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by Ulrika Jonsson

Download Honest eBook
ISBN:
0330411748
Author:
Ulrika Jonsson
Category:
Arts & Literature
Language:
English
Publisher:
Pan Books (May 16, 2003)
Pages:
544 pages
EPUB book:
1598 kb
FB2 book:
1358 kb
DJVU:
1210 kb
Other formats
mobi lrf azw docx
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
944


FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Four years ago, at the age of thirty-two, Ulrika found her life hitting rock bottom.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. She was facing a situation every parent dreads - her unborn child had been diagnosed with a life-threatening condition. At the age of thirty-two, Ulrika Jonsson found her life hitting rock-bottom.

Eva Ulrika Jonsson (born 16 August 1967) is a United Kingdom-based Swedish television presenter and model. After working as a secretary, Jonsson began her television career on TV-am in 1989, as a weather presenter on Good Morning, Britain. From 12 September 1989, she was also the weather presenter for Swedish TV3, broadcasting from London

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Honest by Ulrika Jonsson (Paperback, 2003) . Good Condition: A book that has been read, but is in good condition. Minimal damage to the book cover eg. scuff marks, but no holes or tears.

Good Condition: A book that has been read, but is in good condition. If this is a hard cover, the dust jacket may be missing. Binding has minimal wear. The majority of pages are undamaged with some creasing or tearing, and pencil underlining of text, but this is minimal. No highlighting of text, no writing in the margins, and no missing pages.

Used availability for Ulrika Jonsson's Honest.

If I’m honest, getting another divorce age 51 is not where I thought I would be, so who knows? I just don’t know what . Then again, I’ve said I will never marry again before, and I did. Who are Ulrika Jonsson's other ex husbands?

If I’m honest, getting another divorce age 51 is not where I thought I would be, so who knows? I just don’t know what shape my future will take. I can’t contemplate dating again. Who are Ulrika Jonsson's other ex husbands? Ulrika has been married three times.

Her autobiography, Honest, was a bestseller in 2003.

Is a death in the family the chance for a new start? When Myrtle's husband, Austin, dies on the bus one morning, everything seems to freeze. Ulrika Jonsson is the Swedish born television presenter and media personality who won 2009's Celebrity Big Brother. Her autobiography, Honest, was a bestseller in 2003. For the latest books, recommendations, offers and more.

New listing Ulrika Jonsson Book titled Honest.

Four years ago, at the age of thirty-two, Ulrika found her life hitting rock bottom. She was facing a situation every parent dreads - her unborn child had been diagnosed with a life-threatening condition. And what's more, she was facing it alone. She already had a son to look after, and a demanding career, but now her responsibilities were even greater than she had imagined. How would she cope, who had she become, and who was she to start with? As a way of trying to understand herself and her life, Ulrika started to write. It was a difficult, sometimes humiliating experience as she faced up to past mistakes. But she also rediscovered many amazing experiences from which there were powerful lessons to be learned. It's a story in turn funny, sad, rude, surprising - even shocking. But it's not just Ulrika's story - there are many aspects to it with which we will all identify. And it's honest. 'A disarmingly frank confession of weaknesses and fears' Independent
  • Ielonere
Ulrika Jonsson is one of those celebrities mainly known on her own territory -- namely, the U.K. That gives American readers of her autobiography, "Honest," a chance to take her as she is, without tabloids and rumors tainting it. Unfortunately, "Honest" as she is, the portrait she paints is not flattering at all.

She was born into a troubled Swedish family that disintegrated, mainly because of her father's philandering -- a trait that she began copying when she got married. Though her husband forgave her, and they soon had a son, Ulrika dumped him in favor of a muscle-bound Gladiator.

As this was going on, Ulrika's star was rising in the world, resulting in a weathergirl job, commercials, hostings and her own show. But she was in a series of bad relationships, with a crazed footballer, a cold-hearted German, and Britain's most famous coach. Then she found that her unborn daughter Bo had a serious heart defect that might kill her.

The final eighth of the book is perhaps the most compelling -- Ulrika struggling to be a single mom, without emotional support, while her daughter is undergoing one surgery after another. Despite the lackluster prose of her biography, it's a moving story that gives the heartstrings a little tug.

Unfortunately, the decisions that led her to that problem make Ulrika look dim and selfish. She apparently believes any absurd story she's told, such as "my ex-girlfriend lives with me, but only to houseclean." And it's hard to sympathize with her string of disastrous relationships, when she dumped a sweet, tender, loving Mr. Right so she could play the field with Bad Boys. Ulrika repeatedly tries to justify her infidelity by claiming that she couldn't help it -- that it was inevitable. Uh-huh, sure.

Ulrika also has the disturbing tendency to dehumanize anyone she doesn't like -- she refers to an abusive ex as "Mr. C" for a long while, and later disdainfully refers to her lover Sven's girlfriend as "the Italian." Not her name, Nancy Dell'Olio. "The Italian," like a character from a bad gothic novel.

On the flip side, she seems to retain a bizarre adoration for her abusive ex-boyfriends, including one who kicked her in the head, and another who abandoned her with a newborn baby. Additionally, there's a near-obsession with her children. At one point, she flips out because she might have to spend a week or two away from her son.

While the story about her critically ill daughter is a winner, the rest of Ulrika's story is a string of grating affairs -- affairs that a smarter woman would have avoided. "Honest" makes Ulrika seem like a real person... but sadly, it's a shallow person with no backbone and poor taste in men.
  • Jube
Ulrika Jonsson is one of those celebrities mainly known on her own territory -- namely, the U.K. That gives American readers of her autobiography, "Honest," a chance to take her as she is, without tabloids and rumors tainting it. Unfortunately, "Honest" as she is, the portrait she paints is not flattering at all.

She was born into a troubled Swedish family that disintegrated, mainly because of her father's philandering -- a trait that she began copying when she got married. Though her husband forgave her, and they soon had a son, Ulrika dumped him in favor of a muscle-bound Gladiator.

As this was going on, Ulrika's star was rising in the world, resulting in a weathergirl job, commercials, hostings and her own show. But she was in a series of bad relationships, with a crazed footballer, a cold-hearted German, and Britain's most famous coach. Then she found that her unborn daughter Bo had a serious heart defect that might kill her.

The final eighth of the book is perhaps the most compelling -- Ulrika struggling to be a single mom, without emotional support, while her daughter is undergoing one surgery after another. Despite the lackluster prose of her biography, it's a moving story that gives the heartstrings a little tug.

Unfortunately, the decisions that led her to that problem make Ulrika look dim and selfish. She apparently believes any absurd story she's told, such as "my ex-girlfriend lives with me, but only to houseclean." And it's hard to sympathize with her string of disastrous relationships, when she dumped a sweet, tender, loving Mr. Right so she could play the field with Bad Boys. Ulrika repeatedly tries to justify her infidelity by claiming that she couldn't help it -- that it was inevitable. Uh-huh, sure.

Ulrika also has the disturbing tendency to dehumanize anyone she doesn't like -- she refers to an abusive ex as "Mr. C" for a long while, and later disdainfully refers to her lover Sven's girlfriend as "the Italian." Not her name, Nancy Dell'Olio. "The Italian," like a character from a bad gothic novel.

On the flip side, she seems to retain a bizarre adoration for her abusive ex-boyfriends, including one who kicked her in the head, and another who abandoned her with a newborn baby. Additionally, there's a near-obsession with her children. At one point, she flips out because she might have to spend a week or two away from her son.

While the story about her critically ill daughter is a winner, the rest of Ulrika's story is a string of grating affairs -- affairs that a smarter woman would have avoided. "Honest" makes Ulrika seem like a real person... but sadly, it's a shallow person with no backbone and poor taste in men.
  • Mardin
I enjoyed learning about her life, what her side of many press stories were. She is a beautiful woman, but that has haunted her when it comes to men taking advantage of her. She comes across as being a sad woman, who deep down just wants to be loved and cared for.

I enjoyed this book a lot