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Download Journey from the Land of No: A Girlhood Caught in Revolutionary Iran eBook

by Roya Hakakian

Download Journey from the Land of No: A Girlhood Caught in Revolutionary Iran eBook
ISBN:
0609810308
Author:
Roya Hakakian
Category:
Historical
Language:
English
Publisher:
Broadway Books; 1st edition (June 28, 2005)
Pages:
256 pages
EPUB book:
1586 kb
FB2 book:
1691 kb
DJVU:
1286 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
611


Roya Hakakian is a tremendous writer and in the "Journey from the Land of No", Roya beautifully brings forth her personal experience growing up in Iran during the horrendous events of the revolution and its aftermath.

Roya Hakakian is a tremendous writer and in the "Journey from the Land of No", Roya beautifully brings forth her personal experience growing up in Iran during the horrendous events of the revolution and its aftermath. Roya is more than a writer, she is a poet. And in this work she exemplifies this and writes so beautifully and elegantly. I highly recommend this book for those wanting to understand the events that led to the revolution and the horrendous aftermath that resulted

A wonderfully evocative story, Journey from the Land of No reveals an Iran most readers have not encountered . Roya Hakakian is a producer for CBS' "60 Minutes". She is an Iranian Jew who emigrated from Iran with her family several years after the Ayatollah Khomeini came into power.

A wonderfully evocative story, Journey from the Land of No reveals an Iran most readers have not encountered and marks the debut of a stunning new talent. This book is a memoir of her growing up years from about age 9 to age 18 in Tehran. Hakakian does an amazing job of writing a coming-of-age story layered with the story of the Islamic Revolution in Iran. With intense detail, she describes the restrictions placed on her as a woman and as a Jew.

Journey from the Land of No: A Girlhood Caught in Revolutionary Iran (Crown) was a Barnes .

Journey from the Land of No: A Girlhood Caught in Revolutionary Iran (Crown) was a Barnes & Noble's Pick of the Week, Ms. magazine Must Read of the Summer, Publishers Weekly’s Best Book of the Year, and an Elle magazine's Best Nonfiction Book of 2004. It also won the Persian Heritage Foundation's 2006 Latifeh Yarshater Book Award, and is. the 2005 winner of the Best Memoir by the Connecticut Center for the Book.

Электронная книга "Journey from the Land of No: A Girlhood Caught in Revolutionary Iran", Roya Hakakian. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Journey from the Land of No: A Girlhood Caught in Revolutionary Iran" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

In "Journey from the Land of No: A Girlhood Caught in Revolutionary Iran," Author Roya Hakakian recalls her childhood and adolescence in prerevolutionary Iran as she was twelve years old in 1979 when the revolution swept through Tehran. Among other things, Hakakian relates what life was like for women after the country fell into the hands of Islamic fundamentalists. This discussion with the author aired on a 2004 episode of "Conversations On The Coast with Jim Foster" originating from San Francisco, California.

A wonderfully evocative story, Journey from the Land of No reveals an Iran most readers have not encountered and marks the . ROYA HAKAKIAN is a former associate producer at CBS’s 60 Minutes and a documentary filmmaker

A wonderfully evocative story, Journey from the Land of No reveals an Iran most readers have not encountered and marks the debut of a stunning new talent. Пользовательский отзыв - kikilon - LibraryThing. ROYA HAKAKIAN is a former associate producer at CBS’s 60 Minutes and a documentary filmmaker. She is the author of two acclaimed volumes of poetry in Persian and a recipient of the 2002–2003 Dewitt Wallace–Reader’s Digest Fellowship. She lives in Connecticut. Visit her at ww. oyaHakakian. Библиографические данные.

Journalist Roya Hakakian's beautifully written memoir of growing up in pre- and post-revolutionary Iran makes a. .Roya Hakakian has written the most beautiful memoir I have ever read.

Roya Hakakian has written the most beautiful memoir I have ever read. Only a poet could tell her life story - and the upheavals of the Iranian culture around her - with such perfect rhythm and nuance. A major book by an important writer.

Broadway Books, 2005. Hakakian was twelve years old in 1979 when the revolution swept through Tehran. The daughter of an esteemed poet, she grew up in a household that hummed with intellectual life. Family gatherings were punctuated by witty, satirical exchanges and spontaneous recitations of poetry. But the Hakakians were also part of the very small Jewish population in Iran who witnessed the iron fist of the Islamic fundamentalists increasingly tightening its grip. A wonderfully evocative story, Journey from the Land of No reveals an Iran most readers have not encountered and marks the debut of a stunning new talent.

Books are on reserve in the library

Books are on reserve in the library. A copy of this syllabus and other course materials can be found at: Important Dates April 24: Guest Speaker Iranian Actress Gohar Kheirandish May 8: Midterm Exam June 11: Final Exam. 2 Class Schedule Week I: (April 3-5) April 3: Chapter 1 of Sexual Politics in Modern Iran April 5: Chapter 2 of Sexual Politics in Modern Iran Week II (April 10-12) Crowning Anguish, pp. 107-182, 194-214 and 236-262 April 12: Discussion of Group Presentations Week III (April 17-19) Sexual Politics, Chapters 6, 7 Week IV (April.

Автор: Hakakian, Roya Название: Journey from the Land of No Издательство: Random House .

From the Hardcover“We stormed every classroom, inscribed our slogans on the blackboard . . . Never had mayhem brought more peace. All our lives we had been taught the virtues of behaving, and now we were discovering the importance of misbehaving. Too much fear had tainted our days. Too many afternoons had passed in silence, listening to a fanatic’s diatribes. We were rebelling because we were not evil, we had not sinned, and we knew nothing of the apocalypse. . . . This was 1979, the year that showed us we could make our own destinies. We were rebelling because rebelling was all we could do to quell the rage in our teenage veins. Together as girls we found the courage we had been told was not in us.”In Journey from the Land of No Roya Hakakian recalls her childhood and adolescence in prerevolutionary Iran with candor and verve. The result is a beautifully written coming-of-age story about one deeply intelligent and perceptive girl’s attempt to ï¬?nd an authentic voice of her own at a time of cultural closing and repression. Remarkably, she manages to re-create a time and place dominated by religious fanaticism, violence, and fear with an open heart and often with great humor.Hakakian was twelve years old in 1979 when the revolution swept through Tehran. The daughter of an esteemed poet, she grew up in a household that hummed with intellectual life. Family gatherings were punctuated by witty, satirical exchanges and spontaneous recitations of poetry. But the Hakakians were also part of the very small Jewish population in Iran who witnessed the iron fist of the Islamic fundamentalists increasingly tightening its grip. It is with the innocent confusion of youth that Roya describes her discovery of a swastika—“a plus sign gone awry, a dark reptile with four hungry claws”—painted on the wall near her home. As a schoolgirl she watched as friends accused of reading blasphemous books were escorted from class by Islamic Society guards, never to return. Only much later did Roya learn that she was spared a similar fate because her teacher admired her writing.Hakakian relates in the most poignant, and at times painful, ways what life was like for women after the country fell into the hands of Islamic fundamentalists who had declared an insidious war against them, but we see it all through the eyes of a strong, youthful optimist who somehow came up in the world believing that she was different, knowing she was special. At her loneliest, Roya discovers the consolations of writing while sitting on the rooftop of her house late at night. There, “pen in hand, I led my own chorus of words, with a melody of my own making.” And she discovers the craft that would ultimately enable her to find her own voice and become her own person.A wonderfully evocative story, Journey from the Land of No reveals an Iran most readers have not encountered and marks the debut of a stunning new talent.
  • Acebiolane
Every American should educate themselves about the country of Iran, which was Persia, and the history of the U.S. and that country. This story is the autobiographical account of a young girl, born into the idyllic place Iran was at that time (beautiful, peaceful, later tensions then unheard of) and coming of age at the end of the Shah's reign and the in-between years before hard-line Islamists turned Iran into the hell it is today. Anything was possible and they believed freedom would be theirs at last: little did they know. A beautiful, harrowing read ...
  • Drelalak
Roya was a girl in a changing country. Being a part of a Jewish family made things much harder for her. It was enjoyable and informative to read about how her family lived in the earlier days and heartbreaking to see how the oppression changed their lives. Since it was written from the viewpoint of a young girl, political and social things were not always clear to me.
  • Leyl
I just finished reading Roya Hakakian’s memoir of coming of age in the Iranian revolution.
The pace of the writing intensifies with Ms. Hakakian’s description of the revolutionary times she and her family and friends lived through.
I had next to no detailed knowledge of the Iranian revolution and this memoir is beautifully written.
I was also fascinated as a Jew with her first hand descriptions of her Jewish family living through a Muslim fundamentalist transformation, and her descriptions of living as a minority in times of transformative change. - Ilan Israel
  • Xig
The beginning of the story leads skillfully from the author's memories of an untroubled childhood that gradually faded and became a troubled time during her teenaged years when the Iranian revolt took place and the ayatollah took over. The descriptions are vivid and troubling that this took place after Hitler's time. It is troubling and difficult to understand that once again the world stood and watched events that mirrored Hitler's persecutions and nothing was done to stop the ayatollah and his followers.
  • OCARO
Roya Hakakian is a tremendous writer and in the "Journey from the Land of No", Roya beautifully brings forth her personal experience growing up in Iran during the horrendous events of the revolution and its aftermath. Roya is more than a writer, she is a poet. And in this work she exemplifies this and writes so beautifully and elegantly. I highly recommend this book for those wanting to understand the events that led to the revolution and the horrendous aftermath that resulted. Roya beautifully guides the reader through her elegant prose and masterpiece to the events themselves so that the reader feels that they were actually a part of the scene. Highly recommended!
  • Lcena
I knew very little about the largeJewish presence in Iran before the 1978 revolution. My sadness for these people grew with each turn of the page, but I am glad to know the truth. Some parts are hard to read because the fanatics were given free reign and so many innocents suffered.
  • Kahavor
This book is a treasure for those interested in enhancing their understanding of religious minorities' "Nationalist" mindset in Iran, particularly during the Pahlavi period. One has to take into cosideration that a large number of Jews in Iran converted to Islam for pragmatic reasons prior to the Pahlavi dynasty. The brand of pre-Islamic nationanist secularism promoted by the Pahlavi shahs in Iran is ever present throughout this book. The author does, to some degree, have an understanding of an "Iranian consciousness" regardless of religious inclination. She is very sympathetic toward "martyrs" of Iran-Iraq war, to the extend to which she modestly discredits herself as a moral authority on the subject due to the fact that she did not pay a physical price for defending Iran. Many Iranian Jews consider themselves Iranians first and then perhaps Jewish, quite similar to many secular Muslim Iranians.
This book opened my eyes like nothing I've read since "Midnight's Children." And it is all the more powerful for being a woman's story. Do we have many books like this? I don't think so. It's the story of the convergence of the peak, rapid-fire events of the writer's dawning adolescence with the historically definitive crises of her country of Iran, her city of Tehran. I agree with Salman Rushdie that the health of a culture can be measured by its treatment of women. JOURNEY follows a trail of blood--the blood of the lamb slaughtered for a wedding feast, the blood of a disgraced female cousin's questioned virginity, and finally the blood of the martrys of the revolution. And then there is the writer's own blood--her first menstrual blood at 13. On the threshold of womanhood, she wonders at the shame assigned to women, the glory to the martyr's sacrifice: "No matter how young or old, that bleeding head was venerated. And not my blood?"

A wonderful thing in this book is the chapter about the character of Mrs. Arman. The female schoolteacher, mother and muse of women writers. (Like a Eudora Welty schoolteacher heroine.) She gives her students a sense of solidarity in their exile under the Muslim regime; her touch restores them to their bodies. And it's the moment when Mrs. Arman proclaims--you're a writer! you're a writer! Don't ever forget it! Don't let me down!--that is the decisive one in the author's story, that baptizes her and sanctifies her coming journey out into the world.

Because the story's about her emergence as a writer as well. It's only when the map of her beloved city (which her writing traces) is no longer recognizable and the notebooks she's filled with her poetry have been burnt, that her journey from the land of No is inescapable.

The writing is breaktaking. The metaphors flow effortlessly. I think this is a major book by an important writer.