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Download Marmaduke Pickthall: British Muslim eBook

by Peter Clark

Download Marmaduke Pickthall: British Muslim eBook
ISBN:
0704325144
Author:
Peter Clark
Category:
Travelers & Explorers
Language:
English
Publisher:
Quartet Books Ltd (May 1, 1987)
Pages:
224 pages
EPUB book:
1990 kb
FB2 book:
1879 kb
DJVU:
1769 kb
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Rating:
4.7
Votes:
267


Muhammad Marmaduke Pickthall (born Marmaduke William Pickthall; 7 April 1875 – 19 May 1936) was a British Islamic scholar noted for his 1930 English translation of the Quran, called The Meaning of the Glorious Koran.

Muhammad Marmaduke Pickthall (born Marmaduke William Pickthall; 7 April 1875 – 19 May 1936) was a British Islamic scholar noted for his 1930 English translation of the Quran, called The Meaning of the Glorious Koran. A convert from Christianity, Pickthall was a novelist, esteemed by D. H. Lawrence, H. G. Wells, and E. M. Forster, as well as a journalist, headmaster, and political and religious leader

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Pickthall, says Peter Clark in his book Marmaduke Pickthall: British Muslim (London: Quartet, 1986), reverted to Islam at a time when Turkey had been defeated at the end of the First World War, and the collapse of the caliphate in Turkey

Pickthall, says Peter Clark in his book Marmaduke Pickthall: British Muslim (London: Quartet, 1986), reverted to Islam at a time when Turkey had been defeated at the end of the First World War, and the collapse of the caliphate in Turkey. In 1919, Pickthall worked for the London-based Islamic Information Bureau that among other things published the weekly Muslim Outlook that regularly reported on the Turkish defense of Anatolia.

Acknowledgements Foreword: Marmaduke Pickthall After 1936, PETER CLARK. 1. Introduction: Pickthall, Islam and the Modern World, GEOFFREY P. NASH. Part One: Pickthall and the British Muslim Community 2. Pickthall, Muslims of South Asia, and members of the British Muslim Community of the early 1900s, K. HUMAYUN ANSARI 3. Marmaduke Pickthall and the British Muslim Convert Community JAMIE GILHAM 4. Abdullah Quilliam (Henri de Léon) and Marmaduke Pickthall: Agreements and disagreements between two prominent Muslims in the London and Woking Communities, RON.

Marmaduke Pickthall: British Muslim by. Peter Clark.

Peter Clark’s most popular book is Zoroastrianism: An Introduction to an Ancient Faith. Marmaduke Pickthall: British Muslim by.

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At Beacon Books we specialise in Islamic books ranging from Sufism, poetry and academic works but we’re expanding into different genres . Marmaduke Pickthall: British Muslim is an examination of his ideas and writings.

At Beacon Books we specialise in Islamic books ranging from Sufism, poetry and academic works but we’re expanding into different genres, in particular education and children’s fiction.

Marmaduke Pickthall died on 19 May 1936 at the age of sixty-one. His widow, Muriel, invited Mrs Anne Fremantle, to write a biography. CHAPTER 3 Abdullah Quilliam (Henri De Léon) and Marmaduke Pickthall: Agreements and Disagreements between Two Prominent Muslims in the London and Woking Communities.

Book by Clark, Peter
  • deadly claw
The subject of this delightful volume is someone who life story is more intriguing today than when it was lived. Peter Clark astutely brings his readers through both biography and literary criticism. Pickthall was raised Christian and English but died Muslim and
Indian. He wrote novels, short stories, and religious commentary. His great service to the world was his translation/explanation of the Quran. Clark is masterful at bringing Pickthall out of obscurity.
  • Rude
This is a great book if you can get your hands on it. Most people only know that Pickthall converted to Islam and translated the Qur'an unless they have stumbled upon a collection of his essays called Cultural Side of Islam or sometimes, Islamic Culture. (He also wrote a wonderful novel called Sayeed the Fisherman which I highly recommend.)

In British Muslim, Peter Clark confesses becoming obsessed with Pickthall, who became an "invisible presence" in his home or three years. That seems like an amazingly short period of time to write a research book like this. His sources were mainly out of print periodicals as well as personal letters.

Pickthall wrote extensively as a journalist, and Clark had to locate old editions of Islamic Culture, once published in Hyderbad, and the periodical Islamic Review from Woking, England, as well as New Age of London.

Anyway, there are some really amusing moments in this book. One is when Clark feels he is dealing with a flaw in Pickthall's character or life and tries to explain it away, like his marriage. When Marmaduke was almost 21, he married an old sweetheart, Muriel Smith. When he became a Muslim, she followed two years later. Clark calls the marriage "distant yet affectionate" without much explanation. He goes on to say that Pickthall was "suspicious of romantic love and, after he had embraced Islam--just halfway through the 40 years of his married life--declared frequently that neither party could or should rely on the other: 'The wife is a free servant of Allah, as so is the husband."

However, about 40 pages later, Clark returns to the marriage theme and calls Pickthall's view of marriage "chilly" and ascribes it to "personal loneliness." At the time of reading this, I did not think that a Muslim would have interpreted Pickthall's views in such a way, pointing to the difficulty in a compatriot trying to explain the character of a convert's opinions of life in respect of his new followed religion.

British Muslim describes an erudite, personable and self-thinking man not cowed by popular opinion. We learn that if not for his political ideas deemed dangerous in official circles, Pickthall's "talents as a linguist and as an authority on Syria, Palestine, and Egypt could have been used." Indeed it was because he had a reputation for being a "rabid Turkophile" (i.e. a friend to Turkish people and someone who enjoyed Turkish culture and language) that he was not offered the job with the Arab Bureau in Cairo, then under British rule, that subsequently went to T.E. Lawrence. Thus are world events swayed.

The greatest work of his life, for which so many English speaking Muslism are indebted to him, was not without turmoil. The translation of the "meaning" of the Qur'an (a distinction he always insisted upon) began around 1927, although as early as 1919 when he was acting imam in London, he used to translate passages, piecemeal, for the sake of Friday sermons. His was the first translation of the Qur'an made by a Muslim! At the time he began, Pickthall was teaching in the Nizamate of Hyderbad, an offshoot of the Moghal Empire which had "evaded absorption in the British Empire." The Nizam gave Pickthall special leave of absence on full pay for two years in order to complete the translation. Pickthall decided he should also procure approval from the ulama of al-Azhar in Cairo. he spent three months in Egypt, from November of 1929. and met some leading Egyptian writers, among whom was Taha Hussein, a blind professor of Arabic at the secular university of Cairo.

Hussein seemed to derive delight in annoying Pickthall and throwing obstacles in his way.Pickthall quickly saw through his opponent and later would write about " a certain scholar with a mania for the last Paris models in the way of thought. . . [and whose' taste foreign ideas includes half-baked or wholly unbaked theories concerning the Arabic language, history and Islam."

The Egyptian trip was a failure. King Fuad, who was then toying with the idea of becoming the Caliph, did not support the notion of Pickthall's translation and the 'ulama were thrown in a flutter when it came out. They finally pronounced Pickthall's translation "unfit to be authorized." Ha. Pickthall's translation is still with us today, pronounced by some native Arabic speakers as the closest translation of any. May God bless him. This is a book definitely worth reading.