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by Lucia Graves

Download A Woman Unknown: Voices from a Spanish Life eBook
ISBN:
1582430977
Author:
Lucia Graves
Category:
Historical
Language:
English
Publisher:
Counterpoint (September 20, 2000)
Pages:
288 pages
EPUB book:
1399 kb
FB2 book:
1606 kb
DJVU:
1765 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
475


Lucia Graves, daughter of the poet Robert Graves and his wife Beryl, grew up in the beautiful village of Deia on the island of. .

Lucia Graves, daughter of the poet Robert Graves and his wife Beryl, grew up in the beautiful village of Deia on the island of Majorca. Neither Spanish nor Catholic by birth, she nevertheless absorbed the different traditions of Spain and felt th An extraordinary, perceptive memoir of Spain and Mallorca by the daughter of the classic English poet, Robert Graves. Lucia Graves, daughter of the poet Robert Graves and his wife Beryl, grew up in the beautiful village of Deia on the island of Majorca. Her first book, A Woman Unknown: Voices from a Spanish life, was published in 1999, in the UK. It has been translated into Spanish, Catalan, Dutch and French and ha also appeared in the USA.

Graves tells us about Olga, her childhood ballet instructor-a woman who .

Graves tells us about Olga, her childhood ballet instructor-a woman who had once achieved prima ballerina status in a major Russian ballet company, but eventually had to settle for a life of ballet instruction in a small Majorcan village. There's the story of Sister Valentina, one of the Catholic nuns who was Graves' teacher and mentor. In the early 1990s, Graves became the "Woman Unknown" of the book's title when she and her husband of 26 years agreed to end their marriage. The subtitle, "Voices from a Spanish Life," aptly describe the many stories the author relates about vital Spanish women-unknown women whose lives she honors and memorializes.

7 Voices from a Spanish Life Blanca Blanca Señorita Mercedes Señorita Mercedes Señorita Mercedes . Mercedes, Sister Valentina, Olga, Jimena, Conchita) Alternation between Graves’ story and those of others (Blanca, Srta.

7 Voices from a Spanish Life Blanca Blanca Señorita Mercedes Señorita Mercedes Señorita Mercedes Señorita Mercedes Olga Olga Francisca Francisca Jimena Jimena Sister Valentina Sister Valentina Conchita Conchita.

A Woman Unknown: Voices from a Spanish Life (Paperback). This is a book of high literary distinction and extraordinary humanity. Lucia Graves (author).

Neither Spanish nor Catholic by birth, she nevertheless absorbed the different traditions of Spain and felt the full impact of Franco's dictatorship through the experience of her education. Lucia found herself continually bridging the gaps between Catalan, Spanish and English, as she picked up the patterns and nuances that contain the essence of each culture.

Lucia Graves is a British writer and translator. A Woman Unknown: Voices from a Spanish Life )

Lucia Graves is a British writer and translator. Graves is known for her work in The Columbus Papers, where she served as a translator of Christopher Columbus’s controversial Barcelona letter of 1493 into English. A Woman Unknown: Voices from a Spanish Life ) Lucia Graves, daughter of the poet Robert Graves, was raised by her parents on the island of Majorca, in postwar Spain.

Woman Unknown: Voices From A Spanish Life' by Lucia Graves is published by Virago at pounds 1. 9. Every time I rendered one of my father's books into Spanish or Catalan, I could hear his voice as if he were talking to me over my shoulder, even in those last years, when he had stopped speaking and lived in a world of bewildering silence, having lost his grip on reality.

Authors: Lucia Graves. Publisher: Virago Press Ltd. A Woman Unknown: Voices from a Spanish Life. Title: A Woman Unknown: Voices from a Spanish Life. Condition: Used; Good. Read full description. See details and exclusions. See all 4 pre-owned listings.

Lucia is a translator working in English and Spanish/Catalan. She has also published a novel, The Memory House, and a memoir entitled A Woman Unknown.

Lucia Graves (born 21 July 1943) is a writer and translator. Lucia is a translator working in English and Spanish/Catalan. Her translations include the worldwide bestsellers The Shadow of the Wind, The Angel's Game, The Prisoner of Heaven, and "The Labyrinth of the Spirits", by Carlos Ruiz Zafón, and The Columbus Papers She has also published a novel, The Memory House, and a memoir entitled A Woman Unknown. These were both originally written in English, but Graves herself did the translations into Spanish.

View on timesmachine. Voices From a Spanish Life

View on timesmachine. Voices From a Spanish Life. 273 pp. Washington: Counterpoint. His daughter, Lucia Graves, a product of the poet's.

Lucia Graves, daughter of the poet Robert Graves, was raised by her parents on the island of Majorca, in postwar Spain. At home she spoke English and absorbed the family's thoroughly British culture; in her mountain village she spoke the local variant of Catalan and was steeped in the island's Mediterranean folkways; and in convent school she received a rigid Franco-era Spanish education, a mix of Catholicism and fascist ideology. Her beautifully nuanced memoir, already published in England to great acclaim, is a profound meditation on how these three cultures and languages-English, Catalan, and Spanish-have shaped her life and thought. It is also a many-voiced portrait of Spain under Franco, tracing the patterns of love, sacrifice, and female forbearance that mark not only her own life but those of other Spanish women she has known. Her individual portraits are masterly-"through them," said the Daily Telegraph, "matters barely mentioned in most histories of the Franco years become appallingly real"-and her ability to articulate the essence of Spain has won her deserved comparison to Orwell and V.S. Pritchett.
  • Lilegha
This memoir is a knock-out. It brought to mind my own first visit to Spain's Costa Brava in the summer of 1959 at age 14: the contrasts between the physical beauty of people and landscapes and the austere menace of the guardia civil everywhere. As I read, I remembered troubling conversations I had with Catalan youth who wanted to resist the oppression, but were frightened. Graves' historical perspective has given me a clearer context for their fears and the political situation I barely understood back then.

Graves' prose is elegant, her depiction of people and places vivid, the depth of her personal revelations moving. The book drew me in and propelled me forward like a well crafted novel. I learned a good deal about Graves and her illustrious family, about Catalonia, about Spanish history, and about narrative craft. This is the first book I've read by Lucia Graves, and I look forward to reading many more.
  • Keel
I've not read another book as lovely as this one in a long time! The estimable daughter of Robert Graves creates in beautiful prose an estimable voice of her own, while wearing warm and honorable traces of her father's literary genius; there's a common clarity, and distinction in the language. There's remarkable writing on every page; the ever so gradual reaching deep into the heart of Franco almost by not mentioning him, the destruction of her Spain from within, the passion of her love for her Catalan self, among her many selves- it's a thoroughly important book in every way. The first and last sections work like bookends and are epsecially right; Graves' subtle reflections on her relationship with her mother. This is English prose of the first order. Of course, one has a natural penchant to want to find wonderful amber things in her writing, given one's regard for the work of her father; the interesting thing is that her own voice presents itself right off, so much so that one ends praising even more the virtue of the inheritance, rather than getting lost in the echos. Her reflections on the work of a translator are beautifully woven throughout the book, and reveal a meticulous care for the possibilities of language. The ways in which she chooses to speak of her father in this memoir are memorable; at the oddest, least unexpected moment the narrative will turn and there is Robert Graves, father. This really is an irrepleaceable work of art. I commend it to everyone to read, there is something for every reader in these slender pages, and that surely expresses the consummate perfection of its parts.
  • Rleyistr
Made we want to know about Spanish History, especially the Franco era. Hadn't realised how repressed Spanish women were.
  • Auridora
It was a whim that brought me to Lucia Graves' memoir "A Woman Unknown: Voices from a Spanish Life." I had just finished reading Carlos Ruiz Zafón's "The Shadow of the Wind," and was thoroughly entranced by its soaring lyrical prose. I noticed that the book was translated into English from Spanish and wondered whether the high quality of the prose might owe a great deal to the translator. So, I started investigating Lucia Graves' writings and discovered this exquisite memoir.

I rarely read autobiographies, but once I stared this work, I couldn't put it down--within a few pages, I felt like a spell had been cast. Soon, I was deep into a serene meditation on life--uncommon and fascinating for its vibrant Spanish twist, and subtle feminist slant. Finding this book was like suddenly discovering a refreshing mountain spring after a long summer hike: I had no idea how thirsty I was for a lush literary work dealing with the inner lives of women.

Naturally, most of the work deals with the life of the author, Lucia Graves. She is the daughter of Robert Graves, the famous English poet, novelist, biographer, essayist, scholar, and translator. She was raised on the island of Majorca, a place with a distinct cultural subset from the mainland Catalonian culture of northeastern Spain. She spoke English at home, Majorcan to the village people, and Castilian Spanish in school. Her father taught her a deep abiding love for words and language. There were dictionaries in every room of her childhood home so that the precise word might be found and discussed at any time. Later, as an adult raising her own family in a sterile modern Barcelona suburb, translation became the author's tranquil refuge from the everyday vicissitudes of life.

The book has four distinct themes. First and most importantly, we learn about the interior life and thoughts of Lucia Graves. It is important to note that there is little in this book about the life of her famous father, or the lives of her mother, siblings, children, and husband. The focus of this memoir is personal and inward at all times. Second, we learn about the lives of women who have played important roles in the author's life. She tells us about their strengths--the characteristics that allowed them to make the most of whatever adversity that befell them. Like her own life, she takes the lives of these everyday women and celebrates them. Third, we learn about the author's passion for words and for the painstaking art of translation. Finally, through the stories of the many women that make up the bulk of this book, we learn about the history of modern Spain, from the Civil War to the present day. In particular, we learn about the dynamic culture and people of Majorca and Catalonia.

There is the story of Jimena, Graves' cleaning women when she was a child growing up on Majorca; the story of Blanca, the island's midwife; and Juanita, her cleaning woman a dozen years later when she was a mother raising a family in Barcelona. Graves tells us about Olga, her childhood ballet instructor--a woman who had once achieved prima ballerina status in a major Russian ballet company, but eventually had to settle for a life of ballet instruction in a small Majorcan village. There's the story of Sister Valentina, one of the Catholic nuns who was Graves' teacher and mentor. Graves also delights us with the stories of courageous women from history: Marie Powell, long-suffering wife of John Milton and heroine of a book by her father that she translates into Spanish; and Margarida de Prades, the little-known and nearly forgotten 16th-century Queen of Catalonia. Graves also manages magically to weave into her contemporary life's story, the tale of the Greek goddess Persephone, Queen of the Underworld.

Like bookends holding the work together at the beginning and end, Graves gives us the story of her aging mother as she undergoes a minor operation in Barcelona. Once again, Graves takes this event as an opportunity to celebrate the many lives of the everyday women who were a part of this congenial, gracious, and loving hospital experience.

The Spanish legal term for a divorced woman translates as a "woman unknown." In the early 1990s, Graves became the "Woman Unknown" of the book's title when she and her husband of 26 years agreed to end their marriage. The subtitle, "Voices from a Spanish Life," aptly describe the many stories the author relates about vital Spanish women--unknown women whose lives she honors and memorializes.

This is a remarkable and richly nuanced work of literary prose. I recommend it highly, particularly to women, feminists, and others who may enjoy connecting with the inner dialogue of an astonishing, articulate, and uncommon woman of uncelebrated wisdom.