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Download The Sugar King of Havana: The Rise and Fall of Julio Lobo, Cuba's Last Tycoon eBook

by John Paul Rathbone

Download The Sugar King of Havana: The Rise and Fall of Julio Lobo, Cuba's Last Tycoon eBook
ISBN:
0143119338
Author:
John Paul Rathbone
Category:
Leaders & Notable People
Language:
English
Publisher:
Penguin Books; Reprint edition (July 26, 2011)
Pages:
320 pages
EPUB book:
1943 kb
FB2 book:
1304 kb
DJVU:
1922 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.8
Votes:
857


Book by Rathbone, John Paul. This book was a pleasure to read for several reasons.

Book by Rathbone, John Paul. I was reading this book in an apartment in Vedado, not far from where Lobo spent most of his mature years, so in a way this book had an extended effect, spilling over into my daily life. Lobo is still a rather controversial figure in Cuba and is well known especially a This book was a pleasure to read for several reasons.

Rathbone, John Paul 2010 The Sugar King of Havana. The Rise and Fall of Julio Lobo Cuba's Last Tycoon. Penguin Press, London. eISBN 97811010458914. To readers interested in late nineteenth and twentieth century Cuba, "The Sugar King of Havana" is a must read. Andrew J. Rodriguez Award-winning author of "Adios, Havana," a Memoir.

Автор: Rathbone John Paul Название: Sugar King of Havana .

Автор: Rathbone John Paul Название: Sugar King of Havana: The Rise and Fall of Julio Lobo, Cuba& Last Tycoon Издательство: Random House (USA) Классификация: ISBN: 1400168759 ISBN-13(EAN): 9781400168750 ISBN: 1-400-16875-9 ISBN-13(EAN): 978-1-400-16875-0 Обложка/Формат: MP3 CD Дата издания: 0. 8. This much-needed book will give you the tools needed to help your teen regulate his or her emotions

Электронная книга "The Sugar King of Havana: The Rise and Fall of Julio Lobo, Cuba's Last Tycoon", John Paul Rathbone.

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The sugar king of Havana : the rise and fall of Julio Lobo, Cuba’s last tycoon, John. Cuba has known many rich men since Christopher Columbus first introduced sugarcane to the island. At the start of the twentieth century, one Cuban sugar baron tiled the floors of his Havana palace with Italian marble bedded down in sand imported from the Nile.

Julio Lobo y Olavarria (30 October 1898– 30 January 1983) was a powerful Cuban sugar trader and financier. John Paul Rathbone, The Sugar King of Havana: the Rise and Fall of Julio Lobo, Cuba's Last Tycoon (2010). From the late 1930s to 1960, when he left Cuba to go into exile, Lobo was considered the single most powerful sugar broker in the world. His assets then included 14 sugar mills, over 30,000 acres of land, a bank, an insurance company, and offices in Havana, New York City, London, Madrid, and Manila.

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Like many in Cuba’s upper-middle class, Lobo studied in the United States

Like many in Cuba’s upper-middle class, Lobo studied in the United States. Returning to Cuba in 1919, Lobo became involved in the family’s sugar business and saw the industry experience an intense cycle of growth and contraction from 1920 to 1933-the years of the Alfredo Zayas government and the Gerardo Machado dictatorship. His marriage in 1932 to María Esperanza Montalvo, a descendant of sugar industry elites, opened doors for Lobo to the Cuban bourgeoisie.

Changes in the sugar content of the water of the coconut have been followed during ripening and germination. Thereafter non-reducing sugars appear,. To a certain extent all governments try to "put their best foot forward;" however the present Cuban government is given to this a great deal more than most. Thus I applaud the John Paul Rathbone for his careful attention to reality when discussion discussing the alleged or real killings at the Senado Sugar Mill in 1933 (pages 90-100)

"Fascinating...A richly detailed portrait." -Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times Known in his day as the King of Sugar, Julio Lobo was the wealthiest man in prerevolutionary Cuba. He had a life fit for Hollywood: he barely survived both a gangland shooting and a firing squad, and courted movie stars such as Joan Fontaine and Bette Davis. Only when he declined Che Guevara's personal offer to become Minister of Sugar in the Communist regime did Lobo's decades-long reign in Cuba come to a dramatic end. Drawing on stories from the author's own family history and other tales of the island's lost haute bourgeoisie, The Sugar King of Havana is a rare portrait of Cuba's glittering past—and a hopeful window into its future.
  • Kerahuginn
This is a well written book and the material is fascinating. It's scope is limited to discussion of a few families, the lives that they created in Cuba, and the impact of the revolution upon them. It is not a broad description of the revolution and the factors leading up to it. These are only dealt with briefly. One message that does emerge from the book is that for all of its social, political, and economic challenges, pre-revolution Cuba did have some viable industry. The revolution essentially destroyed this. We cannot know whether the average Cuban is better-off than he would have been without the revolution. It's not possible to conduct a controlled experiment and we cannot know how Cuba would have evolved without the revolution. However, the book does demonstrate that an enormous amount of wealth was destroyed and with it jobs, income, and economic vibrancy.
  • Tygrafym
I read this book before a trip to Cuba which will include Julio Lobo’s Napoleon collection (or at least its remnants). I found this book to be a fascinating if somewhat roundabout insight into Cuba in the middle 60 years or so of the 20th century. The audible book was beautifully read. Lobo is a unique character.
  • Keel
I loved the narrative about Senor Lobo. My one criticism is that the aurhour's obsession with weaving his own Cuban family into the story severely detracts from it. In some spots entire chapters seem dedicated to his reminiscing and bragging about them. I thought I was buying a book about Julio Lobo, but the book is only about half that.
  • Whatever
JP Rathbone shares an insider’s perspective of the fascinating life, towering successes and ultimate decent of Julio Lobo - an international business titán who single-handedly moved the world’s sugar markets which for decades fueled the island’s politics, economy, culture. Truly a great read!
  • Wafi
A technical note on the machine gun

Rathbone, John Paul 2010 The Sugar King of Havana.
The Rise and Fall of Julio Lobo Cuba's Last Tycoon.
Penguin Press, London. eISBN 97811010458914

To a certain extent all governments try to "put their best foot forward;" however the present Cuban government is given to this a great deal more than most. Thus I applaud the John Paul Rathbone for his careful attention to reality when discussion discussing the alleged or real killings at the Senado Sugar Mill in 1933 (pages 90-100).

First I do know that many killings occurred at that time and that unlike the well known incidents at Hotel Nacional and Atares, are not generally know. For instance on my family's land at Guama in the northern foothills of the Sierra Maestra (there are other Guamas in Cuba and in many places in Latin America) a few unreported killings did occur (see as yet unpublished "Love and War in Cuba).

Second the real nature of the events in El Senado as the author points out is as unformed as those in Macondo. Thus, I (and others) examined the photographic evidence presented on page 97.

The machine gun in question is an 1895 Colt-Browning "potato digger" a weapon design already 38 years old at the time of these events and quite obsolete (the Rough Riders in Cuba had two which used 7 mm ammunition and were tripod mounted see Al Summrall, A. [accessed 8-16-10]. The Colt model 1985 Automatic Machine Gun. Spanish American War Website, [...]). The Cuban government had many improved machine guns at that time, augmented even more by the capture of the extremely well equipped Gibara expedition in 1931.

If one goes to site Modern Firearms site [...], and compares images it seems for it used an smooth, rather than finned, barrel that this weapon is not the commercial model, but the earliest limited number run.

Thus this image--given the hats--is a Rural Guard photo, and thus could have been taken during the 1906, 1912 or 1917 rebellions.

Therefore, this photograph does not prove the point made in this book, and the author is commended for his ambiguity about the matter.
  • Vrion
As a descendant of Bernabe Sanchez, and son of a former Galban, Lobo & Co. associate,
I consider "The Sugar King of Havana" the most fascinating biography of Cuba's most peculiar and mesmerizing businessman.

Intertwined with the intriguing story of Julio Lobo's life, this well researched book offers the reader a most accurate and unbiased sequence of historical events that ultimately culminated in Cuba's deceptive revolution.

To readers interested in late nineteenth and twentieth century Cuba, "The Sugar King of Havana" is a must read.

Andrew J. Rodriguez
Award-winning author of "Adios, Havana," a Memoir.