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Download Too Close to the Sun: Growing Up in the Shadow of My Grandparents, Franklin and Eleanor eBook

by Curtis Roosevelt

Download Too Close to the Sun: Growing Up in the Shadow of My Grandparents, Franklin and Eleanor eBook
ISBN:
1458759644
Author:
Curtis Roosevelt
Category:
Leaders & Notable People
Language:
English
Publisher:
ReadHowYouWant (January 21, 2013)
Pages:
456 pages
EPUB book:
1570 kb
FB2 book:
1744 kb
DJVU:
1524 kb
Other formats
doc mobi txt azw
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
342


Curtis Roosevelt was three when he and his sister, Eleanor, arrived at the White House soon after their .

Curtis Roosevelt was three when he and his sister, Eleanor, arrived at the White House soon after their grandfather’s inauguration. Blending self-abasement, humor, awe and affection, Too Close to the Sun is an intimate portrait of two of the most influential and inspirational figures in modern American historyВ-and a thoughtful exploration of the emotional impact of growing up in their irresistible aura.

Start by marking Too Close to the Sun: Growing Up. .Curtis was the son of Anna Roosevelt – the daughter and eldest child of Eleanor and Franklin. This book was quite fascinating and held my attention

Start by marking Too Close to the Sun: Growing Up in the Shadow of My Grandparents, Franklin and Eleanor as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. He was born in 1930 and much of his formative years were spent at the White House and at his great grand-mother’s house in Hyde Park, the birthplace of Franklin. This book was quite fascinating and held my attention. Written by FDR's oldest grandson, the book provided a unique perspective on the popular president and his wife Eleanor.

Curtis Roosevelt (formerly Curtis Roosevelt Dall) is the second grandchild and oldest grandson of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt. The author was three years old when FDR became president

Curtis Roosevelt (formerly Curtis Roosevelt Dall) is the second grandchild and oldest grandson of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt. The author was three years old when FDR became president. His mother Anna, (the president's only daughter) was going through a divorce at the time, and so moved into the White House with her two children. Anna Eleanor Dall (Sistie) and Curtis (Buzzie) became immediate media darlings. Although his mother remarried and they moved to the West Coast, the White House and the Big House at Hyde Park were always "home" to Curtis.

We thought that hope and youth had triumphed and that the embodiment of those qualities had inherited, if not the Earth, at least the power to make the world a better place. Almost 50 years on, Barack Obama goes to the White House weighed down by even greater expectations

We thought that hope and youth had triumphed and that the embodiment of those qualities had inherited, if not the Earth, at least the power to make the world a better place. Almost 50 years on, Barack Obama goes to the White House weighed down by even greater expectations.

Curtis Roosevelt is the second eldest child of Anna Eleanor Roosevelt and the oldest grandson of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Eleanor Roosevelt. In 1964, he joined the Secretariat of the United Nations, where for eighteen years he held various positions in the international civil service sector.

Curtis Roosevelt knew what it was like to live with a president. His grandfather was Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Until I wrote my bookToo Close to the Sun: Growing Up in the Shadow of My Grandparents, Franklin and Eleanor, I hadn’t thought too closely about this extraordinary experience of mine. But then I had to buckle down and think it through. I did, and a lot of illusions went out the window.

JFEW Eleanor Roosevelt Scholars. Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Long-Lost Letters to Daisy Suckley. Book Discussions, Full Video, Public Figures. My Most Important Task Eleanor Roosevelt and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Highlights From the Collection: Roosevelt Memorabilia. Women Take the Lead: From Elizabeth Cady Stanton to Eleanor Roosevelt, Suffrage to Human Rights. See How They Ran! FDR & His Opponents: Treasures from the New York Historical Society. Other Roosevelt Legacy Sites.

Curtis Roosevelt was three when he and his sister, Eleanor, arrived at the .

Curtis Roosevelt was three when he and his sister, Eleanor, arrived at the White House soon after their grandfather's inauguration. Blending self-abasement, humor, awe and affection, Too Close to the Sun is an intimate portrait of two of the most influential and inspirational figures in modern American history - and a thoughtful exploration of the emotional impact of growing up in their irresistible aura. См. также: Другие биографии.

Growing Up with Franklin and Eleanor. Potomac Books Until I wrote my book Too Close to the Sun: Growing Up in the Shadow of My Grandparents, Franklin and Eleanor, I hadn’t thought too closely about this extraordinary experience. An imprint of the University of Nebraska Press. com/TriggerPhoto; bottom image courtesy FDR Library. Author photo courtesy of Marlène Collin. All photos courtesy of Curtis Roosevelt. Until I wrote my book Too Close to the Sun: Growing Up in the Shadow of My Grandparents, Franklin and Eleanor, I hadn’t thought too closely about this extraordinary experience of mine.

Curtis Roosevelt was three when he and his sister, Eleanor, arrived at the White House soon after their grandfather's inauguration. The country's ''First Grandchildren,'' a pint-sized double act, they were known to the media as ''Sistie and Buzzie.'' In this rich memoir, Roosevelt brings us into ''the goldfish bowl,'' as his family called it - that glare of public scrutiny to which all presidential households must submit. He recounts his misadventures as a hapless kid in an unforgivably formal setting and describes his role as a tiny planet circling the dual suns of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt. Blending self-abasement, humor, awe and affection, Too Close to the Sun is an intimate portrait of two of the most influential and inspirational figures in modern American history - and a thoughtful exploration of the emotional impact of growing up in their irresistible aura.
  • Mavivasa
I read this interesting book a couple of years ago and recently re-read it on my Kindle PaperWhite. At times, the descriptions of some exciting event was so involved that it made me feel I was part of the thrill of being in the presence of Franklin, Eleanor, "Granny" and Buzzie's world. A beautiful, well-written book. Very frank, so to speak! Definitely, one of my favorite books!
  • ALAN
This is an intimate look at a famous White House family that comes with unexpected details from a child's point of view - like being instructed not to sit on FDR's lap. It's also a tale of the second and third generations of Roosevelts and their problems coping with the high bar set for them by two high-achieving grandparents. It increased my already intense admiration and respect for the sacrifices all such families make in the service of their country.
  • Kezan
I'd be hard pressed to find a book about Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt that I didn't adore, but unfortunately, Too Close to the Sun: Growing Up in the Shadow of My Grandparents, Franklin and Eleanor by Curtis Roosevelt is just average. Curtis Roosevelt (formerly Curtis Roosevelt Dall) is the second grandchild and oldest grandson of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt.

The author was three years old when FDR became president. His mother Anna, (the president's only daughter) was going through a divorce at the time, and so moved into the White House with her two children. Anna Eleanor Dall (Sistie) and Curtis (Buzzie) became immediate media darlings. Although his mother remarried and they moved to the West Coast, the White House and the Big House at Hyde Park were always "home" to Curtis. The author's family recognized early on that Curtis enjoyed the attentions that were directed at FDR a little too much. "The idea that I might be suffering from growing up in the orbits of my grandfather and grandmother, whose powerful auras were doubled-edged, was untenable." Being that Curtis was the second oldest grandchild, he did get to witness many events and meet many important people during his grandfather's presidency.

I enjoyed the parts about FDR, Eleanor and the White House. For instance, FDR insisted on having a live Christmas tree in the White House, lit by actual candles. The White House staff was aghast. One can only imagine real candles on a 20 foot tree in the East Room! However, I was almost embarrassed reading some facts about the author's childhood. For instance, this poor, little rich boy never slept alone, unbuttoned a button, went to the bathroom by himself, or flushed a toilet until he was 5 years old and ready for kindergarten. The Sun in this story is definitely Franklin. Curtis adored his Papa. But I got the feeling that while Curtis admired Eleanor, his love was reserved for Sara Delano Roosevelt (Franklin's mother, called Granny). He writes that his Granny was not a villain. "The characterization, coupled with decades of my grandmother's polite but obviously shaded remarks about her mother-in-law, set in motion her ogress's reputation, a mantle that continues to hang around Sara Delano Roosevelt's shoulders." From the hundreds of books that I have read about the Roosevelt family, I believe this reputation is well-founded. Curtis also ends the book with FDR's death, thus reinforcing my feeling that for the author, Eleanor did not receive equal billing. While Too Close to the Sun did provide some amazing photographs, it is lacking an index that I would have found helpful.

I will add Too Close to the Sun to my Roosevelt collection. Although I feel it's just average, at least it's better than any of the books written by his uncles.
  • Kahavor
The cover design of the print edition, featuring a photo of the author and his sister riding along with their President grandfather, pretty much signals the focus of this book: the view of the FDR White House from the perspectives of a child. As such, there's not a lot of detail about the FDR Presidency itself. Yet, that seemed apt here, as the author dishes one second-guessed-childhood-memory-through-hindsight after another, primarily with a focus on, well, the struggle of being a child. Okay, an overly-protected, generally-ignored, sort of famous/upper-crust child.

What's interesting is how the struggles of that one child - our author - pretty much reflects the entire Roosevelt clan's struggle to reconcile fortune and station with its various notions of noblesse oblige. At times, it reads like a P.G. Wodehouse piece. Except, instead of wannabe British aristocrats running hither and thither often to hilarious effect, Mr. Roosevelt's characters follow scripts that are simultaneously selfless and self-centered, often to more embarrassing or tragic effect (depending, for example, on your views of the extraordinary number of failed marriages amongst this clan). Still, he treats his memories and these family-member characters with a fair amount of deference, seemingly hesitant to lay too much criticism at any one person's feet. Not a bad balance to strike while writing what comes off, at times, as a life-long therapy-in-progress project.

Moreover, that cover photo is the first of quite a number of interesting pictures that illustrate the author's remembrances. The Kindle edition (nicely formatted, by the way) renders these photos quite well.