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Download Jay J. Armes: Investigator eBook

by Frederick Nolan

Download Jay J. Armes: Investigator eBook
ISBN:
0380017563
Author:
Frederick Nolan
Language:
English
Publisher:
Avon; 1st Edition edition (November 1977)
EPUB book:
1358 kb
FB2 book:
1378 kb
DJVU:
1638 kb
Other formats
lit mbr docx azw
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
588


Jay J. Armes: Investigator. Mass Market Paperback. Recently I rediscoverd Jay J. Armes. I remember him from the 1970's when his toy action figure and mobile investigation unit were released by the Ideal Company.

Jay J. I purchased his book "Jay J. Armes Investigator (by Jay J. Armes as told to Frederick Nolan)" from a used vendor and read it in one sitting. The stories are related to the reader in a very comfortable manner and flow from one to the other as if from the lips of a master storyteller.

He was educated in Liverpool and Aberaeron, Wales. Armes (born Julian Armas; August 12, 1932) is an American amputee, private investigator, and actor. He is known for his prosthetic hands and a line of children's action figures based on his image. Armes was born Julian Armas to Mexican-American parents Pedro and Beatriz in Ysleta, a low-income area near El Paso, Texas, now a southeast El Paso neighborhood.

I purchased his book "Jay J. I was hooked and loved it! I must admit that I was disappointed the book ended after only 234 pages.

Armes, Jay J; Nolan, Frederick . 1931- joint author. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Armes, Jay J, Private investigators. New York : Macmillan. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on May 1, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014). Armes; Frederick Nolan. We guarantee the condition of every book as it's described on the Abebooks web sites

Jay J. ISBN 10: 0025032003, ISBN 13: 9780025032002. We guarantee the condition of every book as it's described on the Abebooks web sites. Armes, Private Investigator, PM MAGAZINE. From my PM Magazine days when I was "on-camera-talent. When you are feeling downtrodden or believe life isn't treating you fairly, I hope you'll remember what the subject of this video did with his life. When you are feeling downtrodden or believe life isn't treating you fairly, I hope you'll remember what the subject of this video did with his life From my PM Magazine days when I was "on-camera-talent

Find nearly any book by Frederick Nolan (page 3). Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers.

Find nearly any book by Frederick Nolan (page 3). Mittenwald Syndicate. ISBN 9780722164273 (978-0-7221-6427-3) Softcover, Sphere, 1977. Armes : Investigator. AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Armes, Investigator: The World's Most Successful Private Eye (1976; by Frederick Nolan and Jay. J. Armes). ARMES (1993 Tri-Star) Unsold pilot Supposedly outlandish as hell The Investigators For over thirty-five year, Jay . rmes' El Paso-based team of "international investigaors" have provided state-of-the-art investigative services to clients from around the world, offering a full staff of professional, highly trained and certified investigators and specializing in "high-risk, high-profile cases.

book
  • Daigami
This guy was the real deal. The book is episodic -- short tales of his true life adventures -- but very entertaining and absolutely mind-blowing that he was/is a real guy and really did all this stuff. Definitely worth the read.
  • Foxanayn
Best worst book I've ever read. Arrived promptly and as described.
  • Terr
The amazing true story of Jay J. Armes, the private ibnvestigator who, ironically, lost his
hands in an explosion when he was a kid. He made up for the loss like gangbusters with a
high-tech, extremely physical lifestyle, right up there in Chuck Norris territory. I first read
this book back in the day after seeing Armes portraying an assassin targeting Steve McGarret
on Hawaii Five-Oh. One thing I recall from my first reading was how Armes creatively advertised
an agency competing with a dozen others in El Paso on radio, offering to find burglars and other
crooks which overtaxed police treated in a perfuntory fashion. Anyone who has been a victim
realizes that catching the perpetrator is worth any cost, something police can't do.

The book is filled with accounts of Armes' activities, including the rescue of Marlon Brando's
kidnapped son from Baja California.

Nolan inserts bridge notes between most chapters discussing Armes' daily schedule which
starts with 400 pushups straight out of bed, an hour of physical training, and an hour on his
in-home shooting range. He also discusses gadgets, such as the cosmetic human arms that
Armes can slip on so he can blend with others when on surveillance and the built-in gun
in one arm. There's a description of Armes' square block homesite, complete with private
zoo, the story of his involvement with the Patty Hearst kidnapping, and even ElPaso's
violent past.

The Armes philosophy is simple: solve the case fast so you can get on with the next job
and earn more money.

According to Wikipedia, Armes appears these days to have switched his market to domestic
government and foreign cases.

Great book, very inspiring. If you come across it, pick it up.
  • sobolica
The amazing true story of Jay J. Armes, the private ibnvestigator who, ironically, lost his
hands in an explosion when he was a kid. He made up for the loss like gangbusters with a
high-tech, extremely physical lifestyle, right up there in Chuck Norris territory. I first read
this book back in the day after seeing Armes portraying an assassin targeting Steve McGarret
on Hawaii Five-Oh. One thing I recall from my first reading was how Armes creatively advertised
an agency competing with a dozen others in El Paso on radio, offering to find burglars and other
crooks which overtaxed police treated in a perfuntory fashion. Anyone who has been a victim
realizes that catching the perpetrator is worth any cost, something police can't do.

The book is filled with accounts of Armes' activities, including the rescue of Marlon Brando's
kidnapped son from Baja California.

Nolan inserts bridge notes between most chapters discussing Armes' daily schedule which
starts with 400 pushups straight out of bed, an hour of physical training, and an hour on his
in-home shooting range. He also discusses gadgets, such as the cosmetic human arms that
Armes can slip on so he can blend with others when on surveillance and the built-in gun
in one arm. There's a description of Armes' square block homesite, complete with private
zoo, the story of his involvement with the Patty Hearst kidnapping, and even ElPaso's
violent past.

The Armes philosophy is simple: solve the case fast so you can get on with the next job
and earn more money.

According to Wikipedia, Armes appears these days to have switched his market to domestic
government and foreign cases.

Great book, very inspiring. If you come across it, pick it up.
  • Qusicam
The amazing true story of Jay J. Armes, the private ibnvestigator who, ironically, lost his
hands in an explosion when he was a kid. He made up for the loss like gangbusters with a
high-tech, extremely physical lifestyle, right up there in Chuck Norris territory. I first read
this book back in the day after seeing Armes portraying an assassin targeting Steve McGarret
on Hawaii Five-Oh. One thing I recall from my first reading was how Armes creatively advertised
an agency competing with a dozen others in El Paso on radio, offering to find burglars and other
crooks which overtaxed police treated in a perfuntory fashion. Anyone who has been a victim
realizes that catching the perpetrator is worth any cost, something police can't do.

The book is filled with accounts of Armes' activities, including the rescue of Marlon Brando's
kidnapped son from Baja California.

Nolan inserts bridge notes between most chapters discussing Armes' daily schedule which
starts with 400 pushups straight out of bed, an hour of physical training, and an hour on his
in-home shooting range. He also discusses gadgets, such as the cosmetic human arms that
Armes can slip on so he can blend with others when on surveillance and the built-in gun
in one arm. There's a description of Armes' square block homesite, complete with private
zoo, the story of his involvement with the Patty Hearst kidnapping, and even ElPaso's
violent past.

The Armes philosophy is simple: solve the case fast so you can get on with the next job
and earn more money.

According to Wikipedia, Armes appears these days to have switched his market to domestic
government and foreign cases.

Great book, very inspiring. If you come across it, pick it up.