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Download The Queen's Slave Trader: John Hawkyns, Elizabeth I, and the Trafficking in Human Souls eBook

by Nick Hazlewood

Download The Queen's Slave Trader: John Hawkyns, Elizabeth I, and the Trafficking in Human Souls eBook
ISBN:
0060935693
Author:
Nick Hazlewood
Category:
Historical
Language:
English
Publisher:
Harper Perennial; Reprint edition (November 22, 2005)
Pages:
464 pages
EPUB book:
1826 kb
FB2 book:
1203 kb
DJVU:
1586 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
468


Sir John Hawkins: Queen Elizabeth’s Slave Trader. Very disturbing history of how the English entered into the slave trade

Sir John Hawkins: Queen Elizabeth’s Slave Trader. Hazlewood acknowledges Hawkyns' bravery, leadership ability, and even his occasional acts of compassion. But, as his deep involvement in the blossoming Atlantic slave trade shows, he was ruthless, intolerant, and chillingly indifferent to human suffering. Very disturbing history of how the English entered into the slave trade. Queen Elizabeth sanctioned the piracy of John Hawkyns in raids on the Portuguese and the Spanish, stealing their cargoes, which including human beings.

The Queen's Slave Trader book. In The Queen's Slave Trader, historian Nick Hazlewood examines one of the roots of slavery that until now has been overlooked. Throughout history, blame for the introduction of slavery. It was not just the money-hungry Dutch businessmen who traded lives for gold, forever changing the course of American and world history, but the Virgin Queen, praised for her love of music, art, and literature, who put hundreds of African men, women, and children onto American soil.

In The Queen's Slave Trader, historian Nick Hazlewood examines one of the roots of slavery that until now has been overlooked. His destination: West Africa. His mission: to capture humans.

Author: Hazlewood, Nick. Weight: . lbs. Product Group: Book. IsTextBook: No. Format: Paperback. Sir John Hawkins: Queen Elizabeth's Slave Trader by Kelsey, Harry Hardback Book. Sex Slaves : The Trafficking of Women in Asia by Brown, Louise. Sir John Hawkins : Queen Elizabeth's Slave Trader by Harry Kelsey (2003

Nick Hazlewood has written an engrossing book that gives us a rare and in-depth look into the opening salvos of the English slave trade through the voyages of Sir John Hawkyns (also spelled John Hawkins).

Nick Hazlewood has written an engrossing book that gives us a rare and in-depth look into the opening salvos of the English slave trade through the voyages of Sir John Hawkyns (also spelled John Hawkins), the first English trader.

The origins of the English slave trade - the result of which is often described as America's shame - can actually be traced back to a woman, England's Queen Elizabeth I. While Drake and Raleigh were close to the Queen, John Hawkyns and others like him were not and the queen never admitted to any relationship with him. Even some of her closest advisors were not aware of the extent to which these 'pirates' were funding the English Treasury. While her conduct was not particularly admirable, Elizabeth had inherited a kingdom badly in debt.

The queen's slave trader. John Hawkyns, Elizabeth I, and the trafficking in human souls. 1st ed. by Nick Hazlewood. Published 2004 by William Morrow in New York. Biography, History, Naval History, Relations with slave traders, Slave trade, Slave traders. Elizabeth I Queen of England (1533-1603), John Hawkins Sir (1532-1595).

The queen’s slave trader

The queen’s slave trader. Queen Elizabeth, dancing delicately on history’s high wire, offered private support (she had other disturbing dishes on her plate: Mary, Queen of Scots; the powerful Spanish), and Hawkyns found willing investors. The author describes in great detail his first two very profitable ventures and the disastrous third one, during which he barely escaped with his life when the Spanish attacked him in Mexico.

Written by. Nick Hazelwood. Manufacturer: HarperPerennial Release date: 1 December 2005 ISBN-10 : 0060935693 ISBN-13: 9780060935696. John Hawkyns, Elizabeth I, and the Trafficking in Human Souls (. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. The Queen's Slave Trader. Published November 22, 2005 by Harper Perennial.

Throughout history, blame for the introduction of slavery in America has been squarely placed upon the slave traders who ravaged African villages, the merchants who auctioned off human lives as if they were cattle, and the slave owners who ruthlessly beat their helpless victims. There is, however, above all these men, another person who has seemingly been able to avoid the blame due her. The origins of slavery -- often described as America's shame -- can actually be traced back to a woman, England's Queen Elizabeth I.

During the 1560s, Elizabeth was encouraging a Renaissance in her kingdom but also knew her country's economy could not finance her dreams for it. On direct orders from Her Majesty, John Hawkyns set sail from England. His destination: West Africa. His mission: to capture human lives.

After landing on the African coast, he used a series of brutal raids, violent beatings, and sheer terror to load his ships. As the first major slave trader, Hawkyns's actions and attitudes toward his cargo set the precedent for those who followed him for the next two hundred years. In The Queen's Slave Trader, historian Nick Hazlewood's haunting discoveries take you into the mind-set of the men who made their livelihoods trafficking human souls and at long last reveals the man who began it all -- and the woman behind him.

  • EROROHALO
I did not realize it was non-fiction but it is interesting and judging from the index historically correct.
  • Envias
A great story and so well written. Just the kind of book you can't put down. A truly great read.
  • Cheber
I was surprise to know that this kind of high level slave trade really happen in Great Britain. The book is an interesting read.
  • Akta
none
  • superstar
Interesting book. It was a very fast and easy read. Highly recommend this book if you are interested in history.
  • thrust
Attempts to analyze the historical sociology of capitalism and slavery too often deal in abstractions. And the morality of power politics, and economic globalization, as with Marx, tends to be sublimated into the account by value-free laws of history, etc,... All well and good, but. This account of a one vignette of the early gestation of the Atlantic slave trade, in England, speaks more eloquently by its plain account of actual people, at the moment of the crystallization of a dreadful circumstance. Significant is the detail of Queen Elizabeth, quoted early on as denouncing the traffic in human beings, succumbing to royal patronage once the immense profits possible became clear. While one can practically hear the ghost of Marx snorting with contempt, the plain fact of the matter is that there is an ethical history possible, and there was nothing inevitable in the way slavery, almost extinct in Europe, made a comeback in the early modern period. It is not utopian, as this portrait makes clear, to consider that politicians, instead of being untrustworthyfrom the word go, might actually not succumb to terrible temptations and enter in league with poor devils like the Hawkins portrayed here, basically a capitalist thug, soon a courtier. The portrait of John Hawkins gives a fine-grain series of images of one of the great and classic failures of economic globalization, and the terrible legacy and bitterness that it led to.
  • Tolrajas
Nick Hazlewood has written an engrossing book that gives us a rare and in-depth look into the opening salvos of the English slave trade through the voyages of Sir John Hawkyns (also spelled John Hawkins), the first English trader. Hazlewood supplies a brief biography of the Elizabethan mariner but focuses on Hawkyns' three major slave-trading voyages starting from 1562, from his departure from England to his actual acquisition of slaves in West Africa, through to his transactions in the New World and return to England.

This book is a must-have for those interested in the early Age of Exploration and the nature of early trans-Atlantic commerce, but it is of far greater significance and value for a general audience since it provides a rare glimpse into the little-known details of the wretched commerce in human beings that took place as the Americas were being settled. Treatments of the African slave trade often leave a reader wondering about the mindset and nature of the participants who were profiting from it, and Hazlewood provides us with a "you are there" feeling. He has clearly done his homework here, consulting primary literature in both English and Spanish archives to reconstruct the means by which Hawkyns acquired his slaves in West Africa, the "currency" exchanges which took place to seal the deal, the wretched and horrendous conditions on the slaving ships, and the nature of Hawkyns' eventual transactions in the Caribbean and Spanish outposts in America. What emerges is that Hawkyns was a remarkably shrewd and ruthless businessman, able to secure such an extraordinary profit margin from his deals that even Queen Elizabeth I-- initially opposed to the human commerce-- became a crucial investor in Hawkyns' slave-trading schemes, providing ships and resources for raising his crews and launching further voyages.

Hazlewood also casts Hawkyns' commerce within the broader context of 16th-century European seafaring, demonstrating how Hawkyns' actions-- viewed as smuggling by Spanish authorities-- in many ways constituted the root of the conflict that would flare between the Spaniards and English (leading to the Spanish Armada attack and a 16-year war between the two countries) later in the century. The reader is treated to an in-depth look at Hawkyns' fateful third voyage in 1567, in which his ships were attacked by a Spanish squadron off Veracruz. Hazlewood provides perhaps the best description in any recent book of the clash at Veracruz and its aftermath, both for Hawkins and his unfortunate crew members who were seized by the Spaniards. The book does drag somewhat in its later chapters but is not at all a chore to read, and Hazlewood's evocative style ensures that readers have a concrete tableau of the events that were transpiring, rather than merely an abstract depiction of them.

For what would become the United States as well as for Britain, the trans-Atlantic slave trade was integral to their history. Indeed, Americans are well aware of the brutal consequences of slavery from the Civil War in the 1860s, yet are often much less aware of the background to that "curious institution." Hazlewood details these often obscure origins with both accuracy and a highly readable presentation. The reader emerges from the book with a sense of the Hobbesian mentality and conditions that dominated seafaring in the 1500s, and a better sense of the psychology that enabled so many to allow themselves to partake in the bloody business of human enslavement and trans-Atlantic trafficking. Hawkyns is shown in all his complexity as a ruthless merchant and as an inspiring leader of his crews, who braved on-ship conditions and hostile oceans that would make most of us cringe barely minutes away from the dock. Hazlewood's book is an excellent complement to Harry Kelsey's book on John Hawkins-- which covers similar territory-- and to Hugh Thomas's general history of the slave trade. It's a must-have for historians, for teachers and school libraries (at many levels), and for those who want to learn about the often-obscure history of slavery and of the fascinating details of 16th-century Atlantic exploration and maritime commerce.