain's involvement in drug addiction and its serious medications in Alzheimer's Disease (AD). About the drug addiction section, I know have a better understanding of just why and how some drugs have such a grip on people. And as a person who had a grandmother with AD, I was both intrigued and scared by the latest in Alzheimer's research.

Although the book is technical, it's not so medically based and ponderous that a lay person with a degree of knowledge about the brain and biology couldn't understand it. In fact, I'd recommend it as "must-read" for anyone who has ever asked WHY? or HOW? When considering some of the basics of human behavior and mental processes.
  • Rarranere
Well written, deep and societally relevant. This work is packed with neurology and it's implications toward personal and social systems. It raises many interesting and potentially dangerous questions. Pretty great for steeped and decently versed amateur nerds.

An important topic covered is Neuro-plasticity, or the ability of neurons to be changed as learning occurs. Evidence of this exists through Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) which uses a magnetic field to align water molecules with / against the magnetic field of the brain and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in which a radioisotope is adhered to a bio-active chemical that then migrates to active regions of the brain.

The `Pictures of the Mind' are obtained through the aforementioned means. The authors then cover a few pertinent social and judicial issues with the tests that have been devised using the neurological measuring devices.

For instance:

Vegetative States - tests have been devised to show whether or not activity is occurring. At any given time there are between 25,000 and 35,000 `vegetative' persons in the US alone. Tests have been created that show whether or not a vegetative person can respond to stimuli occurring around them. If the neuro-imaging shows they can they are considered to suffer `Locked-In Syndrome' (LIS). If they are unresponsive the social issue of Doctor assisted suicide or mercy killing can then be raised.

Mindfulness / Meditation: Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) and Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) teach people to realize their lack of control upon the universe, people and certain situations. It is a letting go of control coupled with an astute awareness of one's bio-feedback while attempting to create Metta (unconditional love for oneself and others).

Mindfulness also attempts to get at the root of `happiness' (pleasure is fleeting). Leading a eudemonic lifestyle, one filled with purpose, growth and mastery greatly increases overall happiness. Interesting constructs of the brain at work include: the insula (integrates emotion and the physical feelings associated to the emotion), left prefrontal cortex (gauges positive states of mind), the dorsal striatum (activity relates to # of dopaminergic synapses, also related to gene: Taq1a1), and the amygdala (negative emotion center of the `old brain').

Addiction: 40-60% of susceptibility can be delegated to genetics. In 1956 addiction was considered a `disease', it greatly effects the judgment centers of the brain (prefrontal & orbito-frontal cortices) but interestingly if the insula is damaged an individual often finds addicting habits easy to break.

Pain: The rostra anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) is designed to moderate pain and focus attention.

The authors also discuss legal issues regarding fMRI and PET scans that will likely be used in courts and judicial proceedings as they become more bonafide. For instance, will we soon know what `crazy' looks like using radioisotopes? How can underdevelopment be legally punished? Is a neuro-image a violation of the 5th amendment against self-incrimination?

A few other items of interest to myself:

`The Dark Network' - the spaces on an fMRI that show zero activity when we're actively engaged and focused upon an external stimulus, but once we've returned to day-dreaming or pondering our past / future it lights up.

Amyeloid plaques and tangles generally form in the `dark network'. Here, in other words, is where Alzheimer's Disease gets it's progressive, degenerative start. As many as 4.5 million Americans suffer Alzheimer's in some form. The development of Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB), a dye that attaches to early forming plaques may offer a means to keep that number, at least, stable.

Memory erasure is possible. PKMzeta & Alpha-CaMKII when used to over-express the protein in rats during recall have been shown to eliminate memories. This raises quite the ethics / metaphysical question - would you want your memories removed? Even the bad ones that make you `you'? What if this were forced upon you, say a soldier with PTSD?
  • Beardana
I found this book very interesting and thought-provoking. I wondered when my mother was in a coma prior to her death in 1966 whether or not she knew I was there with her and if she could hear what I was saying. After reading this book, I now believe that she was aware of much of what was going on around her even while she was in a coma.

The neuro-imaging technology will probably be used to help us in ways we hadn't thought possible. The author points out that we must be careful, though, not to carry the possibilities too far and make serious ethical mistakes.

It was difficult for me to follow the pictures of the brain scans on my Kindle. I like being able to choose my font and my font size on my Kindle, and I like the idea of saving trees; but trying to skip back to the narrative about the pictures was not the best way for me to learn about the scans. For that part of the book, I would have preferred holding a book with paper pages in my hands.

I think I found only one typo in the book, and it was very minor.

Thank you, Beatles (yes, the singing group) for making the CT scanners possible through the donation from your recording company.