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Download Winston Churchill: The Flawed Genius of WWII eBook

by Christopher Catherwood

Download Winston Churchill: The Flawed Genius of WWII eBook
ISBN:
0425232441
Author:
Christopher Catherwood
Category:
Historical
Language:
English
Publisher:
Dutton Caliber; 1st edition (March 2, 2010)
Pages:
352 pages
EPUB book:
1290 kb
FB2 book:
1291 kb
DJVU:
1811 kb
Other formats
mobi lrf mbr docx
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
239


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Winston Churchill book.

For a Churchill fan like myself, Winston Churchill: The flawed Genius of WWII is like a bucket of cold water . Author has one very big idea. If Overlord had occurred in 1943, as it should have, the outcome of WWII would have favored the Allies

For a Churchill fan like myself, Winston Churchill: The flawed Genius of WWII is like a bucket of cold water; refreshing but uncomfortable. 5 people found this helpful. If Overlord had occurred in 1943, as it should have, the outcome of WWII would have favored the Allies. The reason it did not occur was the resistance of Churchill who was terrified of a disaster like the Battle of the Somme. Author is a hedgehog; Churchill was a fox. Churchill hada hundred ideas a day, and so his mentality is not well captured by the hedgehog-author.

He was a legendary man of strength-but no man is without his weaknesses

He was a legendary man of strength-but no man is without his weaknesses. Revered for his strength of character when Britain stood alone against Nazi Germany, Winston Churchill is painted as one of World War II's most heroic figures-a characterization that overshadows his faults, which have had their own devastating legacy.

Christopher Catherwood is the son of Sir Frederick Catherwood (former Vice-President of the . Winston Churchill: The Flawed Genius of World War II (Penguin, New York, 2009).

Christopher Catherwood is the son of Sir Frederick Catherwood (former Vice-President of the European Parliament), and maternal grandson of the preacher Dr. D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones. His Finest Hour: A Biography of Winston Churchill (Skyhorse Publishing, New York, 2010; published in the UK by Constable and Robinson, London as His Finest Hour: A Brief Life of Winston Churchill. The Evangelicals (Crossway Books, Wheaton IL, 2010).

However, in Christopher Catherwood’s Winston Churchill, very few of his virtues are in evidence. That Churchill was a flawed genius, however, has been well established in dozens if not hundreds of books. Catherwood opens his book by claiming that it is an unashamedly postrevisionist book that for the first time balances where Churchill was right as well as where he was wrong.

Christopher Catherwood talked about his book Winston Churchill: The Flawed Genius of World War II, published by Berkley Press. He examined Winston Churchill’s military decisions and policies between June 1940 and December 1941 that the author argues. He examined Winston Churchill’s military decisions and policies between June 1940 and December 1941 that the author argues were disadvantageous to the Allies efforts by extending the war and destabilizing several regions that have remained in chaos. He responded to questions from members of the audience. Christopher Catherwood is the author of several books, including Churchill’s Folly: How Winston Churchill Created Modern Iraq, published by Basic Books.

Pass me a cigar and a large glass of brandy I'm about to take you out prematurely, like your family I'm the Rhyme Minister, fresh in a hat and dinner jacket You look like a mix of EpicLLOYD and a Pringles packet! I was saving the planet from an axis of darkness While yo. .

Pass me a cigar and a large glass of brandy I'm about to take you out prematurely, like your family I'm the Rhyme Minister, fresh in a hat and dinner jacket You look like a mix of EpicLLOYD and a Pringles packet! I was saving the planet from an axis of darkness While you were back home, opening national parks, yes! You were born asthmatic, you're going to choke hard While I wake up every day and chain smoke cigars! I'll fight you on the beaches, I'll fight you on the beats, yes!

This book examines the decisions and policies of Churchill between June 1940 and December 1941 that actually hindered the Allied cause, extended the conflict, and even destabilized several regions that remain in chaos to this day. With profound insight into Churchill's early colonial experiences as well as his first tenure as First Lord of the Admiralty, Christopher Catherwood offers an honest appraisal of Churchill's strategies in a unique and fascinating perspective that separates the myth from the man.

Item Information:Author : Catherwood, Christopher. Product Information:TITLE: Winston Churchill: The Flawed Genius of WWII. We take pride in serving you. Length: 233. About Book2Basics Width: 160. Read full description. See details and exclusions. Winston Churchill: The Flawed Genius of WWII by Christopher Catherwood (Hardback). Pre-owned: lowest price.

An intimate, and sure to be controversial, look at the wartime triumphs and failures of Winston Churchill, this work examines the decisions and policies the Prime Minister made in the vital months between June 1940 and December 1941. 3 people like this topic

An intimate, and sure to be controversial, look at the wartime triumphs and failures of Winston Churchill, this work examines the decisions and policies the Prime Minister made in the vital months between June 1940 and December 1941. 3 people like this topic.

He was a legendary man of strength-but no man is without his weaknesses. Revered for his strength of character when Britain stood alone against Nazi Germany, Winston Churchill is painted as one of World War II's most heroic figures-a characterization that overshadows his faults, which have had their own devastating legacy. This book examines the decisions and policies of Churchill between June 1940 and December 1941 that actually hindered the Allied cause, extended the conflict, and even destabilized several regions that remain in chaos to this day. With profound insight into Churchill's early colonial experiences as well as his first tenure as First Lord of the Admiralty, Christopher Catherwood offers an honest appraisal of Churchill's strategies in a unique and fascinating perspective that separates the myth from the man.
  • Kare
Naive
  • GoodBuyMyFriends
This book is revisionist history at it best, or worst, depending on your view. I think it's very useful to try and understand Churchill's reluctance to take on the German army directly. The indirect approach explains the attempt to save Greece, the North African campaign, Sicily, and Italy in ways I'd never thought about before. It makes me wonder if Dieppe was designed to fail in order to support the other campaigns. It also made me think Churchill realized the British (and Commonwealth) army was, for various reasons, no longer the instrument of force it once was. It you add Dunkirk, Singapore, Dieppe, Tobruk, Caen, Arnhem and the Battle of the Scheldt together you don't get a very happy picture; one defeat or delay after another. For a Churchill fan like myself, Winston Churchill: The flawed Genius of WWII is like a bucket of cold water; refreshing but uncomfortable.
  • Kerahuginn
Catherwood's thesis may be summed up as follows: The D-Day landings would have been much easier to carry out if only everyone had had less time to prepare for them. It was due to Churchill that they did not.

David Emanuel's review provides the details of why this book is awful in so many ways. Suffice it for me to add that Catherwood never even attempts to provide the evidence that the planning, logistical and industrial support as well as the military operational readiness necessary for a successful invasion could have existed more than a year earlier than was the case. Don't waste your time.
  • Lcena
The points the book makes about Churchill's errors are reasonable, but the style of this book is terrible. Redundant, verbose and clumsy, this book could have been written in a much smoother way.
  • Rivik
Author has one very big idea. If Overlord had occurred in 1943, as it should have, the outcome of WWII would have favored the Allies. The reason it did not occur was the resistance of Churchill who was terrified of a disaster like the Battle of the Somme.

Author is a hedgehog; Churchill was a fox. Churchill hada hundred ideas a day, and so his mentality is not well captured by the hedgehog-author.

Enjoyed the book. Well argued, but I was notconvinced that Overlord could have occurred in 1943 ... and this is key.
  • Haracetys
Imagine, if you will, a new book about, say, the Titanic which purports to produce newly discovered "hard evidence" to prove the Captain's culpability based on the premise "had the iceberg not been there, there would not have been a collision and by striking that iceberg, therefore, it must have been the Captain's fault." Yes I know, it doesn't make any sense at all. It does, however, make about as much sense as this book.

Any biography, especially one about such a complex man as Churchill - soldier, journalist, hero, accomplished painter, orator, Nobel laureate, politician and leader of nations, should include that which is good, bad and even the ugly so that we may gauge exactly which qualities made him what he was. Dwelling on just the "good" would wrongly suggest he was an angel just as any concentration on the ugly would provide an equally false picture. In this work, however, we are taken beyond human characteristics and into the realms of fantasy as author Christopher Catherwood describes events which never actually occurred in order to expose his perception of Churchill's flawed character. Throughout his tirade of anti-British rhetoric, Catherwood's fundamental arguments are not based on actual facts and events but on `but if this had happened' then Churchill was wrong to have done whatever and `if that had happened' then Churchill should never have done as follows...

By introducing such confusing factors into what purports to be a serious biographical account, there is a very real danger of this fiction finding its way into factual history. In a shoddy, badly written and very dull work, the continual theme is as sound as American modern history being rewritten on the basis that, had President Kennedy not gone to Dallas on that fateful day, he would not have been shot. But he did and he was and any other scenario is, as I can only repeat, fictional.

Instead of exposing Churchill as less than perfect, however, Catherwood's unremitting diatribe only serves to reveal his own inadequacies as a historian who is now without credibility. This is the work of an insecure person who seeks the approval of others by slaying a Dragon and claiming the heroic status that goes which such an accomplishment. In order to do this, however, he must first convince the reader such a beast exists and there he fails quite miserably.

Devoid of objectivity and readable prose, all we have is the invention of doubtful, sometimes even ridiculous, principles from which the author seeks to develop his laborious and defective arguments. It is not Churchill who is shown to be flawed by this book, but the author. Most lamentable of all is his having lost sight of the most important consideration of any writer which is to hold the reader in the highest possible esteem. Without the reader, there is no point in writing anything from road signs to poetry or from books to shopping lists and by using fiction to create spurious arguments from which to extract alternative outcomes in history - outcomes that were never possible, Catherwood has taken his potential readership for complete fools.

No country or race has a monopoly on great people and nobody has ever suggested Churchill (or anyone else) was the greatest of all time - certainly not! Privately, we might all possess a bias towards our own countrymen, but that's just an extension of my dad's bigger than your dad and has no place here. I am confident that whatever Churchill did or did not do, will be judged on the basis of what actually occurred and what was known to him at the time and that this work will be consigned to the dustbin and the content not considered by any serious historian.

NM