almediah.fr
» » Meatless Days

Download Meatless Days eBook

by Sara Suleri

Download Meatless Days eBook
ISBN:
0006543898
Author:
Sara Suleri
Language:
English
Publisher:
Flamingo / HarperCollins; New Ed edition (1991)
Pages:
192 pages
EPUB book:
1860 kb
FB2 book:
1385 kb
DJVU:
1631 kb
Other formats
mbr azw rtf lrf
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
815


Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem.

In her autobiography, Meatless Days, Sara Suleri brings the reader right into her family’s life in Pakistan from two intertwined perspectives. At times she has the eye of a child growing up in Pakistan, at other times she speaks from the more distanced eye of an adult living in the United States. She begins with her adult view which helps ease the reader into her story because it is a perspective closer to our own. Later she moves into descriptions of life in Pakistan with her siblings and grandmother told from a child’s point of view.

I spent an entire week on Meatless Days, having picked it up after reading one of the book's chapters in an anthology of Indian writing. Do note that it wasn't part of any required reading list, so I wasn't forced to complete it, nothing like that. Calling it her memoirs might not be completely accurate, because Ms Suleri has stated that not everything in the book actually happened, ie she did make up some of the events.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on December 12, 2013.

' Some of the more heart-shaking writing about love and grief I've ever read' Kamila Shamsie, from th.

Sara's Clothes - Online Seller. Help the Poor & needy childrens.

Suleri has written Meatless Days almost entirely in the past tense, a style . So ends the first chapter of Meatless Days. What does Sulari mean by this statement?

Suleri has written Meatless Days almost entirely in the past tense, a style that somehow limits the reader's, especially a female reader's, "conversation" with this work; Suleri writes, by way of introduction to her stories (reminiscences), "My audience is lost, and angry to be lost, and both of us must find some token of exchange for this failed conversation. What is the significance of names to Sara Suleri? Does the Western reader understand the implications of each name? So ends the first chapter of Meatless Days. What does Sulari mean by this statement?. How much of her work is autobiography and how much of it is fiction?

Suleri approaches these several lives-and her own, as a darker sister-by theme rather than chronology, imaginatively moving from childhood impressions ("My aunts smell like my mother") to dreams to adult perceptions-a bounty of phrases, images, metaphors. And as she travels to England (as a child) and Yale (where she now teaches Third World literature), she never loses her power to astonish.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Meatless Days by Sara Suleri (1991, Paperback .

In this finely wrought memoir of life in postcolonial Pakistan, Suleri intertwines the violent history of Pakistan's independence with her own most intimate memoriesof her Welsh mother; of her Pakistani father, prominent political journalist . Suleri; of her tenacious grandmother Dadi and five siblings; and of her own passage to the West. Nine autobiographical tales that move easily back and forth among Pakistan, Britain, and the United States.

Sara Suleri s Meatless Days, recognized now as a classic of postcolonial literature is a finely wrought memoir of life in postcolonial Pakistan that intertwines the violent history of Pakistan s independence with her own most.

Sara Suleri s Meatless Days, recognized now as a classic of postcolonial literature is a finely wrought memoir of life in postcolonial Pakistan that intertwines the violent history of Pakistan s independence with her own most intimate memories - of her Welsh mother; of her Pakistani father, prominent political journalist Z A Suleri; of her tenacious grandmother Dadi and five siblings; and of he. Sara Suleri (1953 - ) is an academic, critic and author. She grew up in Lahore and earned degrees from Kinnaird College and University of the Punjab, and later a doctorate from Indiana University. She is a Professor Emeritus at Yale University and lives in the USA.

  • Kekinos
Enjoyed the juxtaposition of family life and national political scene.
  • Vivados
Sara Suleri's command on the English language is of course quite clear from the first page. She is among the few contemporary writers who dare to use difficult words without feeling apologetic about looking 'prententious." Bravo! Of course the words are used very appropriately as well. We need a revival of good English usage -- after all what's the point of testing kids on SATs.
Among South Asian writers she is a rare breed to balance a love for their homeland with candid criticism (unlike the much too celebrated Rushdie or Roy). She is an intellectual in the highest tradiation -- it is no wonder that a University Press published this book instead of some market-frenzied publishing house.
I disagree with some of her irreverent portrayal of Muslim society and traditional values but that is all tempered by the sardonic cadence of the work.
Hope you will write a novel as well.
  • Mr_Jeйson
I looked briefly at the one-star reviews of this book, and for a moment wondered if they had read a different book. This book was wonderful. I read it at the end of a several-month visit to India, while I was in Calcutta. Having read and written (in university and during my visit) about other contemporary authors dealing with the subcontinent's history and weaving it together with their personal histories in novels, essays, and other works--Rushdie, Seth, Desai, etc.--I still found Suleri utterly original and provacative. One of these reviews uses the word 'incomprehensible'; Suleri's articulate and sometimes absolutely perfect sentences are much less deserving of the term than the review itself. Read it again--you missed something.
  • Dreladred
I spent an entire week on Meatless Days, having picked it up after reading one of the book's chapters in an anthology of Indian writing. As a teenager, I'd just like to share my views about the book. Do note that it wasn't part of any required reading list, so I wasn't forced to complete it, nothing like that.
Calling it her memoirs might not be completely accurate, because Ms Suleri has stated that not everything in the book actually happened, ie she did make up some of the events. However, she does insist that the language is a true reflection of the way in which she thinks, and speaks. If she is to believed, I think that makes her quite an extraordinary woman. Of all the Sub-Cont. writers whom I've read, no other writer quite matches up to the complexity of her language, and the intricacy with which she readily assembles metaphors for largely universal concepts such as 'the enigma of arrival' (to borrow a Naipaulian title) and gender in the Indian/Pakistani home.
Her writing is a joy to 'decode', and it really amazed me how she often drops hints of a certain image early in a chapter only to develop it beautifully many paragraphs later. I found myself intrigued by her style. This is a book that requires, and deserves utmost concentration in the reading. Missing out on a single conceit might render whole sentences incomprehensible to the less-attentive reader. I actually plan to re-read Meatless Days, just to enjoy it from the perspective of someone who has already made initial acquaintance. I do recommend re-reading it to most who've have the opportunity to finish this book once.
I also enjoyed Ms Suleri's fresh, and often satirical insights to such things as deaths, mourning, religion, and family. She certainly does put across her arguments very interestingly, and evocatively. There is a paragraph in which she cannot locate the graves of her mother and Ifat, and decides to leave the cemetery altogether, because she doesn't want to disrupt them from their restful peace. Not something that the reader might agree with, but the beauty of the book is that nothing is forced down the reader's throat. Ms Suleri certainly doesn't come across as someone who is philosophising at all.
Very highly recommended!
  • Vivaral
Ms Suleri perhaps falls victim to high expectations. Instead of trying to be her own self she wants to maintain B.Sidhwa's wit and Rushdie's somberness and guile in portrayal of her confused childhood.
The book while appealing to a westerner wishing to get a superficial insight into a Pakistani family, is a complete waste of time for someone who has had even a slight exposure to sub continent litreature
  • MEGA FREEDY
Here is a book written with much candor, about a time and place most consider best left untouched. Suleri fills page after page with the heart-rending nostalgia of an immigrant who has gone, but has never forgotten. Her childhood, her innermost tormented thoughts, her journey across bonds and across continents - yes, even poor old Daadi - all are things that drive home the eloquence and the wit of her carefully crafted memoir.
Not only is Meatless Days a gem in the miniscule canon of Pakistani literature in English, it is a treat for readers of the postcolonial experience the world over. It is highly recommended.
  • Gldasiy
This memoir is simply gorgeous. Suleri's utterly intoxicating account of growing up in Pakistan is one of the best examples of post colonial literature. Meatless Days captures the dizzying complexities self, family and nation in prose that is as lovely as it is heartbreaking.
An evocative and moving memoir that was sometimes painful but ultimately very rewarding to read. Absolutely one of the best books I've ever read.