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Download In Search of Fatima: A Palestinian Story eBook

by Ghada Karmi

Download In Search of Fatima: A Palestinian Story eBook
ISBN:
1844673685
Author:
Ghada Karmi
Category:
Historical
Language:
English
Publisher:
Verso; Second Edition edition (July 7, 2009)
Pages:
452 pages
EPUB book:
1480 kb
FB2 book:
1522 kb
DJVU:
1283 kb
Other formats
mobi lrf lrf azw
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
539


It is a well-written memoir of a woman who spent her childhood in Palestine, her young adulthood in England, and her adulthood in limbo between the Arab world and England. It is also an amateur history of the British Mandate in Palestine and the devastation caused by the creation of Israel. Finally, it is a psychological self-study of the effects of dislocation, alienation, and the difficulties of assimilation

The book is also remarkable in its lack of rancour.

It enables the reader to understand and to empathise with the psychological dislocation of exile that continues to fuel the Palestinian cause. Karmi left Jerusalem in April 1948 when she was nine, a month before the creation of the Jewish state. The book is also remarkable in its lack of rancour. Karmi is naturally highly critical of Israeli policy, but there is no hint of anti-semitism, which, she shows clearly, was entirely alien to Arab culture.

Ghada Karmi’s acclaimed memoir relates her childhood in Palestine, flight to Britain after the catastrophe, and coming of age in Golders Green, the north London. com User, March 16, 2003. G. Karmi's book presents a side of the Palestinian/Israeli conflict that is seldom seen. Through the eyes of this little girl (8-9 years of age) we see the tragedy that has been inflicted on the stateless Palestinian people through no fault of their own. Ghada writes of her family's terrifying escape from Jerusalem under Israeli gunfire-leaving their home and possessions behind.

Ghada Karmi (Arabic: غادة كرمي‎, Ghādah Karmi) is a Palestinian doctor of medicine, author and academic. She writes frequently on Palestinian issues in newspapers and magazines, including The Guardian, The Nation and Journal of Palestine Studies. She is a fellow and lecturer at the Institute of Arab & Islamic studies at University of Exeter. Karmi was born in Jerusalem to a Muslim family. Her father, Hassan was Palestinian while her mother was Syrian.

Ghada Karmi was born in Jerusalem and trained as a doctor of medicine at Bristol University

It speaks for the millions of people all over the world who have lived suspended between their old and new countries, fitting into neither. Ghada Karmi was born in Jerusalem and trained as a doctor of medicine at Bristol University. She established the first British-Palestinian medical charity in 1972 and was an Associate Fellow at the Royal Institute for International Affairs.

Ghada Karmi writes simply and poignantly

Its author, a committed physician, is desperate for the wounds to heal; History, however, refuses to oblige. Ghada Karmi writes simply and poignantly. Here is a story of our time, exile and dispossession. This book must be read by young Palestinians, Israelis, Americans, Europeans, and Arabs, to truly understand and appreciate the only solution that will bring a lasting Peace in Palestine. 4 people found this helpful.

Ghada grew up in a Jewish area of London. More information about. She discussed her identity struggles living as an Arab in an English country where the majority of sentiments lay with the Israelis. After her remarks she answered questions from members of the audience.

New York: Verso, 2002

New York: Verso, 2002. Ghada Karmi divides her autobiography into three distinct parts, which correspond to the common-if not the archetypal-phases of the Palestinian experience: First, the events leading up to the Nakba, the war, and the exodus from Palestine; second, the initial refusal to accept the finality of exile followed by the struggle for and with identity, and the often futile attempt to lay. down roots in alien soil; and third, the redemptive reconnection with the Palestinian past and the effort to join in the battle for justice through political action.

Ghada Karmi’s acclaimed memoir relates her childhood in Palestine, flight to Britain after the catastrophe, and coming of age in Golders Green, the north London Jewish suburb. A powerful biographical story, In Search of Fatima reflects the author’s personal experiences of displacement and loss against a backdrop of the major political events which have shaped conflict in the Middle East. Speaking for the millions of displaced people worldwide who have lived suspended between their old and new countries, fitting into neither, this is an intimate, nuanced exploration of the subtler privations of psychological displacement and loss of identity.
  • Rko
Karmi's life story is so engaging that I was sorry to come to the end. Although she is obviously biased in favor of Palestine and against Israel (with good reason), she does not allow that predisposition to inordinately sway her analytical skills.

As Karmi expertly blends her personal story of exile with the more general account of Palestinian dispossession, she never succumbs to the temptation either to villify all Jewish people or to portray the conflict in simplistic terms. Overall, this narrative is an excellent story regardless of whether a person is interested in the political overtones.
  • Light out of Fildon
A captivating Memoir of a middle class Palestinian family, one of more than 700,000 Palestinians uprooted and displaced from their historic homeland, Palestine, in 1948. In this memoir Ms. Karmi has documented a sample of the continuing suffering and injustice brought upon the Palestinian People by the creation of the Illegitimate State of Israel. While expressing the complex social and cultural feelings, hardships, and struggles in coping with the brutality of displacement and diaspora, Ms. Karmi remains optimistic and hopeful that Justice and Right will prevail.
This book must be read by young Palestinians, Israelis, Americans, Europeans, and Arabs, to truly understand and appreciate the only solution that will bring a lasting Peace in Palestine.
  • SupperDom
this was a great book for me because I could identify with the author on so many levels - the feeling that you don't really belong anywhwere, the searching for an identity and the sadness and lonliness you feel when no one, not even your own family, understands what you are going through. She articulated so many things that I experienced growing up that I never fully understood until I read this book. Very well done.
  • grand star
Read it !!!
  • Kalv
Ideal for a gift to my husband....he do not expected ...he did not found here in Mexico city....Idont know if Ican wait until christmas
  • Kage
In Search of Fatima is an amazing book in several regards. It is a well-written memoir of a woman who spent her childhood in Palestine, her young adulthood in England, and her adulthood in limbo between the Arab world and England. It is also an amateur history of the British Mandate in Palestine and the devastation caused by the creation of Israel. Finally, it is a psychological self-study of the effects of dislocation, alienation, and the difficulties of assimilation.

The book begins with the author's childhood in Palestine and the effects of the 1948 exodus of Palestinians from their homeland. As a Jew used to thinking of the creation of Israel as a partial reparation for the horrors of the Holocaust, the utter abandonment of the Palestinians by the British, the aggressive destruction of Palestinian villages by the Israelis, and the plight of everyday Palestinians was heart wrenching and eye-opening. It was, for me, the most compelling part of the book.

The second part of the book deals with Ghada's life in Britain as a teenager and young adult. Her unthinking assimilation into British culture, the gradual isolation from her family of origin, and her friendships with British Jews were described with a remarkable self-insight. Never have I read such a detailed description of the process of assimilation and how that process requires a "forgetting" and denial of self.

The last part of the book was the most difficult for me to appreciate. It describes the author's gradual politicization and, in my opinion, near radicalization. Although I could appreciate her desire to reintegrate with her Arab roots, which given the circumstances, required an awareness and sympathy for the Palestinian movement, I found her growing acceptance and even semi-approval of militant/terrorist actions to be disturbing. My personal opinion is that until both Israelis and Palestinians give up terrorism, peace is unattainable and a solution will never be found. Despite the pride and national self-respect that Palestinian military victories give the Palestinian people, I feel that it is the wrong path and will only lead to more violence.

Despite this, I found the book remarkable and would recommend it to everyone, because the Palestinian viewpoint has been lost to the West and needs to be heard.