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Download The bend for home eBook

by Dermot Healy

Download The bend for home eBook
ISBN:
186046081X
Author:
Dermot Healy
Category:
Arts & Literature
Language:
English
Publisher:
Harvill Press; First Edition edition (1996)
Pages:
307 pages
EPUB book:
1612 kb
FB2 book:
1980 kb
DJVU:
1251 kb
Other formats
doc azw lrf mobi
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
363


Further praise for The Bend for Home: ‘This is a marvellous book, satisfying on just about every one of its many diverting and artful levels. Anthony Clare, Sunday Times.

Further praise for The Bend for Home: ‘This is a marvellous book, satisfying on just about every one of its many diverting and artful levels. The bend for home, which gives rise to many place names in Ireland, as for example Corballa, Corbellagh, etc.

Dermot Healy was a poet, novelist and dramatist. He lived in County Sligo and was the author of A Goat's Song, Sudden Times, The Bend for Home and Long Time, No See. He won the Hennessy Award (twice), the Tom Gallon Award, the Encore Award and the AWB Vincent American Ireland Fund Literary Award. Бібліографічна інформація.

Dermot Healy (9 November 1947 – 29 June 2014) was an Irish novelist, playwright, poet and short story writer. A member of Aosdána, Healy was also part of its governing body, the Toscaireacht. Born in Finea, County Westmeath, he lived in County Sligo, and was described variously as a "master", a "Celtic Hemingway" and as "Ireland's finest living novelist"

Every so often Packie Cullen would send a beam of torchlight over faces from which childhood was fast fading, or had already gone. Being adult meant groping in the dark.

Every so often Packie Cullen would send a beam of torchlight over faces from which childhood was fast fading, or had already gone. Being adult meant groping in the dark soft as the men on the balcony held in their gasps, and let go, afterwards, with a sigh. From the back row came the moist slap of a kiss. As Orna Galligan loosened her hair and leaned back on Kit Finnegan’s arm her white knee dug into the back of my seat. Des Hickey threw his coat over Ursula Smith’s lap and turned round with a stern eye. What are you looking at? he barked.

The Bend For Home book. Most of the book deals with Dermot Healy’s childhood and teenage years; the time when others looked after him, or tried to do so. The last section of the book tells of the time when Healy took care of his now elderly mother and aunt and life has gone full circle. He whose antics had been frowned upon but lovingly dealt with, now finds himself having to find the same patience while he looks after two strong minded but no longer able bodied women.

Dermot Healy's "Bend for Home" is part "Portrait of the Artist" and part "Angela's Ashes," combining the ambient grey of Irish poverty with characteristic Irish humor. Healy has been criticized for betraying his mother's memory in the book's sometimes hilarious, sometimes wrenching last chapter.

Bend for Home, The. Healy, Dermot. The free online library containing 450000+ books. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device. Bend for Home, The. Read online. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

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com's Dermot Healy Author Page. The Bend For Home: A Memoir by Healy Dermot (1998-03-15) Hardcover Jan 1, 1803.

Authors : Healy, Dermot. Product Category : Books. One day, years after he's moved away from his childhood home in rural Ireland, Dermot Healy returns to care for his ailing mother. There is no-one in the office at the Weekend. Out of the blue she hands him the forgotten diary he had kept as a fifteen-year-old. He is amazed to find the makings of the writer he has become, as well as taken aback at the changes his memory has wrought.

Signed by the Author, 1st edition, Fine in Fine, mylar covered DJ. Top edge has a faint sprinkle of spotting.
  • ChallengeMine
Great read.
  • Blackseeker
Excellent service with goods arriving well before due date.Condition of purchase, 2nd hand book, better than expected for a second hand book.
Billy S
  • from earth
I first found Healy in an indirect fashion, which often turns out to be the best way.

While searching for information on an upcoming RTE documentary on the Irish in NY, I noticed a reference to the filmmaker's previous work "The Writing in the Sky", which is about Dermot Healy. I found the film online ([...]) and watched a portion of the program.

That evening I picked up a copy of Healy's The Bend for Home and ended up carrying it with me until I finished it. I found it an evocative combination of memory and place and it was an interesting journey.

As someone who experienced the loss of my father when I was quite young, Healy's description of his father and their relationship was quite touching. The same goes for his depiction of caring for his mother at the end of her life - I saw another reviewer mentioned that Healy was criticized for that part of the memoir and I cannot see how one would feel that was a problem.

Her story at that point in her life seems to me presented as a contrast to the personality he writes of in her earlier life; how those traits remained in later life and how the loss of his mother could be tracked by the changes in her abilities in relation to her fastidious temperament.

My only complaint was some difficulty in navigating through the center portion of the memoir, as he jumped into the more diarist format and wrote of his adolescent and often self-destructive behavior. However, after sticking with him during that section I see there exists an optimism there as he sometimes tries to temper his wide swath of troublesome activity and shows some insight into the deeper thoughts of identity his young self was having.

Overall, I would highly recommend this book for those looking for a memoir of time and place told from an honest perspective. There is pain, but there is humor and beauty too.

I am now going back to watch The Writing in the Sky again. I'm interested on how it plays to me now with a little more knowledge of Dermot Healy himself.
  • Gaxaisvem
The Bend For Home - A Memoir by Dermot Healy

Memoirs fall into two types - those which delineate extraordinary lives or those which are so well written that the ordinary is transformed. The Bend For Home is of the second category. With a volume of poetry and a few novels to his credit, notably A Goat's Song, Dermot Healy has decided to turn his clear-sighted gaze upon himself.

Of course, it is the self which is the source of all writing, but autobiography - though it may draw from the same well as fiction - is different. It demands bravery. As Healy says, fiction can be a "receptacle for those truths we would rather not allow into our tales of the self."

One of the central themes of this autobiography is how we remember; how not just fiction, but all art, relies on artifice. As illustration he quotes the song Come Back Paddy Reilly to Ballyjamesduff, by Percy French, the road engineer. One of the lines goes: "Just turn to the left at the bridge of Finea." But, Healy points out, you cannot turn left at the bridge of Finea. "Even road engineers," he concludes, "are capable of giving wrong directions in order to get a couplet true... Language, to be memorable, dispenses with accuracy."

So how accurate can a memoir be? In this work, Healy strives for the truth about his life and what he perceives as its meaning. At one point he writes of how "nostalgia steals material from the same source as fiction and then leaves the reality wanting." The reality is never wanting in The Bend For Home, and through his story of bereavement, rebellion, drink, drugs, love, decay and death, nostalgia - and its sickly cousin, sentimentality - are scrupulously avoided.

But is that enough? What is truth anyway, and how is it revealed? Healy recounts one cringe-inducing memory of his to reveal the interconnectedness of truth and lies in our lives, especially remembered lives. He returns from London to Cavan for a wedding and lies to the editor of the Anglo-Celt, telling him that a play of his is to be broadcast by ITV. Back in Piccadilly, having forgotten all about the play he's never written, a Cavan friend shows him the front page of the Anglo-Celt, which carries his picture under the headline: "Cavan Author Finds Fame."

His friends show it to everybody they know and as they set him questions, he is drawn further in. "The more of the story I invented, the more real it became." Eventually, he extricates himself with another untruth about production difficulties. Had he not lied about being a writer, however, he believes he may never have become one: "The truth is the lie you once told returning to haunt you."

It is typical of Healy's writing that, apart from one reference to how he would "wake out of a dream terror-stricken by my duplicity," he does not tell us how he felt throughout this time. As for his friends we are told only that "the date for the broadcast came and went [and] no one mentioned it." We are left to imagine the whisperings, the pity of those who believed him, the contempt of the sceptical.

In this leaving of gaps for the imagination to fill, as in his lyrical descriptions of Leitrim landscape and life, he resembles that other novelist of this part of the world, John McGahern. And, as with McGahern, it is sometimes difficult to see how Healy gets his effects. Often all he does is relate bald events, but the impact on the reader goes far beyond this, in the end into an emotional struggle with the meaning of life and death. Yes, the biggest of big themes are explored in this book, and explored with lyricism, wit, passion and tenderness.

The Bend For Home is a stunning achievement. It takes Dermot Healy's ordinary Irish life, and gives it shape, bends it if you like, into somethings that takes home the truth.
  • Rainbearer
In this bittersweet memoir about growing up and growing old, Dermot Healy explores the quality of memory, of tales told and heard and told again, of times half-remembered. Highly stylistic prose reflects the stream of human consciousness, where sometimes a leaf floats past and we think we recognize it as a leaf that floated past a year before. Dermot Healy's "Bend for Home" is part "Portrait of the Artist" and part "Angela's Ashes," combining the ambient grey of Irish poverty with characteristic Irish humor.
Healy has been criticized for betraying his mother's memory in the book's sometimes hilarious, sometimes wrenching last chapter. But it is one of the most touching accounts of a son and mother's last days together since I read Mark Spragg's "Where Rivers Change Direction." What would make his mother proud is knowing that Healy has become one of the first rank of Irish authors, and his account of her decline is a sad, beautiful piece of work.
Healy should be more widely read in America, if only because his is an original voice in a new key, Irish accent or not.