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Download The Guardsmen eBook

by Simon Ball

Download The Guardsmen eBook
ISBN:
0002571102
Author:
Simon Ball
Category:
Historical
Language:
English
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers Ltd; First Edition edition (May 17, 2004)
Pages:
480 pages
EPUB book:
1483 kb
FB2 book:
1155 kb
DJVU:
1371 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
351


Lyttelton is clearly Simon Ball's favourite and one sees why. Unfussed, making good decisions without dithering, he handled rationing, the .

Lyttelton is clearly Simon Ball's favourite and one sees why. Unfussed, making good decisions without dithering, he handled rationing, the Egyptian crisis, De Gaulle and Malaya with sense and success.

The theme of Simon Ball's brilliant book is a race, willingly entered into by these four men, for power and glory

From the playing fields of Eton via the horrors of the Western Front to the. The theme of Simon Ball's brilliant book is a race, willingly entered into by these four men, for power and glory. Politics is not a flat race, it's a steeplechase,’ as Churchill once told Macmillan.

Ball's examination of the gulf between Tynan's generation and those who fought in the trenches ought to be compulsory reading for anyone who still admires the self-serving shallowness of 60s satire.

Pragmatists like the Guardsmen did not let this reverie last for long. Before the war they had been committed to seeking conventional worldly success. Within weeks of the end of the war they were again embracing this goal. The fact that none of them remained a soldier was not of their own choosing. As early as 1916 Lyttelton had applied for a permanent commission in the Grenadier Guards. 4 Crookshank too explored the possibility at the end of the war. In 1918 they both applied to remain in the regiment. They were both men in good odour with dominant figures in the Guards.

Simon Ball won an Open Exhibition to read history at Brasenose, Oxford. He studied for his P. under David Reynolds at Christ's College, Cambridge and was head of modern history at Glasgow University. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. From the playing fields of Eton via the horrors of the Western Front to the pinnacle of political power in 20th-century Britain - a brilliant collective biography of Harold Macmillan, Lord Salisbury, Oliver Lyttl. From the playing fields of Eton via the horrors of the Western Front to the pinnacle of political power in 20th-century Britain - a brilliant collective biography of Harold Macmillan, Lord Salisbury, Oliver Lyttleton and Harry Crookshank.

This book draws on the Stockton constituency correspondence written between 1924 and 1945. These books have found their way into Lincolnshire Record Office. The coverage of Crookshank’s life in these two sources is fairly complete

This book draws on the Stockton constituency correspondence written between 1924 and 1945. Much of this correspondence is ephemera. There are, however, letters which reflect on wider political events. Those letters dealing with the minutiae of politics are much less self-conscious than the diaries and have the value of immediacy. The coverage of Crookshank’s life in these two sources is fairly complete.

Скачать на ЛитРес Penn, invalided home, having been shot in both legs, wrote up his own game book as, ‘BEAT – Cour de l’Avoué: BAG – Self’.

The best gentleman cricketer of his generation was felled by a ball bowled by a professional fast bowler in a charity match. Incompetently treated, he died from acute peritonitis a few days later. The prime minister, Asquith, delivered his encomium in the House of Commons. Penn, invalided home, having been shot in both legs, wrote up his own game book as, ‘BEAT – Cour de l’Avoué: BAG – Self’. Despite Lord Salisbury’s patronage, the trio remained fearful that they would become trapped in the wrong part of the military machine. We are having trouble about our commissions,’ Lyttelton wrote anxiously.

The theme of Simon Ball's brilliant book is a race, willingly entered into by these four men, for power and glory. Biographies Politicians & Historical Figures. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

The YMCA were a useful tool in pursuit of that goal. Macmillan was convinced that ministerial office was just round the corner. Like his model, Edward Wood, he intended to make his mark with a short book publicizing the ginger group. Вы ознакомились с фрагментом книги. Для бесплатного чтения открыта только часть текста. Приобретайте полный текст книги у нашего партнера: Полная версия книги (всего 10 форматов).

From the playing fields of Eton via the horrors of the Western Front to the pinnacle of political power in 20th-century Britain -- a brilliant collective biography of Harold Macmillan, Lord Salisbury, Oliver Lyttleton and Harry Crookshank. Harold Macmillan, Oliver Lyttleton, Bobbety Cranbourne and Harry Crookshank all arrived at Eton in 1906, all served on the Western Front in the same battalion of the Grenadier Guards and all served in Cabinet under Winston Churchill during the Second World War. They helped Churchill regain Downing Street in 1951 and once more joined his Cabinet as senior figures. These four men were friends, sometimes enemies, as they argued and fought their way up the political ladder for over forty years. The theme of Simon Ball's brilliant book is a race, willingly entered into by these four men, for power and glory. 'Politics is not a flat race, it's a steeplechase,' as Churchill once told Macmillan. And through the collective biography, Ball presents an extraordinary portrait of political ambition and intrigue from the First World War until Macmillan's resignation as Prime Minister in 1963. Tracing the lives of his four protagonists through the trauma of the trenches, their involvement in the Treaty of Versailles and in rebuilding Europe after the Great War. All four Guardsmen were in Churchill's Cabinet during the Second World War and the book gives a penetrating account of the workings of the British government at War. As he traces the story through the Suez crisis to Macmillan's premiership, he describes the rise of socialism, appeasement, the unravelling of empire, social welfare, etc. The ruthlessness of politics is brilliantly illustrated -- particularly in his portrait of Macmillan's dealings with former friends when he found his political career, finally, in the ascendant. Ball has based the book on years of original research in many archives and he has had exclusive access to the Salisbury papers, closed to the public until 2022. The Guardsmen is therefore a work of significant scholarship that presents a gripping account of the workings of politics during the 20th century.
  • Kearanny
I found this book exceptionally well-written & the intertwined narratives of the 4 men easy to follow. This is an under-appreciated segment of British history which is well described here
  • Kirizan
The Duke of Wellington is reputed to have said that the "Battle of Waterloo was won on the playing fields of Eton." Simon Ball's deftly written comparative biography, "The Guardsmen, Harold Macmillan, Three Friends, and the World They Made", examines the lives of four men who may be thought of as being among the last generation for which Wellington's adage has more than folkloric meaning.

The four Guardsmen were: Harold Macmillan, Oliver Lyttelton, Bobbety Cranborne and Harry Crookshank. Cranborne (the future Lord Salisbury) and Lyttelton were members of the aristocracy. Macmillan and Crookshank were from newer wealth, known then as "new men". The four entered Eton together in 1906. They all joined the Grenadier Guards in 1914 and saw service during the First World War. Conservatives all, they each entered politics in the 1920s. They all held positions in the British cabinet under Winston Churchill during the Second World War. One of the group, Harold Macmillan served as Prime Minister from 1957 until his resignation in 1963. Although Macmillan may be the only one of the group familiar to American readers they each were very well know figures in Britain during their time.

The Guardsmen's story really begins not on Eton's playing fields but on the killing fields of World War I France. Lyttleton, Macmillan and Crookshank fought with valor and distinction. On the same day, September 15, 1916, fighting with a mile of each other in the trenches, Macmillan and Crookshank were horribly wounded and Lyttleton was awarded a DSO (a medal for valiant service) for his heroic acts. Macmillan and Crookshank's injuries were catastrophic. Macmillan right arm and left leg never worked properly again. Crookshank was castrated by shrapnel. Cranborne served only briefly at the front.

Following the War the Guardsmen made their way into Parliament. Ball's exploration of the parallel lives of the Guardsman enables the reader to get a bird's eye view of British political life from the 1920s through the 1960s. Ball's treatment of the saga of these men is intriguing in many respects. Ball's examination of the parliamentary experiences of these four men in the 1930s, for example, provides a unique perspective on British political life in the years leading up to the Second World War. It is easy to forget that during the premiership of Neville Chamberlain that it was not Winston Churchill who stood out as a threat to Chamberlain's appeasement policies but Anthony Eden. Churchill was thought of by all as a has been. The Guardsmen were considered "Edenites. Eden, for all his intelligence, comes across as a timid and vacillating political rival notoriously incapable of making tough political decisions. Referred to by his foes and friends as Hamlet he reminded me more of Leon Trotsky in that both managed to fall ill or absent themselves from the center of action at critical moments in time and were made to look like political amateurs by men who, though perhaps less talented, had no compunction about grasping for power.

The Guardsmen, all on the anti-appeasement side of the aisle, found roles in Winston Churchill's war-time cabinet and the book takes us through their (second) war years. The Conservative Party's return to power in 1951 saw the Guardsmen reach the peak of their achievements. The story here centers around Macmillan, who served as Minister of Housing under Churchill and Chancellor of the Exchequer under Eden until becoming Prime Minister in 1957 after Eden's Suez Canal fiasco. Macmillan fought his fellow Conservatives and insisted on an economic policy that promoted employment rather than monetarist policies likely to create higher unemployment rates. Macmillan's tenure was also marked by the commencement of independence for former British colonies in Africa. He angered white settlers in Rhodesia and South Africa and their English allies (including a profoundly bitter Cranborne) by noting with no small degree of accuracy that " The Africans are not the problem in Africa, it is the Europeans who are the problem." This was followed in short order by his famous "Winds of Change" speech in which he noted that: "The wind of change is blowing through this continent. Whether we like it or not, this growth of national consciousness is a political fact."

As he notes in his conclusion, by the end of their lives the notion of public service (at least by the upper classes) was quaint at best and worthy of scorn at worst. These men are thought of, to the extent they are thought of at all, as antiques from an age long gone by. However, even while showing us their many flaws, Ball makes it clear that there was a certain sense of honor and integrity about these men. (This is particularly true of Macmillan.) It was once said sarcastically of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher that she was not noblesse and was disinclined to oblige. Ball takes us back to a time and place where the concept of noblesse oblige still had some residual meaning.

In the hands of a lesser writer "The Guardsman" might have come across as merely a wistful yearning for "the good old days" of Conservative Party aristocratic rule. Instead, "The Guardsmen" paints a literate and informative portrait of the lives of these men and the impact the searing experiences of the First World War had on their public lives.

"The Guardsmen" left this reader wondering why and when we stopped expecting our leaders to possess core values of honor and integrity and as such it has value far greater than a mere look back in time.