almediah.fr
» » Some Memories of a Long Life, 1854-1911

Download Some Memories of a Long Life, 1854-1911 eBook

by Ruth Bader Ginsburg,Linda Przybyszewski,Malvina Shanklin Harlan

Download Some Memories of a Long Life, 1854-1911 eBook
ISBN:
0679642625
Author:
Ruth Bader Ginsburg,Linda Przybyszewski,Malvina Shanklin Harlan
Category:
Historical
Language:
English
Publisher:
Modern Library; 2002 Modern Library ed edition (May 7, 2002)
Pages:
320 pages
EPUB book:
1797 kb
FB2 book:
1533 kb
DJVU:
1604 kb
Other formats
lrf docx azw txt
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
610


Harlan, Malvina Shanklin. Some Memories of a Long Life, 1854-1911. New York: Mondern Day Library, 2001. This volume was unearthed by Ruth Bader Ginsberg in the Library of Congress amoung the papers concerning the life of Chief Justice Harlan

Harlan, Malvina Shanklin. This volume was unearthed by Ruth Bader Ginsberg in the Library of Congress amoung the papers concerning the life of Chief Justice Harlan. In this book Mrs. Harlan discusses the time that she lived with her husband. They married and took up house, initially with his family, in 1854 and she and her husband lived together until his death in 1911. There are some exceptions where she referenced early diary.

After Justice Harlan’s death in 1911, Malvina wrote Some Memories of a Long Life, 1854–1911, as a testament to her husband’s accomplishments and to her own. The memoir begins with Malvina, the daughter of passionate abolitionists, becoming the teenage bride of John Marshall. The memoir begins with Malvina, the daughter of passionate abolitionists, becoming the teenage bride of John Marshall Harlan, whose family owned more than a dozen slaves.

Some Memories of a Long Life, 1854–1911 (completed 1915, published 2001) The range of dates that Shanklin Harlan used in the title of her memoir (1854–1911) was the period of her time with John Marshall Harlan – from when she met him when she was 16 until his death in 1911.

After Justice Harlan’s death in 1911, Malvina wrote Some Memories of a Long Life, 1854–1911, as a testament .

After Justice Harlan’s death in 1911, Malvina wrote Some Memories of a Long Life, 1854–1911, as a testament to her .

Like Abigail Adams, Malvina Shanklin Harlan witnessed-and gently .

Like Abigail Adams, Malvina Shanklin Harlan witnessed-and gently influenced-national history from the unique perspective of a political leader’s wife.

where disenchantment might so easily have followed, I can say that for me it did. Excerpted from Some Memories of a Long Life, 1854-1911 by Malvina Shanklin Harlan - Foreword by Ruth Bader Ginsburg; Afterword by Linda Przybyszewski. Excerpted by permission.

Shanklin Harlan, Malvina (July 8, 2003). Some Memories of a Long Life, 1854–1911. Retrieved 2017-06-22.

It was then published by Random House with a foreword by Ruth Bader Ginsburg, annotations and an afterword by Linda Przybyszewski, and an epilogue on the Harlan legacy by Amelia Newcomb, a descendant of the Harlans and writer for the The Christian Science Monitor. Shanklin Harlan, Malvina (July 8, 2003).

Harlan, John Marshall, 1833-1911. Harlan, Malvina Shanklin, 1838-1916. Judges' spouses - United States - Biography. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on March 16, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Like Abigail Adams, Malvina Shanklin Harlan witnessed-and gently influenced-national history from the . The wife of Supreme Court justice John Marshall Harlan describes such seminal events as the Civil War, the end of slavery, and various Supreme Court decisions influenced by her own everyday life and that of her family.

Like Abigail Adams, Malvina Shanklin Harlan witnessed—and gently influenced—national history from the unique perspective of a political leader’s wife. Her husband, Supreme Court Justice John Marshall Harlan (1833–1911), played a central role in some of the most significant civil rights decisions of his era, including his lone dissenting opinion in Plessy v. Ferguson, the infamous case that endorsed separate but equal segregation. And for fifty-seven years he was married to a woman who was busy making a mental record of their eventful lives.After Justice Harlan’s death in 1911, Malvina wrote Some Memories of a Long Life, 1854–1911, as a testament to her husband’s accomplishments and to her own. The memoir begins with Malvina, the daughter of passionate abolitionists, becoming the teenage bride of John Marshall Harlan, whose family owned more than a dozen slaves. Malvina depicts her life in antebellum Kentucky, and her courageous defense of the Harlan homestead during the Civil War. She writes of her husband’s ascent in legal circles and his eventual appointment to the Supreme Court in 1877, where he was the author of opinions that continued to influence American race relations deep into the twentieth century. Yet Some Memories is more than a wife’s account of a famous and powerful man. It chronicles the remarkable evolution of a young woman from Indiana who became a keen observer of both her family’s life and that of her nation.When Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg began researching the history of the women associated with the Supreme Court, the Library of Congress sent her Malvina Harlan’s unpublished manuscript. Recalling Abigail Adams’s order to “remember the ladies,” Justice Ginsburg has guided its long journey from forgotten document to published book. Some Memories of a Long Life includes a Foreword by Justice Ginsburg, as well as an Afterword by historian Linda Przybyszewski and an Epilogue of the Harlan legacy by Amelia Newcomb. According to Library Journal, “This is the sort of book you call a publishing event.”
  • Cala
Very informational
  • Ximathewi
good story!
  • Umrdana
Harlan, Malvina Shanklin. Some Memories of a Long Life, 1854-1911. New York: Mondern Day Library, 2001.

This volume was unearthed by Ruth Bader Ginsberg in the Library of Congress amoung the papers concerning the life of Chief Justice Harlan. In this book Mrs. Harlan discusses the time that she lived with her husband. They married and took up house, initially with his family, in 1854 and she and her husband lived together until his death in 1911. She wrote this account of their life after the fact- looking back on their time together. There are some exceptions where she referenced early diary entries, letters and various reports made on events that affected them.
To me this was a lovely book that gave an interesting account of the day to day life of the wife of a Supreme Court Justice. She addresses many things that you would simply have no way of knowing about the time period. She does not get very personal in her account, but I think that is true to form for the time period. You hear nothing of her children when they are young except to point out when they were present for certain events. Some of the details of daily life I assume were too intimate to discuss.
She offers an interesting perspective of courtship for a woman of her time and also an interesting perspective of the expansion of women's rights. She views herself as an old fashined woman with little ability of her own when honors are bestowed upon her. For instance in 1908 she was invited to represent Kentucky, her husband's home state, for the International Child's Welfare Convention. She accepts the appointment and replys this way:
Ye'd scarce accept on of my age
to speak in public on the stage;
But while I think ye'd better wait
And make a "New Woman" your diligate,
I'll try to be there, my Governor dear,--
Though for Kentucky t'will not seem quite clear
She'll be ripresented at all to her mind,
The choice of your old friend is considered kind;
And she'll do her best (of that ye'll be sure)
And signs herself, "Yours till death."

Mrs. Harlan lead an interesting life. In her time she witnessed the Civil War and the beginnings of World War I. She was an intimate witness to many historic cases heard by the Supreme Court. Mrs. Harlan had an extremly interesting perspective because of her husband's public life. This was a very interesting book to read; it offers a window through which to peer at this long life of Mrs. Malvina Shanklin Harlan, a very interesting woman indeed.
  • Doath
There are only a few pages worth reading in this volume, and the editor who passed it up the first time ( around 1914) knew his business. She is at her most interesting when describing some of the minutae and customs of 19th century life. When she starts descibing people, places and events, she falls flat. Very superficial, very stereotyped.