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by Fawn McKay Brodie

Download Thomas Jefferson eBook
ISBN:
0553201506
Author:
Fawn McKay Brodie
Category:
Leaders & Notable People
Language:
English
Publisher:
Bantam Books (April 1975)
EPUB book:
1619 kb
FB2 book:
1805 kb
DJVU:
1502 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.7
Votes:
492


Fawn McKay Brodie (September 15, 1915 – January 10, 1981) was an American biographer and one of the first female professors of history at UCLA, who is best known for Thomas Jefferson: An Intimate History (1974), a work of psychobiography, and No Man.

Fawn McKay Brodie (September 15, 1915 – January 10, 1981) was an American biographer and one of the first female professors of history at UCLA, who is best known for Thomas Jefferson: An Intimate History (1974), a work of psychobiography, and No Man Knows My History (1945), an early and still influential biography of Joseph Smith, the founder of the Latter Day Saint movement.

Brodie, Fawn McKay (1974). Thomas Jefferson: An Intimate History, . Norton, 594 pages; Book. Brown, David Scott (1998). Thomas Jefferson: A Biographical Companion, Abc-Clio Incorporated, 266 pages

Brodie, Fawn McKay (1974). Thomas Jefferson: A Biographical Companion, Abc-Clio Incorporated, 266 pages; ISBN 978-0-87436-949-6; Book. Brown, Stuart Gerry (1963) Thomas Jefferson, Washington Square Press, 247 pages; Book. Browne, Stephen H. (2003). Jefferson's Call for Nationhood: The First Inaugural Address, Texas A&M University Press, 155 pages; ISBN 978-1-58544-252-2; Book.

Fawn M. Brodie was professor of history at the University of California, Los Angeles, and author of several noted biographies . Brodie does not idolize Thomas Jefferson. Thank goodness for her ability to take as non-partisan a view of this man as possible

Fawn M. Brodie was professor of history at the University of California, Los Angeles, and author of several noted biographies, including Thomas Jefferson and The Devil Drives: A Life of Sir Richard Burton. Annette Gordon-Reed is the Charles Warren Professor of American Legal History at Harvard Law School. Thank goodness for her ability to take as non-partisan a view of this man as possible. What I learned from this book is that Thomas Jefferson was admirable, indeed, but first and foremost, utterly human.

Fawn McKay Brodie (September 15, 1915 – January 10, 1981) was a biographer and one of the first female professors of history at UCLA, who is best known for Thomas Jefferson: An Intimate History (1974), a work o. .

Fawn McKay Brodie (September 15, 1915 – January 10, 1981) was a biographer and one of the first female professors of history at UCLA, who is best known for Thomas Jefferson: An Intimate History (1974), a work of psychobiography, and No Man Knows My History (1945), an early and still influential non-hagiographic biography of Joseph Smith, J. the founder  .

Brodie, Fawn McKay, 1915-1981. Jefferson, Thomas, 1743-1826, Jefferson, Thomas, Jefferson, Thomas. Toronto : Bantam Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

Fawn McKay Brodie, a historian whose biography of Thomas Jefferson was a best-seller in 1974, died of cancer Saturday night at St. John's Hospital. She was 65 years old. ''Thomas Jefferson: An Intimate History,'' Mrs. Brodie's last published book, focused on an affair that Jefferson allegedly had with a slave woman. Mrs. Brodie had taught recently in the history department of the University of California at Los Angeles.

Thomas Jefferson by Bernstein, R. B. Paperback Book The Cheap Fast Free Post. Was: Previous price£12.

It was in reference to a letter that Jefferson wrote to a lady friend describing his passionate reaction to a painting depicting Abraham, Sarah and the slave girl. reply flag . message 3: by Mike (new). Jan 09, 2009 05:55PM. Mod. AGR does indeed reference Brodie's "Freudian" spin on the TJ-Hemings relationship. This was, in my opinion, a very charitable statement. Personally, I think Brodie was a loon who should've worked for the National Enguirer.

Thomas Jefferson: An Intimate History by Brodie, Fawn McKay Book The Cheap Fast. War Message to Congress by Thomas Jefferson (English) Paperback Book Free Shippi. From AustraliaFormat: PaperbackTopic: HistoryAuthor: Thomas Jefferson. Addresses to the Indians by Thomas Jefferson (English) Paperback Book Free Shipp.

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An ambitious, perceptive portrayal of a complex man, this best-selling biography broke new ground in its exploration of Jefferson's inner life. Here for the first time we meet Jefferson as a man of feeling and passion. With a novelist's skill and meticulous scholarship, Fawn M. Brodie shows Jefferson as he wrestled with issues of revolution, religion, power, race, and love-ambivalences that exerted a subtle but powerful influence on his political writing and his decision making. The portrait that results adds a whole new depth to those of the past.
  • Delalbine
This book is nothing short of amazing. After reading this book, I am in awe of Fawn Bodie's abilities to finally give us an intimate glimpse into the life of one of America's most celebrated and most private presidents. This is the third biography I have read on the subject of Thomas Jefferson and it is the first, to actually provide a genuine human portrait of the man, his life, his loves, his motivations, including the joys & very real pain that truly bring this man to life. Contrary to what some of the negative reviewers say, Fawn Brodie definitely did her homework on this book. It's clearly thoroughly researched. And as to the charge that she draws conclusions based on the facts she's presenting -- yes, she does do that in some cases, and she does it carefully, intelligently, and well. While I may not always agree with the Brodie's insights, I respect her willingness to separate opinion from fact.

Regardless of the heat kicked up by the issue of Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings -- this book is about much more than that relationship. It delves deeply into the relationships between Jefferson and Adams, touches throughout on his relationship with deep & abiding friend, Madison, reveals much detail about his relationship with Callendar, and on. In terms of going into great detail about the women in Jefferson's life -- well, yes, that's there in spades -- and for a reason. Jefferson's relationship to the women in his life reveals much about the character of the man who ranks among the most revered of founding fathers. Brodie does not idolize Thomas Jefferson. Thank goodness for her ability to take as non-partisan a view of this man as possible. What I learned from this book is that Thomas Jefferson was admirable, indeed, but first and foremost, utterly human. His complex relationship with his slaves as Fawn Brodie describes it is borne out by a recent (2012) Smithsonian article on Thomas Jefferson -- the facts are all there. Fawn Brodie just had the courage to put many of these facts together, perhaps, before other historians did.

If you are interested in an intimate portrait of what life at Monticello must have been like while inhabited by the real Thomas Jefferson, read this.
  • HappyLove
I had read with great interest Fawn Brodie's book, "No Man Knows My History" about Joseph Smith and the earliest, rigorous history of the beginnings of the Mormon Church - and its founding documents, "revelations" to Joseph Smith.

When I heard on NPR the great historian Jon Meecham (who wrote another, excellent and more recent book on Jefferson) recommend Brodie's book, I jumped at the chance and bought this book that was published in the early '70s.

It was fully direct and yet equally honest in describing Jefferson's relationship with Sally Hemings as well as the time and society in which this behavior was politely "tolerated". The point Meecham made is that each of us, great and small, is flawed. He is fascinated by how such qualities can lie, side by side, within the same individual.

This was a pioneering book from a remarkable scholar and former Mormon, excommunicated after she would not submit her book on Smith to LDS editors/censors.

You will like this book on Jefferson if you are a student of history and how this amazing country, The United States, came into being. Without Jefferson, it would have been vastly-less.

RCC 18 MAR 2013
  • Opimath
Altho controversial when released back in 1972-it still is today with new refutation on the Sally Hemmings claim of his backstage relation with his slave mistress.

No matter as a psychological biography it still packs a lot of info and revelation on this egnigma of a man.

Wonderful book for an ardent fan like me and even for an objective reader who loves finely woven details into a nicely done tapestrey of a man and his times. Nice copy too!
  • TheMoonix
Fawn Brodie, who died 30 years ago, was no stranger to harsh criticism. Her masterfull biography of Joseph Smith caused her to be excommunicated by the saints. Her biography of Thomas Jefferson incurred the wrath of historians who wrote multi-volume hagiographies of a demigod. She wrote about the man. He lived beyond his means. He owned, bought, and sold slaves even though he championed emancipation. The hagiographers glossed over his secrets. Fawn Brodie didn't. The introduction to this edition by Annette Gordon-Reed reinforces Brodie's account of Jefferson's life.

Everyone loved Thomas Jefferson. I now know why. Who, really, was the father of our country? Who, of all our presidents, was truly a lover of peace?
  • Kann
No, this isn't the best biography of Thomas Jefferson ever written--that remains to be done, incorporating ALL the evidence amassed thus far, and leaving it to readers to think for themselves. But I'm disheartened that most of the reviews here say more about the readers than the book. And what they say is rather sad and frightening. Splitting statistical and scientific hairs about the DNA evidence, etc., may comfort some, but why it is so incredibly scary to so many people that this man may have indeed had an affair with a Black woman escapes--and intrigues--me. The fact that it may have been a love affair, not just the usual ugly business with which we're usually confronted seems to me actually more proof of Jefferson's character--and uncommon intellect and ability to deal with the complexities of racial matters--not his lack of same.
No, he didn't handle it as well as some of us might have wished--his Notes on the State of Virginia prove how incredibly strange his views of non-whites could be. But if this man, who knew so well what the public would do with such a liaison, continued it, grappling daily with it, finding a place for it and a way to reconcile it all within the confines of Monticello and beyond...I salute him. Brodie, and all others, be damned...