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Download 'scuse Me While I Kiss the Sky eBook

by David Henderson

Download 'scuse Me While I Kiss the Sky eBook
ISBN:
055337785X
Author:
David Henderson
Category:
Arts & Literature
Language:
English
Publisher:
Bantam; Bantam trade ed edition (March 1, 1996)
Pages:
496 pages
EPUB book:
1503 kb
FB2 book:
1650 kb
DJVU:
1780 kb
Other formats
lrf lit doc lrf
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
672


I'll keep my eyes out for that (though the long, impressionistic descriptions of Jimi's playing of various songs better not get any longer.

While the dated slang is distracting, the hero-worshipping approach to Hendrix is worse.

Greil Marcus called 'Scuse Me While I Kiss The Sky, 'The . Poet, musician, and college professor David Henderson took an unusual approach to the too short life of the greatest guitarist who ever lived: James Marshall Hendrix.

Greil Marcus called 'Scuse Me While I Kiss The Sky, 'The strongest and most ambitious biography yet written about any rock and roll performer,' which I can't agree with but, if you ask me, says a lot about a lot of things. He repeats himself, he jumps around like a little This was the first Hendrix bio I ever read, long, long ago. I remember finding it difficult to get through and this time around was no different.

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Originally published to great acclaim in 1978, ’Scuse Me While I Kiss the Sky was written by poet, scholar, and Hendrix friend David Henderson as a personal favor to Jimi. This most thorough update on the book in ten years is filled with brand-new photographs and fresh revelations.

David Henderson's biography of Jimi Hendrix, Jimi Hendrix: Voodoo Child of the Aquarian Age - first published .

David Henderson's biography of Jimi Hendrix, Jimi Hendrix: Voodoo Child of the Aquarian Age - first published in hardcover in 1978 - was described by Greil Marcus of Rolling Stone as "he strongest and most ambitious biography yet written about any rock and roll performer.

David Henderson's biography of Jimi Hendrix, Jimi Hendrix: Voodoo Child of the Aquarian Age - first published in hardcover in 1978 - was described by Greil Marcus of Rolling Stone as "he strongest and most ambitious biography yet written about any .

Biography of the remarkable rock musician.
  • Rare
AWESOME AWESOME AWESOME AWESOME AWESOME AWESOME AWESOME AWESOME AWESOME
  • Anazan
This is a terrible book and it came at the very last minute and the book wasn't even worth reading. I have read many biographies about Hendrix and this one was the worst so far.
  • Broadraven
David Eichelberger already wrote about one major weakness of this book in his review, though in Henderson's, umm, defense a lot of rock biographies written around the same time adopted a similar tone, cf. "No One Here Gets Out Alive," "Hammer of the Gods," and to a lesser extent, the Bob Marley bio by Timothy White (I think it's "Catch a Fire").

While the dated slang is distracting, the hero-worshipping approach to Hendrix is worse. Hendrix is either responsible for or happened to be within earshot of people talking about a lot of major developments in mid-1960s pop culture, including Eric Clapton's shift to Cream, Pete Townshend writing Tommy, Miles Davis getting into rock, etc. Yes, there is no denying that Hendrix was part of The Scene, and that he was part of the short-term changes happening in that scene, but without stronger evidence and attribution I'm not buying that Hendrix was the key nexus through which all of these changes were taking place. It takes a lot more than just one person to make change happen; Henderson's hagiographic presentation is simply untenable.

But the real deal killer here is the the omniscient third-person voice adopted by Henderson ("Jimi had not spent so much time with brothers in ages. He dug it."). You never really know if what you're reading is (a) something Hendrix said in an interview somewhere that Henderson has paraphrased, (b) something Hendrix said to a friend that Henderson has paraphrased, or (c) something Henderson imagines Jimi must have been thinking. No matter how you slice it, it comes up unreliable. You never know if what you're reading really is what Jimi thought or not.

That said, I give it two stars because it looks like Henderson at least got a lot of his facts right--at least if we are to trust the far superior 2006 Jimi bio by Charles Cross, "A Room Full of Mirrors," as a yardstick for cross-checking the data. Cross doesn't worry about being hip, just about putting down the facts (or at least the facts as the people he interviewed remember them as being) and letting Jimi speak in his own voice wherever possible. Cross is also good at comparing the different ways people remember the same event--something that doesn't seem to have occurred to Henderson as a thing to do. Nonetheless, amid all the bluster and jive talk, it is clear that Henderson did do a lot of research himself.

All in all, though, now that I've reread the Henderson book for the first time in about 20 years (found it buried in my storage space), I feel safe in saying that I have no reason to recommend to anyone other than the Hendrix completist, and that recommendation is pretty lukewarm. Get Cross' book instead if you want to know about Jimi's life and some of his musical influences. Get the CDs if you want to know about the music.

ADDITION: I see that this book is in fact a condensed version of a larger book that Henderson wrote called something like "Jimi Hendrix: Free Spirit of the Aquarian Age," a title that has not aged well. Apparently, the lack of interviews that I complain about in my review of this book here is a product of the cutting and chopping process Henderson went through to produce a shorter book that could be released as a mass-market paperback. Be that as it may, I can only judge by what THIS book is, not what it could have been. Henderson is said to be editing and updating the "Aquarian" book for new edition, to be released in 2007 or 2008. I'll keep my eyes out for that (though the long, impressionistic descriptions of Jimi's playing of various songs better not get any longer . . .).
  • Windbearer
This is probably the best book that's been written on Hendrix, but it's not among the best music biographies...just the best on Hendrix. I've read the book a couple times, and it does contain good information. Sadly, the good information is scattered between too much slang, '60's hip talk, and artificial seeming dialect.

As far as the information in the book, it is a pretty thorough look at Hendrix's short life. It includes a lot of good pictures, and more about his time in the Army than any other source I've read. It's not bad for that.

I just wish Henderson wouldn't have used so much dialect and slang. It spoiled the entire experience. It turned a good book into a mediocre one.
  • Dilkree
This was the first book I read about Hendrix when I was about 13 all of 20 years ago and I have always loved it, and often go back to read parts of it. It's not an accurate biography at all, and there is a certan amount of exaggeration for effect, but somehow it really captured my imagination. It just works really well as book. Henderson has a fair amount of talent as writer, he should have gone further and written a fictional novel based on Jimi's life as the inspiration where he could have taken much more licence-it would have been really wonderful.

For me as a teenager, although obviously quite mythologised, it was a real glimse into a sophisticated grown up world I never comprehended as school girl in the West Midlands in the early 1980's. You really feel as have you got inside Hendrix's head, and are able to appreciate some understanding as to what it was like to live in the ever fabled late 60's.

Hendrix's intimate friends after he made it, seemed so exotic and glamourous to me. This was not 12-year-olds girls and mudsharks, the women of his inner circle that surrounded him seemed so sassy, exotic, senuous, street smart and sexually free. They were grown up seriously well connected young women. These people were not crude boozers and drug abusers, these were connisseurs of fine herbs and substances who lived nocternal lives in fabulous richly drapped apartments and hotels suites far away from the 9-5 grind of the real world. It also seemed such a very creative colourful world with Hendrix not only creating his own music but jamming and creating music with many other notable musicians that came to town. It's probably a complete load of rubbish-but it created a wonderful mystic and I loved it.
  • Ueledavi
This book started off a little slow but after a few pages you got right into it. It was the inside-out details that got me turning the pages. From his remarkable preformance at Monterey with "the expierience" to his last months in his own recording studio "electric ladyland" with "band of gypsies." His life was filled with turns and dave henderson does a remarkable job writing in words what jimi has done with his guitar. It goes through jimi's childhood happyness to his adult acid adictions. Tripping left and right jimi hendrix brought us a sound we would never forget. After this book I will never forget jimi and as soon as you read it im sure you wont either!