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Download Stravinsky - The Second Exile: France and America 1934-1971 (v. 2) eBook

by Stephen Walsh

Download Stravinsky - The Second Exile: France and America 1934-1971 (v. 2) eBook
ISBN:
0224060783
Author:
Stephen Walsh
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jonathan Cape; 1st edition (July 1, 2006)
Pages:
736 pages
EPUB book:
1171 kb
FB2 book:
1214 kb
DJVU:
1764 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
455


Stravinsky: The Second Exile follows him through the remainder of his long life, which he would spend .

Stravinsky: The Second Exile follows him through the remainder of his long life, which he would spend largely in the United States. These are the years during which he would compose such masterworks as The Rake's Progress and Symphony in C, and achieve a new level of fame as a conductor and concert pianist in his own right. In this second and final volume of Stephen Walsh's acclaimed biography, the author traces and illuminates Stravinsky's increasingly complex and often agonised family life and his crucially important relationship with his associate Robert Craft.

This second volume takes up the composer's story in 1934.

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This, the second and final volume of Stephen Walsh’s magisterial biography of Igor Stravinsky, begins in 1934, when Stravinsky is fifty-two and living in France. Already regarded by many as the most important composer of his generation, Stravinsky is nevertheless at this point a fairly unhappy expatriate, all too aware of the war clouds beginning to gather.

Walsh, Stephen (2008). Stravinsky: The Second Exile: France and America, 1934-1971. Snippet view on Google books at books. Kuster, Andrew, Analysis of The Flood. Berkeley: University of California Press. p. 459. ISBN 9780520256156. Boosey & Hawkes' information about the score. Retrieved August 16, 2007. Retrieved 5 May 2009.

This, the second and final volume of Stephen Walsh's m. ibRing - система поиска книг в интернет-магазинах.

This second volume takes up the composer's story in 1934, in a Europe grow. This, the second and final volume of Stephen Walsh's m.

This second volume takes up the composer's story in 1934, in a Europe growing ever more chaotic in the lead-up to World War II. Walsh follows Stravinsky's emigration to the United States, where he courted Hollywood, associated with writers and artists including Aldous Huxley, .

item 3 Stravinsky (Volume 2): The Second Exile - France and America, 19. .Horror Paperback Books Stephen King.Stephen Walsh is a critic and musicologist who has written and broadcast extensively on Stravinsky and many other aspects of twentieth-century music. He was for some years a music critic with the Observer and The Times, and now writes for the Independent. The widely praised first volume of the present biography, Stravinsky: A Creative Spring, won the Royal Philharmonic Society prize for best music book of the year 2000.

Items related to Stravinsky: The Second Exile: France and America . He is the author of a number of books on composers ranging from Schumann to Bartók.

Items related to Stravinsky: The Second Exile: France and America, 1934-1971. Stephen Walsh Stravinsky: The Second Exile: France and America, 1934-1971. ISBN 13: 9780375407529. This, the second and final volume of Stephen Walsh’s magisterial biography of Igor Stravinsky, begins in 1934, when Stravinsky is fifty-two and living in France.

  • Golkree
I just started the book but I am already very involved. I have read the Robert Craft books as well and this add another point of view to the life of Stravinsky. I started with this book which chronicles the second half to the Maestro's life as I seem to be more interest in that. I saw Stravinsky conduct at the Hollywood Bowl when I was young and was so interested in him that I drove up the Sunset Strip to see where he lived on Weatherly Drive. I have loved his music (and not just the well known works) all my life and have no intention of ever stopping studying his works.
  • Molotok
An amazing vision of Igor Stravinsky's like and work.
  • Vijora
unless Mr. Walsh prefers 'musicologist' to 'biographer'. When I finished volume II, I immediately went and bought volume I. I rated the book 5 stars but wish I could give it 6. As a retired music librarian, I am cautious in following the hype about any new book on music/musicians/musicology that is making the rounds and more often than not, while the reviews may be accurate, regrettably, there are times they're not accurate enough. I think Mr. Walsh's two volumes are stunning. I think they are so good that once started, one wants to do nothing but sit and read them.

The period and the musical life out of which Stravinsky emerged is not unknown to me and I think the deepest connection I developed with Stravinsky's music was when I played in a performance of Symphony of Psalms. Whether or not I walked away humming portions of it (which is unlikely since I cannot sing), the music has left, to use a trite phrase, an indelible mark on both my musical and cultural psyche, but so has the personality of Stravinsky himself. And Mr. Walsh does an incredibly job of making him breathe. It isn't just Stravinsky who breathes in the course of reading this book (I haven't finished Volume I) but the words and the events and the people take on a life that is far more than facts as accurate as they might be.

I cannot recommend these two volumes highly enough and I only wish it was possible for Mr. Walsh to write a third.
  • Fordregelv
I normally HATE this type of bio. Most composers lead pretty dull lives. If you were to make a truthful movie of one, you'd have long stretches of Our Hero scratching on a piece of paper. In other words, it's not the life itself that's interesting, but the work that life produced. Of course Stravinsky's life lacks the excitement of Rite of Spring or Oedipus Rex or Agon. I can't think of any life that measures up. But Stravinsky was a more interesting personality than most, especially in light of the music he produced and the contradictory things he said about it. Without quite uncovering the mystery of genius, Walsh nevertheless manages to keep our attention and build suspense, mostly through explicating the course of the composer's life and offering shrewd guesses into the composer's character. I happen to love almost everything Stravinsky wrote, so naturally I'm interested in the man. However, Stravinsky's family and personal relations are so tangled that I'm confident this book would appeal to those who can leave the work alone. Even so, Walsh provides valuable "bird's-eye" insights into several major scores.

A fine historian, Walsh scrupulously separates fact from the notoriously wishful thinking of Craft's accounts. Of course, Craft becomes the second major player in the narrative. Walsh isn't interested in bashing Craft and in several places vigorously defends him against the charges of careerism and Svengali-ism. On the other hand, he doesn't overlook Craft's flaws. Walsh tends to see neither gods nor demons, but people. He also has the gift of tying often-mundane facts into a compelling story and of bright, elegant prose. I can't praise this book (and its predecessor) highly enough.
  • CrazyDemon
Following up the wonderful first volume of his biography of Stravinsky, Cardiff University musicologist Stephen Walsh gives us a second and final volume that begins in 1934 and ends with Stravinsky's death in 1971. This takes us through the unsettled 1930s, his emigration to America and then the final years with his conversion to ultra-modern techniques. It would appear that Walsh has read and digested everything written about the composer during the times in question, and he has interviewed many people who knew and worked with him. At times the narrative is weighted down by 'and then he conducted X in Y' but his always graceful, indeed beautiful, prose makes even those laundry list sections interesting reading. There is some attention paid to the ins and outs of the works themselves but this does not pretend to be an analysis of Stravinsky's oeuvre; Walsh has already written such a book, the exceedingly valuable 'The Music of Stravinsky.'

There is, of course, a good deal of mention of that most important of late Stravinsky associates, Robert Craft, who has himself written extensively about the composer. There are some disagreements with Craft's published statements, but less than one might imagine and it is done with evenhandedness and tact. Nonetheless, he indicates that Craft's personal involvement with Stravinsky led to some imprecision in his observations and assessments.

For those who have read the earlier volume this is a must-have. For those who are tempted to get this volume without having read the earlier one, I'd suggest some caution. In the present volume there are many references to incidents and people whose importance is unexplained and which can only be gleaned from having first read the earlier volume, 'A Creative Spring.' But taken together these two volumes are indispensable for anyone wanting to understand Stravinsky the man.

Scott Morrison