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by Norma Lorre Goodrich

Download Guinevere eBook
ISBN:
0060922923
Author:
Norma Lorre Goodrich
Category:
Historical
Language:
English
Publisher:
Perennial; Reprint edition (June 1, 1992)
Pages:
288 pages
EPUB book:
1415 kb
FB2 book:
1288 kb
DJVU:
1839 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
638


Dedicated to the late Dr. Norma Lorre Goodrich, Professor, Premier King Arthur authority . This site is dedicated to the late Dr. Norma Lorre Goodrich Inside you will find information on her life, her career, her published books & her unpublished books

Dedicated to the late Dr. Norma Lorre Goodrich, Professor, Premier King Arthur authority, Author of over 20 books. Norma Lorre Goodrich Inside you will find information on her life, her career, her published books & her unpublished books.

com's Norma Lorre Goodrich Page and shop for all Norma Lorre Goodrich books. Are You an Author? Help us improve our Author Pages by updating your bibliography and submitting a new or current image and biography. Check out pictures, bibliography, and biography of Norma Lorre Goodrich.

GOODRICH, NORMA LORRE (MRS. JOHN H. HOWARD), French and Comparative Literature educator: b. Huntington, V. May 10. .Goodrich followed the book with related works on Merlin, Guinevere and the Holy Grail. May 10, 1917; d. Claremo. nt, C. September 19, 2006. Charles Edmund and Edyth (Riggs) Falby; m. Joseph Marcel Andre Lorre, Dec 10, 1943 (div. June 1946): 1 son, Jean-Joseph; m. John Hereford Howard, Jan. 20, 1964, until his death 1995; BS cum laude, Univ V. 1938; postgrad. In her 1994 work, "Heroines: Demigoddess, Prima Donna, Movie Star," Goodrich explores the women of operas, novels and screenplays.

Norma Lorre Goodrich, a prolific author, was an Arthurian scholar known for her unconventional theory that King Arthur was Scottish -not English or Welsh

Norma Lorre Goodrich, a prolific author, was an Arthurian scholar known for her unconventional theory that King Arthur was Scottish -not English or Welsh. She was a professor of comparative literature and writing for many years at the University of Southern California and the Claremont Colleges. Books by Norma Lorre Goodrich. Mor. rivia About Guinevere.

by. Norma Lorre Goodrich. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. t on November 23, 2011.

The third book in the acclaimed historical series that began with King Arthur and Merlin. An expert on mythology reveals the truths behind the legend of Guinevere, describing her complex nature, her aloof beauty, and the fascination she has held for fans of Arthurian legend for centuries.

Now, for the first time, Norma Lorre Goodrich traces the history and legend of the Holy Grail, snipping away all the fictions and myths that have accrued around this evocative treasure to bring us the true, historical facts of one o.

Now, for the first time, Norma Lorre Goodrich traces the history and legend of the Holy Grail, snipping away all the fictions and myths that have accrued around this evocative treasure to bring us the true, historical facts of one of the most venerated of Christian objects.

Goodrich, Norma Lorre was born on May 10, 1917 in Huntington, Vermont, United States. Daughter of Charles Edmund and Edyth (Riggs) Falby.

Norma Lorre Goodrich. Join Waitlist 1. The ancient myths.

According to Goodrich, poor Guinevere won the protection of Lancelot, supposedly her younger brother; and, as Druid priestess, she assisted him in his initiation rites by visiting the Underworld. He became known as her lover, Goodrich says, when several hundred years after their death around 542, someone mistranslated the word & for &. Having masterfully re-created the major characters and events of Arthurian romance in King Arthur (1986) and Merlin (1987), Goodrich brings her scholarly skills, her prodigious knowledge of sixth-century Britain, and her impassioned style to vindicate Guinevere and rescue her from the obscurities of time.

An expert on mythology reveals the truths behind the legend of Guinevere, describing her complex nature, her aloof beauty, and the fascination she has held for fans of Arthurian legend for centuries
  • Shakar
I liked it
  • Dordred
She is not only the leading authority on King Arthur, but also an honest discussion of other voices.
  • Questanthr
This whole non-fiction series is excellent for historical speculation and reference. Mary Stewart and Stephen Lawhead also wrote excellent Arthurian fiction with much research behind them
  • Tholmeena
Norma Goodrich's *Guinevere* promises to find the historical truth behind the figure of Guinevere. The blurb on the back, the quoted reviews on the cover, and the introduction all state that Goodrich offers proof here of the historical Queen. I had just finished the wonderful *Journey to Avalon* by Barber and Pykitt, which is full of information on the probable figure behind Arthur, but which only devotes a few paragraphs to his wife. So, I was looking for some more information about her.
Goodrich doesn't dig into archaeology or history, though; the entire book is based on two medieval writings, the "Prose Lancelot" and the work of Geoffrey of Monmouth, and takes these works as absolute fact. She delves into confusing episodes in the epics, and into symbols the writers associate with Guinevere, and attempts to find the roots underlying them. Since much medieval romance was based on an earlier oral tradition, that's all fine and good--except that the more Goodrich finds, the less historical it sounds. Instead of Gwenhwyfar, queen of the Britons, we get Guanhumara, goddess of death and initiation, a mythic rather than a historical figure. Now, I don't generally mind mythic explorations onto the Arthur legends. I gave the Matthews' *Ladies of the Lake* five stars. But the Matthews were up-front about what they were doing. Yes, the Arthur cycle is based both on history and myth. But don't promise me history and give me myth.
  • Iraraeal
So, even worse than the first two volumes of this series. She again takes a mainstay of the Arthurian universe and sorts through the romances until she gets a semi-coherent story. Goodrich manages to take a symbolic woman who had stood for Arthur's kingdom and makes her some sort of Pictish queen using an (imaginary) knowledge of Pictish and later and less credible romances that she carefully searches for the information she wants.
  • Flas
A friend urged me to read this book knowing that I had some interest in Arthurian lore and in feminist theory. The author has me puzzled on both accounts. It's not just that she posits some unusual ideas, it's the flat statements of fact she makes. I know of nothing that backs up some of her conclusions-- and the author does not support these statements with any citations. The first one that really brought me up short was something like, Guinevere's marriage contract with Arthur made her his archivist. That is not a direct quote but it's close enough. Marriage contract? Where did this document come from? And why would she be made her husband's archivist?
So, if you are looking for ideas for speculative fiction about Guinevere this is the place to look. If you are looking for facts about Dark Age Britain then look elsewhere.
  • Andromakus
The dust jacket of Guinevere bills Norma Lorre Goodrich as the world's most important living Arthurian scholar -- dust jackets, of course, are completely unbiased sources. Maybe I'm missing something, but this book does not lead me to believe anything of the kind. In fact, in the end I was reduced to skimming, her egoism was so off-putting. She claims that she is qualified to do an unbiased study of Guinevere because she is an American (excuse me?), and later describes thirteenth century poet and translator Layamon as "an ignorant, ugly English monk." All questions of manners aside, how does she know he was ugly? It's clear that she is more interested in hurling insults his way than sticking to the facts.

This lack of good taste wouldn't be as troubling if her scholarship were less dubious. She often contradicts herself, as when she says that the "best source for this story of Guinevere is the voluminous Prose Lancelot manuscript," then writes on the next page, "Nothing in the Prose Lancelot comes very close to Guinevere's real life, marriage, betrothal, and alliance." If that is true, why does she regard it as the best source for these very events? And how does she know what Guinevere's life was really like? This is a problem throughout the book, in which she makes truth claims without explaining her reasoning process or providing citations. She seems bent on treating the Lancelot-Guinevere love story as fact (while denying any sexual relations between them) yet never offers an argument as to why he is left out of all the chronicles and doesn't appear until the French romances. Later she mentions a marriage contract between the queen and Arthur, of which I had never before read, yet fails to provide a reference.

Far from living up to the claims made by this book's dust jacket, Goodrich scarcely comes across as a professional.
My Mother named me Guinevere. I am thankful to Norma Goodrich for clearing up the issue of the name being associated with infidelity and dishonor. Often times I would be the brunt of jokes relating to Lancelot. At least now I have some rebuttal. Being a historian myself, putting the Arthurian legend in the 5th Century is makes sense. Goodrich's style does get off track and at times gives too much information without conclusion, causing confusion. I agree with other reviewers that her writing should be better. The writer John McPhee comes to mind as one who can reveal a subject such as geography/geology and make it exciting.