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by Amy Silverstein

Download Sick Girl eBook
ISBN:
0802118542
Author:
Amy Silverstein
Category:
Professionals & Academics
Language:
English
Publisher:
Grove Press; First edition. edition (September 10, 2007)
Pages:
304 pages
EPUB book:
1558 kb
FB2 book:
1690 kb
DJVU:
1822 kb
Other formats
lrf docx rtf lit
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
202


FREE shipping on qualifying offers. The hardcover publication of Sick Girl garnered tremendous attention, generated impressive sales.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers.

After a lymphoma scare, Silverstein decides that she has had enough and she wants to stop taking all her meds, which have terrible side effects. This will, effectively, cause her to die.

Amy’s shocking honesty and irreverent humor allow the reader to live her nightmare from the inside-an unforgettable experience that is both painfully disturbing and utterly . Sick Girl - Amy Silverstein.

Amy’s shocking honesty and irreverent humor allow the reader to live her nightmare from the inside-an unforgettable experience that is both painfully disturbing and utterly compelling. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Publisher: Open Road Integrated MediaReleased: Oct 13, 2008ISBN: 9781555848767Format: book. carousel previous carousel next.

Author: Silverstein, Amy Publisher: Grove Press. Condition: New! Binding: Hardcover Publish date: 2007. Few of us undergo a heart transplant at twenty-four, but we can recognize our own stories in this incisive, unflinching look at life, love, and extraordinary courage. "Amy Silverstein is not an easy patient, with good reason. She has lived nineteen long years with a transplanted heart, much longer than any doctor could have predicted. And she has, arguably, done more with a transplanted heart than anyone else, including the publication of this remarkable book.

The hardcover publication of Sick Girl garnered tremendous attention, generated impressive sales, and ignited controversy. Both inspiring and provocative, reactions to the book ranged from inflammatory posts on a . Amy’s force, candor, and her refusal to be the thankful patient from whom we expect undiluted gratitude for the medical treatments that have extended her life, have put her at the center of a debate on patient rights and the omnipotent power of doctors

The hardcover publication of Sick Girl garnered tremendous attention, generated impressive sales, and ignited controversy. The hardcover publication of Sick Girl garnered tremendous attention, generated impressive sales, and ignited controversy.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on February 6, 2013.

The Amy he would come to love deeply was not the same Amy that Jill had grown up with. Scott hadn’t had enough time to memorize the contours of my true unburdened self and my smiling face before my illness, but Jill had witnessed them for many years: the second-grade photo, the fourth, the sixth, the junior high musical, the high school basketball game. Holding on to these images, Jill still remembered the healthy Amy she once knew. All my other friends-and even my husband-would never know what they had missed.

At just twenty-four, Amy Silverstein was your typical type-A law student: smart, driven, and highly competitive. With a budding romance and a heavy academic schedule, Silverstein did not have time for illness-even one that caused her to black out and suffer temporary blindness.

Posts from Amy Silverstein: Author, speaker, advocate for women's health and wellness. For me, working on a new book means having the courage to respond to what kicks inside me until I put it on the page-otherwise, why write? youtube. So, you want to be a writer? -

Posts from Amy Silverstein: Author, speaker, advocate for women's health and wellness. So, you want to be a writer? - - Charles Bukowski. Visual" project for a Beat literature class.

“[With] humor and radiant courage . . . Silverstein delivers a searing insight into the battle to stay alive.”—Ted Koppel“Spectacular.”—Mehmet Oz, MD, cardiothoracic surgeon and coauthor of You: The Owner’s Manual At just twenty-four, Amy Silverstein was your typical type-A law student: smart, driven, and highly competitive. With a budding romance and a heavy academic schedule, Silverstein did not have time for illness—even one that caused her to black out and suffer temporary blindness. When her family doctor suggested her symptoms were due to stress and diet, she was happy to think calm thoughts and eat fistfuls of salt. At such a young age, how could she have guessed that her heart was about to give out? With a grace and force reminiscent of Lucy Grealy’s Autobiography of a Face or Susanna Kaysen’s Girl, Interrupted , Silverstein chronicles her harrowing medical journey from first misdiagnosis to astonishing and ongoing recovery, all amidst a romantic bedside courtship with her husband, Scott, and her uncompromising drive to become a mother. Silverstein presents a patient’s perspective that is fierce, provocative, and sometimes controversial, allowing readers to live her nightmare from the inside—an unforgettable experience that is both painfully disturbing and utterly compelling.
  • Kagaramar
What a wonderful book and I'm so glad I found it.
I have congestive heart failure and my doctor is suggesting getting a heart transplant.
I was searching the web for both the good and the bad of heart transplantation.
All I could find was the good stories. It seemed like all the information out there from various hospitals and their paid shills was only promoting transplantation. Then I found Amy's book and read it. I got the real cold hard truth of what it's like to live day to day post transplant.
I now am of the persuasion that I don't want to go through with it. Quality of life is just as important as life itself.
It amazes me reading all the posts from people who say she's on a pity-party or ungrateful or what have you.
These people are PERPETUATING THE PROBLEM of having to put on a smiley face all the time when living with a terrible illness.
It's perfectly human and OK to tell it like it is.
Kudos to Amy for being the brave soul that she is.
Unfortunately, there are two sides to every story, and some people only want to hear the happy side.
  • iSlate
After reading so many of the reviews who knocked Amy for being ungrateful, I think you missed the point.

She states from the outset that she's not the grateful patient so many people think she should be.

People who have been fortunate to not have to deal with major health care issues DON'T know what it's like...Amy writes a personally revealing book and not only expresses her anger and frustration...she also illustrates why...
...people get frustrated with their doctors (docs and health care professionals assume patients know a lot more than they do...and, for the most part, aren't getting paid to educate patients -- unfortunately!

What's particularly illustrative was toward the later part of the book where she starts talking about doctors "punting"...what she doesn't address, and which is particularly germaine in our costly health care system is just how much each of these specialists are getting paid to NOT KNOW. It's also surprising there isn't more cross-specialist consultation going on...which would ease the patient frustration as well as reduce unnecessary health care expenditures...

What's clear is, Amy comes from an upper middle class (at the very least) family and background...there's no mention of the actual costs of her health care (either what's paid by insurance, or what's not covered)...which suggests she's been most fortunate in that health care concern...

...if she'd have that concern in addition, she would likely have been at least twice as angry.

As a former health care practitioner, and one very concerned about the ongoing healthcare debates in the U.S., I found this an excellent addition to the volumes of "patient" literature -- helpful for health care practitioners in having a better understanding why their patients may not be ebullient fountains fo gratitude.
  • ChallengeMine
With awe at your courage and strength and searing honesty.

With waves of emotion as I gulped your words. I couldn't read fast enough.

With a jarring sense of deja vu because I've walked this journey with my soul friend. She became sick at your exact age, suddenly and violently with one cough, while we were at work.

She was totally disabled and bedridden for two years while waiting and waiting and waiting.

In 1993, she became the 41st double lung transplant recipient at Stanford. And became a spokesperson for TRIO.

The immunosuppressants destroyed her kidneys, and she left us exactly 10 years to the day of her transplant.

Thank you for your beautifully written book. You touched my heart.
  • Cordaron
An amazing story; I was absolutely fascinated and obsessed with her and had to Google her and see all her interviews. She was brutally frank and honest, and she was somewhat of a pill especially in the beginning. That was probably due at least in part to her mother's alcoholism. The fact that she has done as well as she has, from such rocky beginnings, is pretty amazing. I can't wait to read her next book! Kudos to her for taking such good care of herself, and for finding something to do (writing) to give her a reason to live when she felt that she just couldn't go on . Also kudos to her husband, who put up with a lot of crap from her! She did not mince words in describing it all, and that's what made it so interesting.
  • Silly Dog
I have read several one-star reviews before I finished reading this book on my own. Somewhere in the middle of my read, I emphasized with the anger one-star reviewers expressed. But then anger would wash away leaving only respect for author’s disciplined honesty. As a great writer, Amy did not editorialize her own thoughts and feelings during specific stages of her life and her illness. She reports dryly and honestly. There are no excuses or apologies for her feelings. There are no praises either. She didn’t try to make herself look better. She just opened up her heart and her mind to us for judgment with hopes that we would learn something instead. Is she a very likable character? No. Is she captivating? Yes! Not trusting doctors and not liking the limitations of the medical profession is so common and normal. Being at their mercy and fighting for the power to control one’s life in a body that doesn’t listen to you is infuriating and isolating. There is nothing revolutionary in what Amy report. She is not more shellfish than the rest of us. She is more honest. And for that her story deserves my respect.
  • Aria
I really liked Sick Girl by Amy Silverstein. Silverstein did an excellent job of explaining her health issues in a way that was easy to understand & follow. I learned a lot about being a person with a transplanted organ, the implications of the medicines that must be taken and the toll it takes on a person.

I would highly recommend this book to readers who like: memoirs, stories about health issues, the desire to learn more about being a person with a transplanted organ and well written books.