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by John Ferling

Download John Adams: A Life eBook
ISBN:
0195398661
Author:
John Ferling
Category:
Leaders & Notable People
Language:
English
Publisher:
Oxford University Press; Reprint edition (February 9, 2010)
Pages:
544 pages
EPUB book:
1832 kb
FB2 book:
1294 kb
DJVU:
1963 kb
Other formats
lit mobi lrf txt
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
548


John E. Ferling (born 1940) is a professor emeritus of history at the University of West Georgia. As a leading historian in the American Revolution and founding era, he has appeared in television documentaries on PBS, the History Channel, C-SPAN Book TV, and the Learning Channel.

John E. John Ferling was born in 1940 in Charleston, West Virginia. Ferling grew up in Texas City, Texas H. .

Dr. Ferling gets into his relationships, both professional and personal, all though while painting with the scenes of his life with vivacious narration and scholarly insight

Dr. Ferling gets into his relationships, both professional and personal, all though while painting with the scenes of his life with vivacious narration and scholarly insight. I cannot recommend this biography enough for the educated laymen or serious students of pinnacle figures of the American Revolutionary period.

The book brings to life an exciting time, an age in which Adams played an important political and intellectual role. Indeed, few were more instrumental in making American independence a reality.

is a 2001 biography of the Founding Father and second . President John Adams, written by the popular American historian David McCullough, which won the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for Biography or Autobiography. It has been made into a TV miniseries with the same name by HBO Films. Since the TV miniseries debuted, an alternative cover has been added to the book showing Paul Giamatti as John Adams.

John Ferling's masterful John Adams: A Life is the most comprehensive single-volume biography of the man who succeeded George Washington in the presidency and shepherded the fragile new nation through the most dangerous of times.

John Ferling has nearly forty years of experience as a historian of early America

John Ferling's masterful John Adams: A Life is the most comprehensive single-volume biography of the man who succeeded George Washington in the presidency and shepherded the fragile new nation through the most dangerous of times.

John Adams: A Life by John Ferling (1992). Page Smith’s was the first and David McCullough’s is the most famous, but John Ferling’s biography of John Adams, A Life, may be the best. The oldest book on the list, it is, to me, the most clever as it brings to life conversations between Adams and a host of 18th-Century European writers, including Rousseau and Voltaire, by taking the marginalia Adams left in the books of those authors and turning it into a fascinating argument. It makes the reader feel as if he or she is eavesdropping on a discussion involving some of the greatest thinkers of the day - or ever.

John Ferling's masterful John Adams: A Life is a singular biography of the man who succeeded George Washington in the presidency and shepherded the fragile new nation through the most dangerous of times.

John Ferling has nearly forty years of experience as a historian of early America. The author of acclaimed histories such as A Leap into the Dark and Almost a Miracle, he has appeared on many TV and film documentaries on this pivotal period of our history. In John Adams: A Life, Ferling offers a compelling portrait of one of the giants of the Revolutionary era.Drawing on extensive research, Ferling depicts a reluctant revolutionary, a leader who was deeply troubled by the warfare that he helped to make, and a fiercely independent statesman. The book brings to life an exciting time, an age in which Adams played an important political and intellectual role. Indeed, few were more instrumental in making American independence a reality. He performed yeoman's service in the Continental Congress during the revolution and was a key figure in negotiating the treaty that brought peace following the long War of Independence. He held the highest office in the land and as president he courageously chose to pursue a course that he thought best for the nation, though it was fraught with personal political dangers. Adams emerges here a man full of contradictions. He could be petty and jealous, but also meditative, insightful, and provocative. In private and with friends he could be engagingly witty. He was terribly self-centered, but in his relationship with his wife and children his shortcomings were tempered by a deep, abiding love. John Ferling's masterful John Adams: A Life is a singular biography of the man who succeeded George Washington in the presidency and shepherded the fragile new nation through the most dangerous of times.
  • Negal
Although I give credence where it is do to David McCullough's incredibly brilliant one-volume work on the life of John Adams, I feel that Dr. Ferling has done an even more remarkable job here of truly ironing out the sociological, geographical, political, philosophical and historical implications of our third president in this work.

What this biography tackles brilliantly and with considerable erudition is the character of John Adams; the politician, the statesman, the lawyer - and most forgotten - the friend and the father. Born into a family of modest if not lower than so means, John Adams' rise from childhood to be the most well-traveled statesman of his time (with the possible exception of Benjamin Franklin) is simply a joy to read about.

Dr. Ferling gets into his relationships, both professional and personal, all though while painting with the scenes of his life with vivacious narration and scholarly insight. I cannot recommend this biography enough for the educated laymen or serious students of pinnacle figures of the American Revolutionary period.
  • Moogugore
WOW...........This is great biography. I thoroughly enjoyed David McCullough's 'John Adams'. I absolutely loved John Ferling's treatment of this Founding Father. Mr. Ferling has a magical quality of presenting American history during the Revolutionary Period. He has great editorial sensitivity in selecting what subject matter to cover in depth and what to slip over with brief gracefulness. He knows how to present his material in an entertaining, yet historically accurate manner. This is one of the best biographies I have ever had the pleasure to read. After reading both this and Mr. McCullough's version of Mr. Adams' life, it is a bit disturbing that we do not honor Mr. Adams as he deserves we should. Certainly, one picks up from readings that he had some personality traits that were not particularly attractive, but when we become aware of the harsh sacrifices that he and his family endured for this nation, his accomplishments clearly deserve our respect and admiration. I'm grateful to have come across this masterful work and highly recommend it to anyone remotely interested in American History, and biography in general. I have read numerous books by Mr. Ferling and have thoroughly enjoyed each one and look forward to more from him in the future. As mentioned previously, this is Great Biography.
  • Rko
Our second President was an interesting man who made real contributions to the founding of our country and its early years. His talent lay in hard work, depriving himself of his family and home for years at a time to pursue his ambitions. As President, subverting an imminent war with France did much to maintain the integrity of our early country. This was well written and very balanced. Highly recommend.
  • Cordanara
Ferling is one of those authors of whom you expect great things. I was not disappointed with his take on John Adams. With the exception of the fact that he did not earn a Pulitzer for his version like David McCullough did, I found little to disappoint with "John Adams: A Life".

One word of advance counsel: Before you get comfortable, you will need close access to a dictionary while you read this work. Since I like to learn new words, I was not too frustrated. However, by the end of the book, it did get just a little old. Words like captious, sybarite, querulous, peculation, irascible, supercilious, truculence, vertiginous and hirsute are just a few of the many examples of very uncommon words littering the pages of "John Adams: A Life" that kept me searching. But don't take my word for it. Dig in and see for yourself. I don't say this as a criticism, unless you are wanting an unchallenging and mundane read. I read to learn, and this book was right up my alley.

Besides learning new words, I learned a lot of new things about our second president, as well as his times, the revolution he participated in, and his contributions to our national origins. I also learned more about his cousin, Samuel Adams than I had read in other books. In fact, Ferling drove me straight into the arms of Mark Puls ("Samuel Adams, Father of The American Revolution" and "Henry Knox, Visionary General of The American Revolution") when I finished his work on John. I have read Puls' work on Henry Knox and I know he is good, too.

In short, to me, a good writer is one who creates interest, curiosity, and a desire to learn more. Like David McCullough and a host of other great writers, John E. Ferling does just that. I am totally satisfied with what I have read in this great work, but also sufficiently unsatisfied that I am inspired to learn more. John Ferling did his job well and I highly recommend this result of his efforts.

Five stars.
  • Shalinrad
Ferling's narrative clips along at just the right pace. Given his access to Adams' extensive personal letters and journals, Ferling is adept at incorporating what he's reading in those letters into his narrative without just simply quoting them at length. Instead, he interprets them, sometimes calls them out for the inaccuracies or inconsistencies they contain, and best of all, only refers to them in context of the larger narrative he is building for us.

I like the way the author shows us all the warts and bumps of Adams' character, while at the same time pointing out that Adams' has probably been criticized more so for vanity, pettiness, etc. because his personal notes are much more personal in nature than any of his contemporaries. Washington, for example, wrote much about his daily expenses, his "turneps", etc., but very little about his inner thoughts.