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Download 100 Voices: An Oral History of Ayn Rand eBook

by Scott McConnell

Download 100 Voices: An Oral History of Ayn Rand eBook
ISBN:
0451231309
Author:
Scott McConnell
Category:
Arts & Literature
Language:
English
Publisher:
Berkley; Original edition (November 2, 2010)
Pages:
656 pages
EPUB book:
1158 kb
FB2 book:
1669 kb
DJVU:
1596 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
324


Xviii, 638 p. ; 23 cm. Interviews conducted between 1996 and 2003 with Ayn Rand's family members, friends, and associates are arranged by decades, from the 1910s through the 1980s.

Xviii, 638 p. Includes bibliographical references and index. The Ayn Rand Oral History Program began in April 1996 as a project of the Ayn Rand Archives, a department of the Ayn Rand Institute"-Pref.

Drawing on 100 ed interviews, Scott McConnell presents a unique portrait of a larger-than-life literary giant and a fascinating individual, Ayn Rand.

An extensive collection of ed interviews reflecting. Drawing on 100 ed interviews, Scott McConnell presents a unique portrait of a larger-than-life literary giant and a fascinating individual, Ayn Rand. Focusing on the private Rand, McConnell talked to the author's family, friends, fans, and An extensive collection of ed interviews reflecting on Ayn Rand's life and character.

Like many young people in the late 1950s and 1960s, I became interested in Ayn Rand's books while serving in the . Navy (1959-1963), reading the Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged. After the service I worked a full time job while going to college at night. I not only read every book she wrote, I also attended the Nathanel Brandon's lectures on Objectivism when they came to Chicago.

An extensive collection of ed interviews reflecting on Ayn Rand's life and character  .

100 Voices - Scott McConnell.

100 Voices: An Oral History of Ayn Rand. 100 Voices - Scott McConnell.

Author:McConnell, Scott. Book Binding:Paperback. Book Condition:VERYGOOD. Country of Publication. Each month we recycle over . million books, saving over 12,500 tonnes of books a year from going straight into landfill sites. Read full description. See details and exclusions.

Drawing on one hundred ed interviews, Scott McConnell presents a unique portrait of Ayn Rand, a larger-than-life literary figure and a provocative individual.

McConnell, Scott, "Martin Anderson," 100 Voices: an Oral History of Ayn Rand, 2010, New American Library, pp. 264–267. Starr, Paul (August 9, 1992). Pummeling the Professors". Retrieved 2009-03-15. Wills, Garry (May 15, 1988). All the President's Men".

An extensive collection of never-before-published interviews reflecting on Ayn Rand's life and character. Drawing on 100 never-before-published interviews, Scott McConnell presents a unique portrait of a larger-than-life literary giant and a fascinating individual, Ayn Rand. Focusing on the private Rand, McConnell talked to the author's family, friends, fans, and associates, as well as Hollywood stars, university professors, fiction writers, and many more. Arranged in chronological order, these interviews cover a broad range of years, contexts, relationships, and observations on one of the most influential- and controversial-figures of the twentieth century. From Ayn Rand's youngest sister to the woman who inspired the character of Peter Keating in The Fountainhead, the subjects interviewed offer fresh, sometimes surprisingly candid, affectionate, and intriguing insights into a complex and remarkable writer, philosopher, and human being.
  • Haal
This is the primary source material for one of the smears against Ayn Rand, that she opposed government welfare programs, but when she got old, the money ran out on her and she "grabbed" Social Security benefits. Anyone who believes this story should actually read the interview. Her LAWYER (not her social worker as the smear says) had to talk her into handing over power of attorney on the matter.

Also, do an internet search for "Classically Liberal Ayn Rand Social Security".
  • Bremar
Like many young people in the late 1950s and 1960s, I became interested in Ayn Rand's books while serving in the U.S. Navy (1959-1963), reading the Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged. After the service I worked a full time job while going to college at night. I not only read every book she wrote, I also attended the Nathanel Brandon's lectures on Objectivism when they came to Chicago. I also subscribed to their newsletters at that time. What makes this book so fasinating are the many people she influenced in some way and the close personal experiences these people had with her and her husband. I learned so much in this book that I did not know about Ayn Rand in the past.

The interviews cover the years from 1910 to 1980, some of the people were relatives, friends, people who typed her material, book publishers, producers, writers and educators. Most of the people you will not recognize, but there are also famous people like actresses Patricia Neal and Raquel Welch. I also found out not only was she a fan of Mickey Spillane, but they were very good friends as well. This is a huge volume of 638 pages and I enjoyed reading every page. This book is a revealing look at the personal side of the founder of Objectivism. Looking back at the theme of "Atlas Shrugged" it seems today in America we are at the cross roads between freedom and capitalism or big government and slavery. The late Ayn Rand would be horrified at our present political course.

In conclusion, this is a book every fan of Ayn Rand should read. Finally, the price is a real bargain.

Rating: 5 Stars. Joseph J. Truncale (Author: Never Trust a Politician: A critical review of politics and politicians)
  • Todal
Great book, no problems with delivery.
  • Celen
Back when this first came out, I just did a skim-through for the most interesting interviews, and thought it was pretty good because there are several. But when I went back and read it all the way through, I was seriously disappointed.

Most of the book is filled with material that you either might already know, or have no good reason to want to. A lot of it is interviews with distant relatives or autograph-seeking fans who only met Ayn Rand on perhaps one occasion, and repeat ad nauseum how invariably kind she was to children and strangers (presumably included to soften her supposedly harsh image as spread by a couple of cranks, which is second-handed and insulting to the reader's intelligence). There's even an interview with her dentist, discussing her attitude toward visiting him (she disliked it, but knew it was in her long-range interest---isn't that *everyone's* attitude toward visiting the dentist?!). A lot of meaningless blather like that. What was the purpose in including interviews of people whose (sometimes vague) recollections don't add much if anything of worth to our understanding of her? Just that 100 is such a nice round number? (Although neither the number of interviews nor of interviewees is actually 100---I counted, and they are 97 and 105 respectively.)

It's interesting, there are even stories about her in the book that make it clear she wouldn't have approved of it---for instance, about how she didn't like being photographed with her glasses on, because at the time that would have detracted from her image as a serious philosopher. But much of the book (like the dentist thing) amounts precisely to "photographing her with her glasses on."

To put it another way, half of the material in the book is exactly the kind of material that wouldn't make it into a fictionalized account of Ayn Rand's life, or even a proper biography. Some might say that's precisely the virtue of the present volume, but that attitude seems to rest on the premise that it is proper to be interested in every mundane aspect of her life. I can only think of two motives for that attitude---first, the desire to "humanize" (in the worst sense of the word) a larger-than-life figure and bring her down to the level of the common herd (perhaps best expressed by the phrase, "She puts her pants on one leg at a time just like everybody else"); or, as is more likely in this case, the exaggeration of the importance of every trivial detail of the life of someone one admires (similar to the error said to have been made by some early followers of Ayn Rand in dying their hair orange in a misguided attempt to be more like Roark). The latter is more understandable and forgivable, but no less misguided.

(Even the organization of the book, supposedly roughly chronological, seems a bit hodgepodge or at least very rough indeed---a few interviews appear to have been placed in the wrong decade entirely for no apparent reason.)

All that said, there are some interesting interviews---mostly those toward the end with people who knew her fairly well, or exhibit the proper attitude and actually have some interesting things to say (like Allan Gotthelf), or ones in which the interviewee is of interest in his own right (such as Mickey Spillane). And even some of the trivial details do give a fuller picture of Ayn Rand as thinker and valuer. But a lot of it is repetitious at best, and some of it doesn't seem first-handed in motivation (and here I'm not necessarily criticizing the interviewees, but the interviewer/editor).

So on the whole I'm not sure if the project was ill-conceived or just ill-executed, but at best the book should have been half its present length. I guess what my criticism boils down to is that McConnell seems not to have consistently employed any standard of importance to guide his interview questions and final selection of material, and to the extent that there do seem to be some rough standards of selection, they seem improper. Of course, this is just my first impression on an initial reading, so if you disagree I'm open to counterarguments. But you might want to just pick it up from the library and skim it for the interesting interviews. And of course, this is just my opinion, so you may well disagree---and if you checked it out from the library and really liked it, you could decide then whether you want to spend the money to buy your own copy or not. Anyway, that's my advice.

I hope and trust that Shoshana Milgram's forthcoming biography will be better than this. And as for interviewed recollections of Ayn Rand, the Sures' book was better as far as I can remember.
  • Ochach
I found this volume to be much more enjoyable and enlightening than anticipated. Having read most of what Ayn Rand wrote and having been in and around the Objectivist community since 1982, the year Ms. Rand passed away, I still discovered a great deal herein that was new to me -- a cornucopia of refreshing, nuanced, forthright perspectives on one of the greatest minds and fascinating characters in history.
  • Danrad
After reading all the criticisms of Ayn Rand, it certainly was a pleasure to find out that most people who knew her, thought she was a kind, generous and loving person. Each interview reveals the way that Ayn Rand dealt with the people in her life. There is only one word to really describe her personality as seen by others: "magnanimous."
  • Shalizel
This collection of interviews is the most interesting book-length look at Rand to come out since Barbara Branden's 1986 biography, Passion of Ayn Rand. Many anecdotes were brand-new to me, and I believe the voices and perspectives of the many interviewees have been well and truly captured. If you like Ayn Rand even a little, you'll like this book a lot. If you dislike Rand, maybe this book will change your mind. I love what Mickey Spillane, Robert Stack, Alvin Toffler, a Playboy publicist and many others have to say about her. Even Rand's estranged sister Nora, whose relationship with Ayn ended badly after a decades-long hiatus (and who refused to speak to Barbara Branden in the early 80s), was successfully coaxed into providing many interesting details about her memories of a once-beloved sibling.
As a lover of Ayn Rand writings, I have enjoyed reading other peoples estimate of her. She never really got a decent break from her reviewers during her lifetime.