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Download In My Brother's Image eBook

by Eugene L. Pogany

Download In My Brother's Image eBook
ISBN:
067088538X
Author:
Eugene L. Pogany
Category:
Historical
Language:
English
Publisher:
Viking Adult (October 2, 2000)
Pages:
304 pages
EPUB book:
1416 kb
FB2 book:
1108 kb
DJVU:
1199 kb
Other formats
lrf txt mbr lit
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
589


In My Brother's Image book.

In My Brother's Image book.

In My Brother's Image is the extraordinary story of Eugene Pogany's father and uncle-identical twin brothers born in Hungary of Jewish parents but raised as devout Catholic converts until the Second World War unraveled their family. In eloquent prose, Pogany portrays how the Holocaust destroyed the brothers' close childhood bond: his father, a survivor of a Nazi internment camp, denounced Christianity and returned to the Judaism of his birth, while his uncle, who found shelter in an Italian monastic community during the war, became a Catholic priest

In My Brother's Image is the extraordinary story of Eugene Pogany's father and uncle-identical twin brothers born in Hungary of Jewish parents but raised as devout Catholic converts until the Second World War unraveled their family.

In My Brother's Image is Eugene Pogany's extraordinary story of his father and uncle - identical twin brothers born in Hungary of Jewish parents but raised as devout Catholics until the Second World War unravelled their family

In My Brother’s Image is also the work of a second-generation Holocaust survivor, a son who has gingerly prodded memories from .

In My Brother’s Image is also the work of a second-generation Holocaust survivor, a son who has gingerly prodded memories from his aging parents and pieced together a family history. That was preceded by something even more difficult–asking my father about his mother.

In My Brother's Image: Twin Brothers Separated By Faith After The Holocaust - ISBNdb (books and publications). Eugene Pogany Social Networks Profiles. author: Eugene Pogany.

In my brother’s image

In my brother’s image. Twin Brothers Separated by Faith After the Holocaust. Psychologist Pogany’s grandparents became devout Catholics at this time, and they raised their two boys-Gyuri (later to become George) and Miklos (the author’s father)-as such. George became a priest and was in Italy when WWII erupted.

View Eugene L. Pogany's genealogy family tree on Geni, with over 190 million profiles of ancestors and living relatives. Start your family tree now. Eugene L. Pogany's Geni Profile. In eloquent prose, Pogany portrays how the Holocaust destroyed the brothers' close childhood bond: his father, a survivor of a Nazi internment camp, denounced Christianity and returned to the Judaism of his birth, while his uncle, who found shelter in an Italian monastic community during the war, became a Catholic priest

In a moving memoir of faith in the face of suffering, two twin brothers born Jewish but raised Catholic are divided by the Holocaust, with one returning the Judaism and the other remaining Catholic. 17,500 first printing.
  • Winasana
This book is riveting in a way that a novel never could be. We follow a real family's struggle to survive the appalling hostilities and unspeakable tragedies to which Hungary's Jewish citizens were subjected in the years prior to and during World War II. Pogany's unique work is a sensitive and insightful portrayal of ordinary people caught up in extraordinary times. It is also a moving account of a child's desire to understand the people and events that shaped the lives of his grandparents, his parents, his uncle, his brother and sister and himself.
Conversion to Catholicism was chosen by some Jewish people as a means to circumvent their surrounding atrocities. (This ultimately proved otherwise and Jews who converted were treated as brutally as those who did not.) Pogany's father and uncle (identical twins) followed their parents' route to the Catholic church, with one brother becoming a priest and the other eventually rediscovering his Jewish roots. The psychological interplay of these identical twins is marvelously revealed. The striking similarities, amazing differences and social connection of these twins will captivate and challenge everyone. Their life histories cannot help but deepen our fascination with how we come to be who we are.
  • Silly Dog
I reccoment it to people who are interested history, religion and humanity. It is incredible to read even twins could end up adopting completely different life.
  • Brazil
What an amazing story! It was a well written fascinating read! Pogany is able to communicate so well the feelings of all the characters that every page was real; the story very touching and heartbreaking in places. I highly recommend it!
  • Matty
great
  • Shaktizragore
While probably every survivor of the holocaust has a unique and compelling story to tell about the experience of the holocaust, the author of In My Brother's Image, who is the son of a survior, has written a fascinating account about the impact of the holocaust on the relationship between his father, and uncle, a Jew who became a priest.
From the outset of the book, I was connected with the characters on an emotional level, notwithstanding the fact that the book is not a work of fiction. The historical back drop of Jewish life in Hungary from the early 20th century through the holocaust was enlightening in many respects. While there is no shortage of books about the Jewish community in Germany and Jews in Poland prior to the World War II, this book captures the life of the Hungarian Jewish community in particular. Until I read this book, I had no idea about the significant number of Hungarian Jews who converted to Catholicism. The Jews of Berlin were not unlike the Jews of Budapest, highly assimilated. non-observant etc. The book is so powerful because it deals with so many emotional issues through the very real lives of the author's family: the silence of the Catholic church in Hungary during the holocaust, the relationship between the Jews who converted to Catholicism and their fellow Jews, the "lesson" from the holocaust that it is impossible for a Jew to take on another religion or identity,no matter what efforts a Jew may take to do so, how can one believe in God after experiencing the holocaust etc.
There is a personal and human element to this book that sets it apart. It is a literary "docudrama," if you will, that I could not put down reading; I found it to be compelling on so many different levels.
  • Yar
I hate to disagree with 3 5-star evaluations, but I thought the story was insightful and interesting but I did not find the reading process as easy as another critique stated. If the book was decrased by about 50 pages, I believe it would be even more compelling than it is.
I have read a number of holocaust books and this family did not have it as bad as others, but I assure you all of them were near death except the Catholic Father.
I particularly liked the beginning and end when the author was talking in the first person. A fine read.