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Download Lost Voices of the Edwardians eBook

by Max Arthur

Download Lost Voices of the Edwardians eBook
ISBN:
0007216130
Author:
Max Arthur
Category:
Historical
Language:
English
Publisher:
HarperCollins UK (September 28, 2007)
Pages:
352 pages
EPUB book:
1731 kb
FB2 book:
1888 kb
DJVU:
1830 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.7
Votes:
433


Mail on Sunday Praise for 'Forgotten Voices of the Great War': 'An extraordinary and immensely moving book.

The Times 'The words of the soldiers are as fresh as if they were written yesterday - extraordinary

Start by marking Lost Voices of the Edwardians as Want to Read . I am a sucker for any book about the Victorians or Edwardians so when I spotted Max Arthur’s book in a charity shop I immediately bought it.

Start by marking Lost Voices of the Edwardians as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. It is a compilation of testimony from people who grew up or lived during the Edwardian era, 1901-1910. The memories of mostly ordinary people have been transcribed as small snippets in chapter themes such as childhood, work, suffragettes and military. There is an index at the back if you wish to look up subjects such as The House of Commons or chicken pox.

Max Arthur, bestselling author of the hugely popular Forgotten Voices series, recaptures the day-to-day lives of working people in the Edwardian er. Praise for Max Arthur: & extraordinary and immensely moving book.

Max Arthur, bestselling author of the hugely popular Forgotten Voices series, recaptures the day-to-day lives of working people in the Edwardian era. The Edwardian era is often eclipsed in the popular imagination by the Victorian age that preceded it and World War I that followed. In this wonderful work, Max Arthur redresses this imbalance, combining oral history and images from the rediscovered Edwardian Mitchell and Kenyon film footage to give voice to the forgotten figures who peopled the cities, factories and seasides of Britain.

Max Arthur, bestselling author of the hugely popular ‘Forgotten Voices’ series, recaptures the day-to-day lives of working people in the Edwardian era. The Edwardian era is often eclipsed in the popular imagination by the Victorian era that preceded it and the First World War that followed. In this wonderful work, Max Arthur redresses this imbalance, combining oral history and rare images and rediscovered film stills from the turn of the century to give voice to the forgotten figures who peopled the cities, factories and seasides of Edwardian Britain.

Max Arthur, bestselling author of the hugely popular ‘Forgotten Voices’ series, recaptures the day-to-day lives of. .This book draws together the experiences of people from all walks of life, capturing the first generation that was able to record its experiences on film

Max Arthur, bestselling author of the hugely popular ‘Forgotten Voices’ series, recaptures the day-to-day lives of working people in the Edwardian era. This book draws together the experiences of people from all walks of life, capturing the first generation that was able to record its experiences on film. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Publisher: HarperCollins UKReleased: Apr 17, 2009ISBN: 9780007324286Format: book.

Max Arthur, bestselling author of the hugely popular & Voices' series, recaptures the day-to-day lives of working . Max Arthur served with the RAF and he has written several best-selling oral history books about the twentieth-century in war and in peacetime

Max Arthur, bestselling author of the hugely popular & Voices' series, recaptures the day-to-day lives of working people in the Edwardian era. Max Arthur served with the RAF and he has written several best-selling oral history books about the twentieth-century in war and in peacetime. He lectures on strategy and leadership and writes for the Independent.

The Edwardian era is often eclipsed in the popular imagination by the Victorian era that preceded it and the First World War that followed. This book recaptures the day-to-day lives of working people in the Edwardian era. It draws together the experiences of people from all walks of life. ISBN13: 9780007216130. Release Date: September 2007.

Max Arthur, bestselling author of the hugely popular ‘Forgotten Voices’ series, recaptures the day-to-day lives of worki.

Название книги: Lost Voices of the Edwardians: 1901–1910 in Their Own Words. In a world of high-speed travel and communications, advanced medical science and multi-media entertainment at the touch of a button, it is hard to conceive of a life where it was not unusual for country dwellers to pass a whole lifetime without leaving their native county. A great gulf separated the rich and the poor. For the wealthy, it was a life of comfort, with every whim attended to, while the poorest suffered almost unimaginable deprivation.

Find sources: "Max Arthur" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (May . Arthur, Max (April 2, 2007). Lost Voices of the Edwardians. ISBN 978-0-09-188887-9.

Find sources: "Max Arthur" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (May 2012) (Learn how and when to remove this template message). 1939-02-25)25 February 1939 Bognor Regis, England. Arthur, Max (May 5, 2005). Forgotten Voices of the Second World War. Ebury Press. ISBN 978-0-09-189735-2. Arthur, Max (June 1, 2005). Lost Voices of the Royal Air Force. Hodder & Stoughton.

Combining oral history, rare images, and rediscovered film stills from the turn of the century, this work gives voice to the forgotten figures who peopled the cities, factories, and coasts of Edwardian Britain. This extraordinary period was fueled by a relentless sense of progress and witnessed the invention of many of the technologies now taken for granted. This exciting work draws together the experiences of people from all walks of life, capturing the first generation that was able to record their lives on film and imbuing them with emotional immediacy.
  • Bludworm
Reading this book---simply a compilation of remarks from people who lived through the times---was like sitting and chatting with your oldest relatives at a family reunion. Aside from a brief Introduction by the author, each section contains nothing but personal rememberances. Some remarks are quite brief, others go into amazing detail about the circumstances of the day and their feelings and struggles at the time.

I found the chapter on Childhood fascinating, and found myself shocking my own spoiled children with those tales. Daily Life, Work, Travels, and other chapters were enlightening as well. Most of the interviewees seem to have been from the lower end of the social and economic scale, with a few upper-class exceptions; this seems about right as a representation of that population as a whole.

Overall, a wonderful read! So simple in design---just snippets from interviews, arranged in categories---yet the result is a clear and interesting snapshot of the times.
  • Liarienen
A good insight of that time from people who could remember it. Those were tough days for many people.
  • Mullador
A lot of British slang words and words that I am not familiar with but the stories are fairly interesting.
  • Amarin
This is a rather interesting look at Edwardian England. The author specializes in reviewing archives on particular topics and then compiling selected extracts of these recollections under general headings. I had never quite before seen this technique, and it allows the reader to hear directly from those who lived the experiences under discussion. In this book, the topics include Childhood, Work, Home, Daily Life, Travel, Politics and Military to name some examples. One is struck repeatedly by the extreme poverty that is manifested in these recollections--particularly of children who struggled to get enough to eat or to find a pair of shoes. This was clearly a difficult period for those on the bottom on the totem pole. The book contains a number of contemporary photos which, when added to the written recollections, affords the reader a pretty effective insight into what was going on. However, this approach does have some problems. For example, a disproportionate percentage of the recollections are from lower and working class individuals--and the same individuals' comments appear under a number of topics (each comment identifies the individual making it). So, one wonders how representative these views are of Edwardians generally, or whether they are skewed due to (for some reason) the archives containing more comments from these folks than others more fortunate than they. Nonetheless, a valuable contemporary document of Edwardian England that adds to our understanding and often tugs at the reader's heartstrings.