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Download Woman Warrior, the (Picador Books) eBook

by Maxine Hong Kingston

Download Woman Warrior, the (Picador Books) eBook
ISBN:
0330264001
Author:
Maxine Hong Kingston
Category:
Specific Groups
Language:
English
Publisher:
Picador (1977)
Pages:
186 pages
EPUB book:
1877 kb
FB2 book:
1425 kb
DJVU:
1978 kb
Other formats
rtf doc txt mobi
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
590


Электронная книга "The Woman Warrior: Picador Classic", Maxine Hong Kingston.

Электронная книга "The Woman Warrior: Picador Classic", Maxine Hong Kingston. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Woman Warrior: Picador Classic" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Maxine Hong Kingston is the author of WOMAN WARRIOR and CHINA MEN. This site is maintained by th. .The young Kingston lives in two worlds: the America to which her parents have emigrated, a place inhabited by white ghosts, and the China of her mother’s talk stories, a place haunted by the ghosts of the past.

This was required reading in my literature class. I had difficulty finishing the book. It just did not keep my interest. Good literature engages the reader, regardless of that reader’s interests.

Throughout her childhood, Maxine Hong Kingston listened to her mother's mesmerizing tales of a China where girls are worthless, tradition is exalted and only a strong, wily woman can scratch her way upwards. Growing up in a changing America, surrounded by Chinese myth and memory, this is her story of two cultures and one trenchant, lyrical journey into womanhood. Complex and beautiful, angry and adoring, Maxine Hong Kingston's The Woman Warrior is a seminal piece of writing about emigration and identity.

Maxine Hong Kingston is Senior Lecturer for Creative Writing at the University of California, Berkeley. For her memoirs and fiction, The Fifth Book of Peace, The Woman Warrior, China Men, Tripmaster Monkey, and Hawai’i One Summer, Kingston has earned numerous awards, among them the National Book Award, the National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction, the PEN West Award for Fiction, an American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters Literature Award, and a National Humanities Medal.

So begins Maxine Hong Kingston: The Woman Warrior: Memoirs of a Girlhood Among Ghosts. Books with family secrets intrigue me and I remained engaged in Kingston's mix of myth, memoir and perspectives on growing up and the immigrant experience throughout. Kingston writes with poignancy and beauty You must not tell anyone, what I am about to tell you. So begins Maxine Hong Kingston: The Woman Warrior: Memoirs of a Girlhood Among.

ALSO BY MAXINE HONG KINGSTON China Men Tripmaster Monkey Hawai’i One Summer The Fifth Book of Peace To Mother and Father Contents No Name Woman White Tigers Shaman At the Western Palace A Song for .

ALSO BY MAXINE HONG KINGSTON China Men Tripmaster Monkey Hawai’i One Summer The Fifth Book of Peace To Mother and Father Contents No Name Woman White Tigers Shaman At the Western Palace A Song for a Barbarian Reed Pipe No Name Woman You must not tell anyone, my mother said, what I am about to tell yo. All of them sent money home. I remember looking at your aunt one day when she and I were dressing; I had not noticed before that she had such a protruding melon of a stomach. But I did not think, ‘She’s pregnant,’ until she began to look like other pregnant women, her shirt pulling and the white tops of her black pants showing.

Maxine Hong Kingston (Chinese: 湯婷婷; born Maxine Ting Ting Hong; October 27, 1940) is a Chinese .

Maxine Hong Kingston (Chinese: 湯婷婷; born Maxine Ting Ting Hong; October 27, 1940) is a Chinese American author and Professor Emerita at the University of California, Berkeley, where she graduated with a BA in English in 1962. Kingston has written three novels and several works of non-fiction about the experiences of Chinese Americans. Among her works are The Woman Warrior (1976), awarded the National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction, and China Men (1980), awarded the National Book Award. She has written one novel, Tripmaster Monkey, a story depicting a character based on the mythical Chinese character Sun Wu Kong.

Maxine Hong Kingston. Maxine Hong Kingston. Wittman Ah Sing is an unstoppable hipster poet and playwright on the streets of San Francisco, after the Beats have left and before the hippies have arrived. He falls in love with Nancy the Beautiful, marries Tana, and chases his dream to write and stage an epic drama spanning America and China. Such is the spirit of this wonderful book-a sense of doors opening wide onto an American life of great purpose and joy, and the tonic wisdom of a writer we have come to cherish. A Chinese American woman tells of the Chinese myths, family stories and events of her California childhood that have shaped her identity.

'A brilliant memoir...it is about being Chinese in the way A Portrait of the Artist is about being Irish; it is an investigation of soul, not landscape, its sources are dream and memory, myth and desire; its crises are the crises of a heart in exile from roots that bind and terrorize it...Maxine Hong Kingston writes with bitter and relentless love. Her voice, now, is as clear as the voice of Ts'ai Yen, who sang her sad, angry songs of China to the barbarians. It is as fierce as a warrior's voice, and as eloquent as any artist's' Jane Kramer, New York Times Book Review 'This is a delightful book...tells more than i ever imagined about the strangeness of being Chinese and a woman; it also gives a superb account of what it's like simply to be alive' Victoria Radin, New Society 'A strange, enchanting book...As a manual of self- discovery through the channels and terrors of one's own rejected communal memory, it is unbeatable' Guardian 'As a dream - of the "female avenger" - it is dizzying, elemental a poem turned into a sword...reimagining the past with such dark beauty, such precision and anger that you feel you have saddled the Tao dragon and see all through the fiery eye of God' John Leonard, New York Times 'A book of fierce clarity and orginality' Newsweek
  • Marilbine
This collection of Chinese folklore is also a complex soul-searching journey for the author in which she delves into the folklore of her Chinese heritage that has been imparted to her over the years mainly by her mother and assesses how these tales relate to her own inner self in the way that she has been raised by her parents and also in the way that she has grown both within and apart from these cultural boundaries.

The stories themselves are fairly interesting and entertaining, but what really makes this book noteworthy is the introspection of the author as a Chines-American woman growing up within two separate cultures in the 1970's and the inner strength and courage that she develops throughout this growing-up process.

While it was a bit outside of my comfort zone at times, I really appreciated this book for the honesty and sincerity of the author and the courage that it took to put all of her internal feelings and thoughts out into the ope for all to see.
  • Nekora
This story carries you along so effortlessly, like listening to a favorite song, yet one that leaves you in a state of enchantment and with an ache for a society, a perspective that you don't know, and can't help to heal. It really portrays the ache of being split between cultures well.
  • Zeleence
I am delighted that a friend suggested that I read Kingston's book, as I'd not read it in college as had so many of my friends. It is a powerful, sobering, wonderful compilation of very powerful stories. I can imagine that this book made a dramatic impact on women and society when it was first published, as it has a lasting effect even now, several decades later. The stories of growing up in a very different time and culture, told with Kingston's strong, burning passion to bring life to these tales, ensures that they are beautifully and powerfully alive the page. The book is timeless.
  • adventure time
I stepped out of my normal reading patterns with this book and was surprised by how much I actually enjoyed it. Kingston paints very vivid images with her words and brings them to life off the page. I was not a fan of the fourth story, "At the Western Palace", but all the others were great. "White Tigers" was my favorite to read in this book.
  • anonymous
It is complicated, I'm not going to lie, but once you get into it it's worth it. It makes you see the sacrifices that immigrants have to make when they leave their country. It doesn't apply only to Chinese people, it is for immigrants from all around the world.
  • Umrdana
I loved the description of the culture and the gorgeous language. It was a true escape from the everyday world, but with highly artistic, skilled writing. No cheap thrills. Kingston's writing is enthralling.
  • Olwado
This book came in a timely manor and was a great read. The stories can be read separately and each carry their own meaning, but are still cohesive and all relate back to the main character. A great read.
This was required reading in my literature class. I had difficulty finishing the book. It just did not keep my interest. Good literature engages the reader, regardless of that reader’s interests. For example, Frank McCourt’s Angela’s Ashes was enjoyed by readers that were not of Irish ancestry and previously had no real interest in anything Irish. Arthur Golden’s Memoirs of a Geisha interested people who usually wouldn’t have been drawn to anything that had to do with Japan, or Japanese culture. Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is almost two-hundred years old and the themes are still relevant today and it allows the reader to further appreciate the cultural, popular mentality of the time, in England and Western Europe.

I was hoping that this book would do the same for Chinese Americans and Chinese culture. It did not. There are certain parts of the book that are very well written, but the imagery often goes a bit over the top and is frequently too heavy-handed. Imagery & symbolism should be somewhat subtle. There is also a bit of repetition of some of the themes, which is usually ok, if a motif is running throughout a book, but only if it is done with considerable intelligence and creativity. The repetitious motifs in this book often seem irritating and even inane.

Some parts are very well written, but those parts make up a small portion of the book: still, enough for me to give the book two stars.

Just wasn’t my cup of tea.