almediah.fr
» » Sir Francis Drake

Download Sir Francis Drake eBook

by John Sugden

Download Sir Francis Drake eBook
ISBN:
1844137627
Author:
John Sugden
Category:
Historical
Language:
English
Publisher:
Pimlico (June 27, 2006)
Pages:
368 pages
EPUB book:
1144 kb
FB2 book:
1789 kb
DJVU:
1258 kb
Other formats
lit azw mbr mobi
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
450


The Consummate Seaman Sir Francis Drake John Sugden

The Consummate Seaman Sir Francis Drake John Sugden. More than a cruise on the Golden Main-a book of plunder and piracy-or merely the adventures of a superior and charismatic seaman, this is an excellent and highly articulate, carefully documented book of history and comparative religion, that situates Drake within his cultural context, against the background of drastic shifts in social structure, geopolitics and faith.

The Consummate Seaman Sir Francis Drake John Sugden. I chose this book to learn about English explorations and navigation with Sir Francis Drake during the 15 century around the world.

The Consummate Seaman Sir Francis Drake John Sugden

The Consummate Seaman Sir Francis Drake John Sugden.

Sir Francis Drake’s career is one of the most colourful on record. The most daring of the corsairs who raided the West Indies and Spanish Main, he led the English into the Pacific, and cirumnavigated the world to bring home the Golden Hind laden with Spanish treasure

Sir Francis Drake’s career is one of the most colourful on record. The most daring of the corsairs who raided the West Indies and Spanish Main, he led the English into the Pacific, and cirumnavigated the world to bring home the Golden Hind laden with Spanish treasure. His attacks on Spanish cities and ships transformed his private war into a struggle for surivival between Protestant England and Catholic Spain, in which he became Elizabeth I's most prominent admiral and marked the emergence of England as major maritime nation. It deserves to become the standard Drake life

Sir Francis Drake book. John Sugden's book on Drake is both readable and scholarly

Sir Francis Drake book. How well do you know the life of one of Britain’s great maritime. John Sugden's book on Drake is both readable and scholarly. Aside from passages where the author gets caught in a storm of superficial details-much of Drake's activities on land are known but dimly-the book reads as well as a novel. Sugden is thorough in presenting Drake's life from early childhood to his death at sea.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Drake, Francis, Sir, 1540?-1596. Explorers - America - Biography. Explorers - Great Britain - Biography. Admirals - Great Britain - Biography. Voyages around the world - History - 16th century. Great Britain - History, Naval - Tudors, 1485-1603. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on September 24, 2013. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

How well do you know the life of one of Britain's great maritime heroes? Discover the truth behind a man who remains a legendary figure of history more than four hundred years after his death. Sir Francis Drake's career is one of the most colourful on record.

In this comprehensive and astute biography of the great sailor hero, Sugden portrays a complex man of fascinating contradictions. Ambitious, vainglorious and sometimes vindictive, he was also a loyal friend and a warrior of surprising humanity and courtesy.
  • Gann
Brilliantly researched and excellently written but a little dry at times . There are so many surprises in this book but the greatest is that pirate who turned into a national hero by heading off the Spanish Armada was a very compassionate man. It was an age when the victrious sailing boat would haul the losers from the water and look after them well .. He hated two things Catholicism and the King of Spain...but his hatred of the Spanish was based on the fact that the Governor of Mexico broke his solemn word and attacked the British fleet , after promising an armistice .
Good reading
  • Ckelond
Wow incredible book. I loved it and would highly recommend it to anyone with the slightest bit of interest in this period of history.

First the author was very delightful to read. I was often just lost in the enjoyment of the story. I actually felt like I knew Sir Drake personally by the end of the book. The character development was outstanding for biography written 400 years after the death if it's subject.

Second the author had a wonderful subject to write on. Sir Drake was a larger than life character. His accomplishments were almost super human. To top it off he was a gentleman that was easy to like. Biographies about people I like are always so much more fun.

I must admit that it is a fairly long book, certainly not a quick read. However, it was worth every minute of time I put into it.
  • Burking
If your looking for a good biography of the man and his times then this is highly recommended. If on the other hand you want to experience what it was like to go to sea on what appear to be highly unwieldy and barely seaworthy vessels of the late sixteenth century then I would look elsewhere. No real description of the atmosphere and life on the ships, but ample testament to the incredible feats and constitution of this great Englishman.
  • Brightfury
The Consummate Seaman
Sir Francis Drake
John Sugden

More than a cruise on the Golden Main—a book of plunder and piracy—or merely the adventures of a superior and charismatic seaman, this is an excellent and highly articulate, carefully documented book of history and comparative religion, that situates Drake within his cultural context, against the background of drastic shifts in social structure, geopolitics and faith.
Europe in the 16th century was a time of exceptional leaders and remarkable mutations, most of them, despite occasional slips in syntax, carefully researched by this scholarly author. Yet the author in Britain finds a mystery in Spanish America, and never quite sorts it out. North America actually ends in Panama, its southernmost point, since Central America is a political but not a geographical entity. This was actually a recurring question on “Jeopardy”. North America encompasses Alaska, Canada, the United States and Mexico, and technically embraces the Caribbean and its islands, as well as the five nations in so-called “Central America” (Belize (formerly British Honduras), Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and Costa Rica, plus Panama which was originally wrenched by Theodore Roosevelt from its home territory in Colombia. And there begins South America. There was a time when children in Spain were taught only of “America”, and considered it a single continent, therefore justifying the original five Olympic rings, but in all truth there are eight: North and South America taken separately, as well as Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia and Oceania (erroneously grouped together), plus Antarctica. Is the North Pole a continent? No, it is an ice cap. As for his references to “Mexico” or the “Mexican flota”, he means “New Spain” or Spanish ships therein. “Mexico” only became a political entity with the 1810 war of independence from its European mother country.
Back to Drake, one of the twelve sons of a Protestant pastor, and alternately adored and reviled by Queen Elizabeth Tudor who enmeshed him regularly in her intricate plans, as her relations with Spain, France and the Netherlands constantly shifted.
Worthy of note is Drake's clever application of the Elizabethan contention, that it was the occupation and development in formerly unrecognized territories that predisposed a claim of ownership; discovery alone would not suffice. The inhabitants of a land remained entitled to it, she said, despite the self-serving fifteenth century declarations of Pope Alexander VI, the Spanish Borja become Borgia. The Pope, Elizabeth Tudor reminds us, had spiritual, and not territorial authority, thus in a phrase she, and Drake, discarded the Treaty of Tordesillas, which had, with absolute insolence, divided the globe by equal parts assigned respectively to Spain and Portugal. This arbitrary assignation of hegemonies was radically realigned as a result of Drake’s machinations with the pretender to the throne of Portugal, the commercial and religious thrashings of Holland and France, and finally with the defeat, but not the destruction, of the Spanish Armada in 1588.

We would have liked more details on Drake's sailing ventures, particularly the perusing of the California coast and especially the circumnavigation, only the second European excursion of its kind, more extensive and more detailed than the earlier Magellan-Elcano affair, but having proceeded on verbal orders from Elizabeth, written logs were scarce. No evidence to condemn either the pirate or his sovereign, no accounting to Phillip. Yet the fate of hundreds of sailing men is glossed over, the scarcity of victuals, the crowding, the diseases, and they are literarily as well as physically tossed over the sides of contended ships, there to resolve their inglorious destiny.
Drake was the most famous, and the most infamous, seaman of his day. Yet he outlived his glory, the monumentality of his reputation, even the fear engendered by the very mention of his name. “El Draque” was the bogeyman, until he became old, clumsy and conservative. Even success can overextend itself.
  • Garne
Why, oh why, did they not put the glossary of terms at the front of the book? Pictures of the ships would have been a big help. The author uses a lot of phrases that are much more complicated than need be. Drove me crazy.
Otherwise I liked the book. Very well researched and very interesting. Could have used some good maps.
  • The Apotheoses of Lacspor
Better then I expected. Written with a awareness of the human interest for this great man. Extensively researched
and presented. Enjoyable and informative historical novel. I highly reccomend this book to all
history enthusists.
  • Clodebd
I love history so this book was good but at times you do have to do some skimming....especially when author gets a little heavy about what he did on shore...but his time on the water is written well and is exciting
I chose this book to learn about English explorations and navigation with Sir Francis Drake during the 15 century around the world. It's fascinating to observe how Drake developed plain Sailing ships into superior Battle ships, but no matter how sophisticated his ships were, the winds and tides dominated the outcome of a battle against the Spanish Amada.