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Download Black Stars: African American Women Scientists and Inventors eBook

by Jim Haskins,Otha Richard Sullivan

Download Black Stars: African American Women Scientists and Inventors eBook
ISBN:
047138707X
Author:
Jim Haskins,Otha Richard Sullivan
Category:
Ethnic & National
Language:
English
Publisher:
Wiley; 1 edition (October 12, 2001)
Pages:
160 pages
EPUB book:
1227 kb
FB2 book:
1457 kb
DJVU:
1264 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.7
Votes:
835


This book is about African American women scientists and inventors, a rarity indeed. Reportedly African Americans in general comprise . % of all science and engineering professionals today.

This book is about African American women scientists and inventors, a rarity indeed. So to read about the significant contributions of these pioneering women is both revealing and uplifting. Some of those profiled are somewhat well known;such as Madame C. J. Walker.

Sullivan once headed Detroit's program to infuse African American history into the public school curriculum

Sullivan once headed Detroit's program to infuse African American history into the public school curriculum. Here he profiles 25 black American woman who have made significant contributions to science and technology, explaining that many, many more are utterly unknown because first of legal bans on granting patents to slaves and later because of social constraints on women. His message to black school girls is that just because they have not heard of black women scientists does not mean that the profession is closed to them.

OTHA RICHARD SULLIVAN, E. is a former science teacher and middle school guidance counselor. He is also the author of African American Inventors (Wiley). As head of Detroit's program to infuse African American history into the public school curriculum, he instructed teachers on how to incorporate African American scientific history into their classes. He is also the author of African American Inventors (Wiley)

African American Women Scientists and Inventors. by James Haskins and Otha Richard Sullivan. Meet African american women of science and invention from the early years to modern Times Patricia Bath, . Miriam E. Benjamin Ursula Burns Alexa Canady, .

African American Women Scientists and Inventors. Jewel Plummer Cobb, P. Ellen F. Eglin Angela D. Ferguson, . Sara E. Goode Evelyn Boyd Granville, P. Dannellia Gladden Green, P. Bessie Blount Griffin Betty Wright Harris, P.

Start by marking African American Women Scientists and Inventors as. .

Start by marking African American Women Scientists and Inventors as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

It's about time! African American Women Scientists and Inventors by Dr. Otha Sullivan could not have been written at a more critical time.

By Otha Richard Sullivan. It's about time! African American Women Scientists and Inventors by Dr. At the dawn of the twenty-first century, we stand, again, at the crossroads with racism, race relations, and discrimination in our country. There is much talk about reparations, affirmative action, achievement gaps, and many other issues seething with racial overtones.

Charles Richard Drew, . Claude Harvard Shirley Ann Jackson, P. Frederick McKinley Jones Percy Lavon Julian, P. Ernest Everett Just, P. Lewis Howard Latimer Jan Earnst Matzeliger Elijah McCoy Benjamin Montgomery John P. Moon Garrett Augustus Morgan Norbert Rillieux Earl D. Shaw, P. Madame C. Walker Daniel Hale Williams, . Granville T. Woods Jane Cooke Wright, . For more than three centuries, African American inventors have been coming up with ingenious ideas .

African American inventors - Biography, African American scientists - Biography, African American women. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

The extraordinary journey of African-American inventors and scientists from the 19th and 20th centuries whose .

The extraordinary journey of African-American inventors and scientists from the 19th and 20th centuries whose inventions and discoveries have revolutionized the world. 1, 2, 3. Martin Luther King J. who received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964 for his non-violent campaign against racism, summarized the drive and strong will of African-Americans. From science to technology to agriculture and medicine, African-American men and women have empowered the global society and future generations of any race with their contributions and example. They continue to be an inspiration up to this day. He is also the author of African American Inventors (Wiley)

Meet African american women of science and invention from the early years to modern Times

Patricia Bath, M.D.Miriam E. BenjaminUrsula BurnsAlexa Canady, M.D.Jewel Plummer Cobb, Ph.D.Ellen F. EglinAngela D. Ferguson, M.D.Sara E. GoodeEvelyn Boyd Granville, Ph.D.Dannellia Gladden Green, Ph.D.Bessie Blount GriffinBetty Wright Harris, Ph.D.Shirley Ann Jackson, Ph.D. Aprille Joy Ericsson Jackson, Ph.D.Mae Jemison, M.D.Marjorie Stewart Joyner, Ph.D.Mary KennerReatha Clark King, Ph.D.Annie Turnbo MaloneMildred Austin SmithValerie ThomasMadame C. J. WalkerJane Cooke Wright, M.D.Roger Arliner Young, Ph.D.Chavonda J. Jacobs Young, Ph.D.

  • Lilegha
Awesome information. The other half of our equation in the arena of science and engineering UNTOLD TO THE MASSES. Still just the tip of the iceberg.
  • Deorro
great for children.
  • Marg
Thanks.
  • Xangeo
Good book. I like it.
  • Haal
I'm featured in this book, so for me...it's awesome! Great for the young, formative years of growth for any student.
  • RUsich155
This book is about African American women scientists and inventors, a rarity indeed.Reportedly African Americans in general comprise 4.5% of all science and engineering professionals today.So to read about the significant contributions of these pioneering women is both revealing and uplifting.Some of those profiled are somewhat well known;such as Madame C. J. Walker.She is known for her million dollar hair care business. Others are not so well known, such as Dr. Angela Furguson who joined with Dr. Ronald Scott in researching sickle cell anemia at Howard University.
Unfortunately the African American women scientists and inventors have been left out of mainstream history even as some African American men scientists have been included. Most of us are familiar with the contributions of George Washington Carver, who is credited with discovering 100 uses for the sweet potato and more than 300 uses for the common peanut in his lab at Tuskegee Institute. Also we are equally aware of Benjamin Banneker, who is widely hailed as inventing the first clock and assisting in the laying out of the design for the Nation's Capital, Washington, DC with Charles L'Enfant.
The author makes a laudable contribution for filling in existing historical omissions regarding African American women scientists. He brings to our attention warm inspiring stories along with factual historical information.
Teachers, other educators, parents and anyone else involved in the unending search to supplement traditional textbooks in order to ensure broader inclusion, will welcome this book. In doing so they too will expand their own knowledge and understanding of the subject. One does not need to be in the fields of science, engineering nor medicine to appreciate the message in African American Women Inventors. For the message transcends traditional borders or disciplines of study. The biographical descriptions of the featured women are of tremendous courage, high intellect and a lot of hard work. The stories in this book are exciting and geared to fostering a sense of empowerment to studenta and adults alike who read it. Students at all grade levels, genders and ethnic groups can readily relate to thses stories of personal triumph and achievement. However the author has written it to target ages 9 through 12 year olds.
  • Gindian
This is a wonderful book. Not only is it packed with interesting facts, but the interviews and writing style are so personal and intimate that one feels as if, for example, Mae Jemison is right in the room sharing her life story. The women are candid about the obstacles they met and overcame. I think a young adult of any race will find this book very inspiring...I know if it had been around when I was a kid, science and math would have been much more relevent to me!
Every inner city school library should buy this book. We need more books like this to inspire our youth. The author shines light on important achievements of African American Women. Hurrah! We need more books like this.