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Download How I Got This Way eBook

by Regis Philbin

Download How I Got This Way eBook
ISBN:
0062109790
Author:
Regis Philbin
Category:
Arts & Literature
Language:
English
Publisher:
HarperLuxe; Larger Print edition (December 6, 2011)
Pages:
448 pages
EPUB book:
1252 kb
FB2 book:
1259 kb
DJVU:
1235 kb
Other formats
mbr mobi txt rtf
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
844


Ships from and sold by big river books. Read it hoping to get to know the guy in a deeper way than what you get on TV, and you will be disappointed. It really hit me when I read the chapter about George Clooney.

How I Got This Way book. Instead of a chronological memoir, Philbin structures his book around stories of people who influenced his life and career. Each chapter ends with what he learned from each individual, including Lou Holtz, Kathy Lee Gifford, George Clooney, Kelly Ripa, Donald Trump and more.

There’s never been a morning for as long as I can remember-at least over the last fifteen or more years-when Dean hasn’t sung to me both before and after every single one of our Live! broadcasts course, I’ve talked about him e. .

There’s never been a morning for as long as I can remember-at least over the last fifteen or more years-when Dean hasn’t sung to me both before and after every single one of our Live! broadcasts course, I’ve talked about him every chance I’ve had during our Host Chats, but what you probably don’t know is that I’ve kept his music playing almost constantly whenever working upstairs in my office above our studio. In fact, people have called my office a shrine to both Dean and Notre Dame, and I guess that’s pretty much the truth

On Friday, Regis Philbin will step down from his hosting duties on the talk show Live with Regis and Kelly. In his new memoir, How I Got This Way, Philbin chronicles the twists and turns of his career and explains where he plans to go next.

On Friday, Regis Philbin will step down from his hosting duties on the talk show Live with Regis and Kelly. But that doesn't mean he's retiring. Regis Philbin Explains How He 'Got This Way'.

How I Got This Way. 0 5 Author: Regis Philbin Narrator: Regis . 0 5 Author: Regis Philbin Narrator: Regis Philbin. One of the most popular television and cultural icons ever, Regis Philbin has been entertaining television audiences for more than fifty years-as a beloved morning-show host (Live with Regis and Kelly), a nighttime game-show host (Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?) and also as a fixture on national and local late-night talk shows.

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One of the most popular television and cultural icons ever, Regis Philbin has been entertaining television audiences for more than fifty years—as a beloved morning-show host (Live with Regis and Kelly), a nighttime game-show host (Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?) and also as a fixture on national and local late-night talk shows. The irrepressible “Reege” has regaled television audiences with his stories for more than half a century, but he’s saved the most hilarious, surprising, heartfelt, and inspiring tales for How I Got This Way. Both a fascinating show business memoir and a delightful primer for living the good life rolled into one, How I Got This Way is Reege being Reege, just the way we love him, as he shares the secrets to success and happiness that he has learned from his innumerable celebrity encounters, his close, personal friendships, and, of course,  his relationship with his loving wife and family.
  • Asher
The structure for this book is cleverly focused around 30 individuals who were chronologically pivotal in Regis' life. There appears to be no ghost writer, and it reads as if one were dining out with Mr. Philbin and listening to many of his personal recollections but in more detail than you would ever get from television. The 30 individuals represent a relatively wide range of people and each "story" could be its own short story. Letterman's foreward is a perfectly irreverent snippet of amusement.

For those of you who are Regis fans, I suggest this book is an excellent way to ease yourself away from any withdrawal symptoms! It's fun to read and insightful as well. The chapter devoted to an astrologist was superfluous as anyone could have predicted failure for anyone following the multi-talented Steve Allen. I do now, however, understand why he checks his astrology predictions!

Regis' homage to Dean Martin is touching as he remains an unabashed fan of Dino. Joey Bishop, deservedly, doesn't fare so well though Regis is far kinder to that explosive sourpuss than most anyone else would be considering the way Bishop treated him. You'll also realize what a sweet guy Don Rickles is!
  • Wooden Purple Romeo
First, you don't have to love Regis to like this book. It's not a typical chronological autobiography. Rather, he devotes a chapter to each of the important people in his life and tells stories related to each. Then, at the end of each chapter he wraps it up by saying what he learned, or how he was changed from knowing that person. Even difficult times and difficult people taught him valuable lessons, and I appreciated that insight and reminder that who we are is a reflection of the people that we are around.
  • นℕĨĈტℝ₦
I really loved this book! I ESPECIALLY enjoyed how, at the end of each chapter, the author put in his thoughts on what lessons he learned from each different experience in his life; it made it very personal. It also put each chapter in better perspective and I found myself thinking over things in my life and how there are more positive ways of looking at each event in one's life. This is a very uplifting, at times humorous, and definitely an entertaining read. Also, since Regis is a big Notre Dame fan, there is a lot of football dialogue, too!
  • Macill
I must say I was a tad let down by this book, I guess he's so animated on TV, that it left me wanting more of his honest, silliness. I respect Reeg especially his very long career, which he generously credits to many, many people. I was shocked that there was no mention at all of Michael Gelman, who he teased for so many years on LIVE TV. It was OK, and he was kind to give many folks so much credit for his hard work, and I guess the title really sums up the direction of his book. Nevertheless, I still miss seeing ole Reeg in the mornings with my coffee!
  • EROROHALO
Regis Philbin has enjoyed a fine life as one of America's foremost television personalities, but very little of it filters into this 2011 memoir recounting his career successes and the famous people he has known. Read it hoping to get to know the guy in a deeper way than what you get on TV, and you will be disappointed.

As other reviewers noted, there's something off in reading Philbin versus listening to him on television. It really hit me when I read the chapter about George Clooney. In it, Philbin writes about visiting the actor's villa on Lake Como, Italy, about the fine wines and the great conversation they shared, how Philbin worried he bored Clooney but later learned from a mutual friend that Clooney regarded Philbin's visit fondly. And that's pretty much it, other than that George is a pretty swell-looking fellow, which I already knew.

Reading this, I realized what was off. Philbin telling a story on television makes you feel like you are there with him. It's a gift he has. But it doesn't carry over in print, where Philbin's chatty ebullience is replaced by often leaden prose. As a result, in "How I Got This Way," Philbin comes off as bragging about his exclusive access to a world I'll never know. Of course he is, but that's easier to ignore when the guy is telling you about it on screen, face-to-face as it were, with his friendly smile and big hand gestures.

"How I Got This Way" is organized into thirty chapters, each focusing on a person or people, usually a celebrity, who inspired or affected Philbin in some way. A select few actually make for good reading. Joey Bishop was the host of a talk show in the 1960s where Philbin worked as a second banana, and proved a difficult colleague at times. Philbin recounts this difficulty in amusing, amiable style. Jack Paar, a more recognized TV talk-show host of the 1950s and 1960s, had a friendly mentoring relationship with Philbin which positively impacted Philbin's career. Philbin writes about Paar with real warmth and humor.

You wish this carried over to the rest of the text. More often, though, like with Clooney, the purpose of the chapter seems more like chest-pounding, in an unctuous, "look-who-I-know" sort of way. He takes in a Los Angeles Lakers game with Jack Nicholson or spends a few minutes talking baseball in the stands with Joe DiMaggio. One chapter, on former Notre Dame football coach Lou Holtz, overflows with such hero worship you'd think he was writing about Buddha or Christ. If you finish the book knowing one thing, it's what college Philbin went to.

The book's weakest affectation is his closing thoughts on each person, "What I Took Away From It All," which offers anodyne comments around the idea of appreciating the good in others and so on in the form of "life lessons." It all reads like logrolling, because that's pretty much what it is, and very shallow to boot.

In sum, "How I Got This Way" is a disappointing ego trip disguised as a memoir, just good enough in places to make you wish the guy had really tried.
  • Quamar
I was very disappointed in this book. He told many of the stories I had heard him tell on his TV show. When I purchased it I thought I would read about his marriages, children and his life. He takes different people he has met along the way and devotes a chapter to them. I would not recommend this book.
  • Hawk Flying
I really thought this book was a complete waste of my time. I got maybe 1/2 into it and thought he isn't telling us anything of his life or family. This man is very shallow because he didn't tell anything about his life in depth just career. You don't care about him. Don't read this if you want to know something about him. He hardly mentioned his family etc. Hummmm
I got this book because it was cheaply priced and I wanted to read about Regis. The chapters are divided into his encounters and relationships with many famous people that he has known and who have influenced him in his career. He has a "takeaway" statement at the end of each chapter which is encouraging and upbeat. This is a pretty good read for those who like to reminisce about the good ol' days.