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Download Patton At Bay: The Lorraine Campaign, 1944 eBook

by Carlo D'Este,John Nelson Rickard

Download Patton At Bay: The Lorraine Campaign, 1944 eBook
ISBN:
1574887823
Author:
Carlo D'Este,John Nelson Rickard
Category:
Historical
Language:
English
Publisher:
Potomac Books; First Edition edition (June 1, 2004)
Pages:
336 pages
EPUB book:
1754 kb
FB2 book:
1962 kb
DJVU:
1622 kb
Other formats
mbr txt rtf mobi
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
868


John N. Rickard's "Patton At Bay: Lorraine Campaign, September to December, 1944" is certainly an academic tour-de-force examination of the Lorraine Campaign and the role of US Third Army.

John N. Readers should not expect descriptions of small-unit actions but rather Corps (sometimes Division) level action, as well as analysis of decisions made by Patton and his subordinate commanders that dictated the pace and 'style' of combat in the Lorraine region in the fall of 1944.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Patton At Bay: The Lorraine Campaign, 1944 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

In Advance and Destroy, Captain John Nelson Rickard explores the commander's operational performance during the entire Ardennes campaign, through . He is the author of Patton at Bay: The Lorraine Campaign, 1944.

In Advance and Destroy, Captain John Nelson Rickard explores the commander's operational performance during the entire Ardennes campaign, through his "estimate of the situation," the . Army's doctrinal approach to problem-solving.

In other words, Lorraine found Patton completely out of his element. The answer, according to John Nelson Rickard’s Patton at Bay: not very well

In other words, Lorraine found Patton completely out of his element. If flexibility is an attribute of all great generals, then Metz was an interesting test case for Patton. How does a general built for speed, a master-motivator and prodigious ass-kicker, behave when things slow down? The answer, according to John Nelson Rickard’s Patton at Bay: not very well. Getting stuck in front of the Moselle River was not Patton’s fault. He ran out of gas, a result of General Dwight D. Eisenhower’s decision in the tricky area of fuel allocation. What happened after that, however, was a different story.

Patton At Bay: The Lorraine Campaign, 1944 by Rickard, John Nelson and a great selection of related books, art . Foreward by Carlo D'Este. Patton's generalship and the fortunes of war disarm Patton and put a tarnish on his historical legacy according to the author.

Foreward by Carlo D'Este. USPS Tracking provided.

Plagued by supply shortages, critical interference from superiors, flooded rivers, fortified cities, and the highly determined German army, Patton had little opportunity to wage the type of fast armored campaign of which he was so enamored.

the Generals; John Nelson Rickard, Patton at Bay: The Lorraine Campaign, 1944; Derek S. Zumbro, Battle for the Ruhr; John Toland, The Last Hundred Days; David Kahn, The Codebreakers; Eric Larrabee, Commander in Chief; S. M. Plokhy, Yalta: The Price of Peace; and Diane Shaver. Plokhy, Yalta: The Price of Peace; and Diane Shaver Clemens, Yalta. Fine books on the home front during the final year of the war include David M. Kennedy, Freedom From Fear; Doris Kearns Goodwin, No Ordinary Time, and David Reynolds, Rich Relations.

1988), and C. D'Este (1995); studies by H. Essame (1974), Z. Favago (1986), M. . Blumenson (1985), and J. W. Jordan (2011). George S. Patton: Selected full-text books and articles. Advance and Destroy: Patton as Commander in the Bulge By John Nelson Rickard University Press of Kentucky, 2011. The Fighting Pattons By Brian M. Sobel Praeger Publishers, 1997. The Lorraine Campaign By H. Cole Historical Division Department of the Army, 1950. Librarian's tip: Includes discussion of George S. Patton in multiple chapters.

the Lorraine campaign, 1944. 1st ed. by John Nelson Rickard. Published 2004 by Brassey's in Washington, . Biography, Campaigns, Generals, History, History, Military, Lorraine (France), Military History, United States, United States. Army, 3rd, World War, 1939-1945. Includes bibliographical references (p. -277) and index. Originally published: Westport, Conn.

For Lt. Gen. George S. Patton, Jr., the battle for Lorraine during the fall and winter of 1944 was a frustrating and grueling experience of static warfare. Plagued by supply shortages, critical interference from superiors, flooded rivers, fortified cities, and the highly determined German army, Patton had little opportunity to wage the type of fast armored campaign of which he was so enamored. Author John Rickard examines Patton’s generalship during these bitter battles and suggests that Patton was unable to adapt to the new realities of the campaign, thereby failing to wage the most effective warfare possible. Relying on a broad range of historical sources, including personal papers and division after-action reports, this treatment of Patton’s operational performance in Lorraine goes beyond the official history. It describes Patton’s philosophy of war and explains why it failed him in Lorraine. Supplemented by full orders of battle, casualty and equipment loses, and excellent maps based on Hugh M. Cole’s official U.S. Army history of the campaign, Patton at Bay,/i> is a penetrating study of one of America’s best fighting generals.
  • Qusicam
Very well-written book on the subject. I had previously read the official US Army report on the Loraine campaign by Hugh M. Cole, and this is an excellent companion piece because it comes many years later with different sources and also comments on the official history. After reading the official history it was great to read a non-official reading of the campaign. The maps were very good, based on the official report. A must-read for this little known aspect of the WWII.
  • Brightcaster
There's a standard narrative of Patton's WWII "exploits," perhaps mainly formed by the George C. Scott movie: North Africa, Sicily, slapping incident, FUSAG deception, Normandy breakout, Bulge. In the movie, the only real mentions of the Lorraine campaign are its beginning and end: Ike's decision to take Patton's gasoline away, which magnified the logistics problem that was already bringing the chase across France to a halt, and the December plan to cross the Westwall, which was cancelled by the need to shift north to relieve the forces in the Ardennes.

While it wasn't glamorous, Lorraine was an important campaign that deserves more attention. This book gives it that attention, and it's a good effort.

Basically, the Allies were trapped only a few miles from the Normandy beaches for nearly two months until Patton's 3rd army led the breakout. After the American, Canadian, and Polish forces cut off the German forces in the "Falaise pocket," the remaining German forces abandoned most of their equipment and made a disorderly retreat all the way across France, chased by Patton's army.

By the end of August, a number of things happened that changed the character of the campaign. Patton's army was now at the end of a 400-mile supply line, and the thin flow of supplies was almost completely cut off for a critical week while priority was given to Montgomery for the infamous "Market Garden." The Germans made good use of this delay by beefing up their defenses. These were generally inferior troops and under-strength units, but they were stronger than they had been and now they were on the border of their "Fatherland" and ready to fight.

These problems were compounded by two other factors. First, Patton's intelligence declined as the Germans increasingly relied on telephones and the flow of "Ultra" information fell off and as the growing number of German sympathizers in the area cut off the flow of local intelligence. Patton's military power was also less than it had been during the glorious days of August because of reduced air support and transfers of nearly half his divisions to other units.

The Lorraine campaign was dominated by the fortified city of Metz, the crossings of the Moselle, Seille, and other rivers, and fights over a series of hills east of the Moselle. The weather during the campaign was atrocious, which made the rivers even more difficult to cross and slowed the going on land as well. The book gives an excellent account of the basics of the campaign as well as an analysis of Patton's strategy, tactics, and leadership. It is critical of all three, arguing that Patton a) failed to recognize that his armor-led pursuit tactics no longer were effective, b) failed to supervise his somewhat slow-moving corps and division commanders, c) got bogged down in questionable and poorly planned attacks on the heavily fortified city of Metz, and, perhaps most critically, d) spread his forces out widely in an "attack on all fronts" plan that his army wasn't strong enough to execute. The result was a 2-month-long slugfest at and east of the Moselle crossings. Then, just as they were about to launch into the Westwall, the German attack in the Ardennes changed everything and created opportunities for even greater glory for Patton and 3rd Army.

It's an excellent summary of a campaign that deserves more attention.
  • Der Bat
My dad was in the 95th Infantry Division. And fought in the Lorraine Camp,. I had a few pictures of my dad in Europe. He told me a little about the Battle for Metz. Really great book. THANKS
  • Мох
If our generals of WW2 had been under the spotlight of today many of our "great heads would roll". This book unravels some of the misleading "successes" we were feed by the journalists of that era.
See also "An Army At Dawn" to read about more of our human costs to glorify men's egos.
  • Ionzar
John N. Rickard's "Patton At Bay: Lorraine Campaign, September to December, 1944" is certainly an academic tour-de-force examination of the Lorraine Campaign and the role of US Third Army. Readers should not expect descriptions of small-unit actions but rather Corps (sometimes Division) level action, as well as analysis of decisions made by Patton and his subordinate commanders that dictated the pace and 'style' of combat in the Lorraine region in the fall of 1944. In particular "Patton At Bay" mainly covers the period from Sept to early Dec as the Third Army's mobile armored drive of Aug shifted to several, often disjoined, ground to a largely attritional and mostly static push against defensive positions to which the Germans fell back during their rout from France. Rickard not only provides the reader with a considerable amount of historical detail but also attempts to inject perspective and unbiased analysis.

At least one reviewer has criticized "Patton At Bay" as being 'overly academic' and 'lacking in true understanding of military tactics and strategy' - this reviewer certainly cannot argue against "Patton At Bay" being a serious piece of academic historiography, but it is a bit strong to flatly state that Rickard misses the boat on the real outcome of Patton's leadership in the Lorraine Campaign. In fact Rickard is up front in saying that despite problems that arose, as Rickard concludes, largely from Patton's over optimism, underestimation of German resilience, and decision to set siege to Metz and associated 'forts', the campaign was largely successful in that the Germans lost proportionately larger numbers of men, machines and equipment and were ultimately forced all the way to the West Wall (Siegfried Line). What Rickard does is criticize the venerated Patton and Third Army as not being faultless - this upsets some. It is in fact the duty of the historian to provide a fair and balanced judgment and assessment of events and decisions, and in this Rickard fully succeeds.

"Patton At Bay" is a solid piece of historical literature that is recommended highly for those who want a more "academic" less "visceral and parochial" view of the US Third Army in NW Europe during one of its less press-popular periods of action. 4 solid stars.
  • anneli
This is one of the only books I've ever read that critique General Patton. This book, to me the layman seems extremely well researched, and worthy of academic exaltations. The author is brave to look at the Lorraine Campaign with such a critical eye, not always welcome on American icons of war.