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Download My Khyber Marriage (Adventure Travel Classics) eBook

by Morag Murray Abdullah

Download My Khyber Marriage (Adventure Travel Classics) eBook
ISBN:
1590480872
Author:
Morag Murray Abdullah
Category:
Specific Groups
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Long Riders' Guild Press (October 1, 2001)
Pages:
292 pages
EPUB book:
1801 kb
FB2 book:
1967 kb
DJVU:
1397 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.7
Votes:
143


Morag and Ikbal's marriage edured for more than forty years, until her death suddenly of cancer in 1960. Here then, in another work, two generations later, I find the end of this love story begun in My Khyber Marriage. Teachers/Librarians: 7th to 12th grades - Social Studies

Morag and Ikbal's marriage edured for more than forty years, until her death suddenly of cancer in 1960. My grandfather could hardly contain his grief. He vowed that he would not return to any place they had been together, or look at anything that would remind him of his beloved wife. Morocco was a country where they had never traveled. Teachers/Librarians: 7th to 12th grades - Social Studies. This work of authenticity by an insider will hold students' interest.

My Khyber Marriage book. This is a very enjoyable book written about Morag Murray Abdullah's unique experience as a chieftan's wife in the hills of Afghanistan right after WWI. Some of the stories are quite captivating and Morag and her sisters in law are presented as admirable and fearless figures. There are some very romantic chapters as well. Too b I learned that Hindus were once forced to eat ground up statues of Hindu deities by a Muslim ruler. I also learned that Pathan women were brave defenders of hill top forts.

Morag Murray Abdullah. My Khyber Marriage (Adventure Travel Classics) Close. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove My Khyber Marriage (Adventure Travel Classics) from your list? My Khyber Marriage (Adventure Travel Classics). by Morag Murray Abdullah. Published October 1, 2001 by The Long Riders' Guild Press.

Murray's Travel Adventures, Erina, New South Wales, Australia.

My Khyber Marriage: Experiences of a Scotswoman as the Wife of a Pathan Chieftain's Son. Morag Abdullah. Lord of the Khyber: The Story of the North-West Frontier. Fifty Great American Silent Films 1912-1920, A Pictoral Survey. In 1835 the English Lord Chancellor Lyndhurst introduced into the House of Lords a bill to correct an ambiguity in the law concerning marriages within prohibited degrees. The existing law, based on the 1533 Henrican statute fixing the degrees of consanguinity and affinity, specified that marriages within prohibited degrees could be annulled at any time within the lifetime of both spouses by the Ecclesiastical Court.

Saira Elizabeth Luiza Shah (née Elizabeth Louise MacKenzie; 1900 – 15 August 1960) was a Scottish writer who wrote under the pen name Morag Murray Abdullah. She met the Afghan author, poet, diplomat, scholar, and savant Sirdar Ikbal Ali Shah and wrote about her marriage to this chieftain's son and her travels in the North-West Frontier Province of British India and the mountains of Afghanistan.

Items related to My Khyber Marriage: Experiences of a Scotswoman a. .1. My Khyber Marriage. Morag Murray Abdullah.She describes her adventures in exquisite detail: the luxurious spa-like treatment in preparation for her marriage; a fairy-tale wedding with thousands of gift-bearing guests spread out for miles in a city of tents; defending a fort with her sisters-in-law during a raid by a rival tribe. Murray leaves the reader sharing her deep affection forher husband's country, its people and culture.

BIOGRAPHY My Khyber Marriage MORAG MURRAY ABDULLAH. Like the authors other two dozen books, it is regarded as a classic. My Life From Brigand to King The Autobiography of Amir Habibullah. 165 PAGES Fifty years of travel and adventure, of writing and teaching, are spanned in this selection by the prominent Afghan author Sirdar Ikbal Ali Shah. The whole flavour of the East is here: Hajis rub shoulders with Bolsheviks; Sultans with Sufis; Colonial Officers with alchemists. The Golden Caravan will take you to Turkestan, and to Egypt, to the Himalayas and the Khyber Pass.

In this new age of twenty-first century problems and concerns, perhaps we can take comfort in the life of a remarkably brave woman? Her name was Morag Murray Abdullah, and sadly, though her story has been forgotten, the resonating echoes of her life still ring as true now as they did back in the 1920s when she wrote her amazing autobiography. In 1916 Morag was leading what can only be termed as a conventional life. The First World War was raging in nearby Europe. But the city of Edinburgh, Scotland, where she lived, was quiet and safe. In fact everything about her life, up till this point, had been predictable. Then she met Syed Abdullah. The handsome student was attending university there in Scotland, but his roots were far away. Abdullah's father was a chief of the Pathan tribe, those legendary tribesmen who ruled the lands around the fabled Khyber Pass in distant India. Regardless of these vast cultural and religious, (she was Protestant - he a Muslim), the two young people fell in love and were married. Nothing in Morag's life was ever the same. She followed her new husband out to the war-filled, North West Frontier Province of India. There she took up residence among one of the most martial races on Earth. For the next two decades the former Scottish lass became a witness to blood feuds, ruthless tribal politics, and the seclusion of her fellow women in one of the most remote and dangerous portion of the world. Yet this is in no way a tale of exploitation, rather it is the true story of two people from vastly different countries, religions, and families, who learned to live and love each other despite all the odds.
  • TheFresh
I read this work years ago, when it was published by Octagon Press in 1990. In this remarkable autobiography with great appeal, Morag Murray describes how during World War I she fell in love with the son of an Afghan chieftain, married him and left her safe middle-class life in Scotland to travel to the distant stronghold of her husband's family.

Stories of her adaptation give intriguing insight into the lives of these Muslim people - their culture, lives and code of honor - dispelling some of the Western myths of harems, brigands, and Muslim women. Murray's openness, curiosity, and zest for life are inspirational, and she describes her adventures in exquisite detail: the luxurious spa-like treatment in preparation for her marriage; a fairytale wedding with thousands of gift-bearing guests spread out for miles in a city of tents; defending a fort with her sisters-in-law during a raid by a rival tribe.

Imagine this reviewers surprise, now years later, when reading a work by Tahir Shah, The Caliph's House: A Year in Casablanca, when pieces begin to fall together. Tahir Shah is Morag Murray's grandson and a portion of his story in this work is retracing his grandfather's last years spent in Tangier. The grandfather (a young warrior in Murray's autobiography) Shah writes about: ". . raised in a tribal fiefdom in the Hindu Kush. As is traditional in our family, he was encouraged to master many fields of study, to live many lives in one. He was a medical doctor and a diplomat, a professor of philosophy, and expert on folklore, mysticism, and political science. He was an adviser and confidant to half a dozen heads of state, and the author of more than sixty books - on poety, politics, biography, literature, religion, and travel."

Morag and Ikbal's marriage edured for more than forty years, until her death suddenly of cancer in 1960. "My grandfather could hardly contain his grief. He vowed that he would not return to any place they had been together, or look at anything that would remind him of his beloved wife. . . Morocco was a country where they had never traveled. My grandfather had heard of the kingdom's mountains, its kasbahs, and the proud tribal traditions. The sound of such a place was alluring. So that summer, he packed his sea trunk with some books and a few clothes and set sail for Tangier. . . and a life waiting to be reunited with (her)."

Here then, in another work, two generations later, I find the end of this love story begun in My Khyber Marriage.

Teachers/Librarians: 7th to 12th grades - Social Studies. This work of authenticity by an insider will hold students' interest. And could be more timely, since the US is in a war in this mountainous area of Afghanistan, among the very Pathan people of whom she shares her life.
  • Cenneel
A fascinating look at another time and place, through a lens that is of another time and place itself.