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Download Setting the Desert on Fire: T. E. Lawrence and Britain's Secret War in Arabia, 1916-1918 eBook

by James Barr

Download Setting the Desert on Fire: T. E. Lawrence and Britain's Secret War in Arabia, 1916-1918 eBook
ISBN:
0393060403
Author:
James Barr
Category:
Historical
Language:
English
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company (February 17, 2008)
Pages:
400 pages
EPUB book:
1740 kb
FB2 book:
1559 kb
DJVU:
1604 kb
Other formats
azw txt azw lit
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
523


Lawrence’s classic Seven Pillars of Wisdom made the Arab revolt a legend and helped turn him into the mythical Lawrence of Arabia

Lawrence’s classic Seven Pillars of Wisdom made the Arab revolt a legend and helped turn him into the mythical Lawrence of Arabia.

Электронная книга "Setting the Desert on Fire: T. E. Lawrence and Britain's Secret War in Arabia, 1916-1918", James Barr

Электронная книга "Setting the Desert on Fire: T. Lawrence and Britain's Secret War in Arabia, 1916-1918", James Barr. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Setting the Desert on Fire: T. Lawrence and Britain's Secret War in Arabia, 1916-1918" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

James Barr spent four years trawling It was T. Lawrence’s classic Seven Pillars of Wisdom that made the Arab Revolt a legend and helped turn the British intelligence officer into the mythical Lawrence of Arabia

James Barr spent four years trawling It was T. Lawrence’s classic Seven Pillars of Wisdom that made the Arab Revolt a legend and helped turn the British intelligence officer into the mythical Lawrence of Arabia. But the intrigue behind the revolt and its startling consequences for the present-day Middle East have remained a mystery for nearly one hundred years. James Barr spent four years trawling declassified archives in Europe and crossing the hostile deserts of the Middle East to re-create the revolt as the international drama it really was.

James Barr is the author of Setting the Desert on Fire. Barr not only looks at Lawrence's role in the desert revolt of 1917 to 1918 but also the convoluted dealings of Britain and France in the Sykes-Picot accord and its consequences for the Middle East today. There are also photographs of many of the people and places mentioned in the text.

It seems to the British a good idea secretly to encourage an Arab revolt

The Allies are struggling in the Great War. The Ottoman Sultan calls for a pan-Islamic jihad against all non-Muslims except Germans. But Sharif Husein, ruler of the holy city of Mecca, is smarting under Turkish rule, fomenting Arab nationalism and lobbying the British to support him. It seems to the British a good idea secretly to encourage an Arab revolt.

James Barr spent four years trawling declassified archives in Europe and crossing the hostile deserts of the Middle . Скачать с помощью Mediaget. com/Setting the Desert on Fire: T. Lawrence and Britain's Secret War in Arabia, 1916-1918.

James Barr spent four years trawling declassified archives in Europe and crossing the hostile deserts of the Middle East to re-create the revolt as the international drama it really was. A colorful cast of Arab sheiks, British and French soldiers, spies, and diplomats come together in this gripping narrative of political maneuvering, guerrilla warfare, and imperial greed.

T. Lawrence's classic Seven Pillars of Wisdom made the Arab revolt a legend and helped turn him into the mythical "Lawrence of Arabia

Barr turns history into a drama, with bright writing and a fascinating cast of characters. T. Lawrence's classic Seven Pillars of Wisdom made the Arab revolt a legend and helped turn him into the mythical "Lawrence of Arabia.

James Barr spent four years trawling declassified archives in Europe and crossing the hostile deserts of the . Include any personal information. Mention spoilers or the book's price. 0) 50 characters minimum.

It was T. Lawrence’s classic Seven Pillars of Wisdom that made the Arab Revolt a legend and helped turn the British intelligence officer into the mythical Lawrence of Arabia

It was T. This book has good potential, telling the tale of the Arab revolt against the Turks in WWI, but spends too much time describing, in much more than needed detail, the many day to day meetings between this tribal chief and that British officer, who traveled when to where, and which dispatch said this and that to some other diplomat back in France or. England or wherever.

Greed and intrigue combine explosively in this gripping tale of how the mercurial Lawrence of Arabia changed the Middle East forever.

It was T. E. Lawrence’s classic Seven Pillars of Wisdom that made the Arab Revolt a legend and helped turn the British intelligence officer into the mythical “Lawrence of Arabia.” But the intrigue behind the revolt and its startling consequences for the present-day Middle East have remained a mystery for nearly one hundred years. James Barr spent four years trawling declassified archives in Europe and crossing the hostile deserts of the Middle East to re-create the revolt as the international drama it really was. A colorful cast of Arab sheiks, British and French soldiers, spies, and diplomats come together in this gripping narrative of political maneuvering, guerrilla warfare, and imperial greed. Setting the Desert on Fire is a masterly account of a key moment in the history of the Middle East, and a portrait of Lawrence himself that is bright, nuanced, and full of fresh insights into the true nature of the master mythmaker.
  • Arryar
Scholarly but very readable account of the Arab Uprising. I liked Barr's extensive use of sources other than T.E. Lawrence. His description of how and why Britain decided to support a backwater Middle Eastern revolt in the first place is very well written. Britain was pouring money into Arabia; without T.E. Lawrence's organizational skills that money would have been wasted, the funds would have been cut off, and the Revolt would have failed. The Arabs may feel they got a raw deal, but it was probably the best deal possible at the time.

Those expecting a novel (the cover art may fool you) or an easy read will be disappointed. The title is from Lawrence's description of Emir Feisal in Seven Pillars of Wisdom, and Lawrence took the photograph used for the cover. (He used photography as an archeologist and map maker before the war.) The book is well sourced; it has a bibliography, an index, footnotes, maps, and a list of people. The list was very helpful, because this is a story with dozens of characters. Barr inserts little descriptions of places he visited during his research. I found these interesting. Some places haven't changed much in a hundred years; other places (like Aqaba) are completely transformed.

Setting the Desert On Fire isn't about Lawrence of Arabia, it is about Britain's role in the Arab Revolt. Lawrence was an important part of the story, so he's used as the fulcrum. The romantic image of Lawrence of Arabia was used to sell the book. This is unfortunate, but I'm glad I wasn't put off by the publisher's marketing.
  • Oreavi
Well worth the read for several reasons: Gives the reader a better perspective of the extremely complex situation. Includes information from the German side I have not seen before. Provides information on the present state of many historic sites. I would like to see more from the Turk and German side in any future attempts to deal with this. I assume that angle has been written but never published widely in English.

Chapter 19 on the Dera episode is perhaps somewhat unkind. Of course one cannot not be perfectly clear on the single missing page in Lawrence's diary. I would have like to have seen photos of the adjacent pages, a mention of the possibility that Mrs. Shaw may have removed it, a mention of evidence going against the author's theory (in that there is a statement of a military doctor who treated Lawrence soon after the Dera incident and there are statements by other colleagues saying that they did not question that the event did in fact occur and why).

One never is able to chose the order of their books, but this book is best savored after reading Seven Pillars of Wisdom (1922 Oxford Edition), Safety Last, and Orientations. Better to read the word of TEL's fellow officers before taking on the modern perspective.

The author obviously loves his subject and has done his work extremely well.
  • invasion
For anyone who doubts the adage "that those who ignore the lessons of history are condemned to repeat them" then this is the book for them. Barr not only looks at Lawrence's role in the desert revolt of 1917 to 1918 but also the convoluted dealings of Britain and France in the Sykes-Picot accord and its consequences for the Middle East today.
The book is well researched with copious notes and references and extensive bibliography. There are also photographs of many of the people and places mentioned in the text. The book examines the reason for Britain's involvement in the region, the tensions between the India Office and its support for the ibn Saud family and the Egypt Office and its support for the ibn Husain family and the tensions between the Arab tribes themselves and the lack of a clear aim for the revolt. It also examines in some detail how the British government wanted to distance itself from the Sykes-Picot accord as the war progressed and the French insistence that it be honoured.
The only criticism I have is that the author has a tendency to interpose his own observations of the sites of events in the middle of the text about those events without the benefit of separate paragraph. Apart from this the book is an excellent read and well worth its purchase for anyone interested in the region, the desert revolt or T. E. Lawrence.
  • Flarik
This book has good potential, telling the tale of the Arab revolt against the Turks in WWI, but spends too much time describing, in much more than needed detail, the many day to day meetings between this tribal chief and that British officer, who traveled when to where, and which dispatch said this and that to some other diplomat back in France or England or wherever. As a strict history it does cover the subject, but it's a somewhat boring read unless you are really interested in the politics. Recommended with caution.
  • Low_Skill_But_Happy_Deagle
If you enjoyed the movie "Lawrence of Arabia" or read TE Lawrence' 7 Pillars of Wisdom, then you will really like this book. It gives you the truth of the actual events, combat, and political machinations that created the Middle East of today - and the continuing problems between tribes (now governments) and their origins.

Well worth the read.
  • Ddilonyne
After reading other books about and by T.E. Lawrence (including Seven Pillars of Wisdom), this book added important context to better understand the people and events that were part of the war in the desert during WWI. It helped clarify in particular some points about Lawrence's role in leading the Arab revolt, his achievements and troubles and how contemporary events in the Middle East still reflect what was then set in motion.
  • Phenade
A well written history of the Arab revolt that illuminates some of the background maneuvering of the British involvement in the Middle East. It gives you a better understanding of the roots of the problems western governments are now having earning the trust of the Arab peoples.
This was a refreshing change from the usual 7 Pillars extracts. It provides a different aspect to Lawrence's operations in Arabia and well worth reading for both the specialist and the general reader.