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Download The Iceman: The True Story of a Cold-Blooded Killer eBook

by Anthony Bruno

Download The Iceman: The True Story of a Cold-Blooded Killer eBook
ISBN:
0385307780
Author:
Anthony Bruno
Category:
True Crime
Language:
English
Publisher:
Delacorte Press (September 1993)
Pages:
289 pages
EPUB book:
1390 kb
FB2 book:
1312 kb
DJVU:
1339 kb
Other formats
doc mobi lrf mobi
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
976


Anthony Bruno is the author of eleven crime novels and four true-crime books, including Seven (based on the hit movie starring Brad Pitt and . This book portrayed the Iceman so clearly, some parts were hard to think about

Anthony Bruno is the author of eleven crime novels and four true-crime books, including Seven (based on the hit movie starring Brad Pitt and Morgan Freeman). His nonfiction work The Seekers: A Bounty Hunter’s Story was nominated for the Edgar Award for best fact crime book. His novel Bad Apple was adapted for television in 2004. This book portrayed the Iceman so clearly, some parts were hard to think about. His personality, the fear he struck in others, he comes alive in these pages. His family was absolutely trapped.

My involvement with the Iceman story started in 1986 when I first learned about Richard Kuklinski, a mass murderer who claimed to have killed scores of people while maintaining an outwardly normal, suburban lifestyle with a wife and three children. The police had nicknamed him the Iceman because he had frozen one of his victims for two years to see if he could disguise the time of death. Clearly this was not a run-of-the-mill killer. I was intrigued, but at the time I had no idea how deeply his story would affect my life. What a long strange trip it has been.

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THE ICE MAN: The True Story of a Cold-Blooded Killer. Пользовательский отзыв - Kirkus. Smoothly written bio of a lone-wolf executioner for the mob. In his first nonfiction book, mystery author Bruno (Bad Moon, 1992, et. puts his writing talents to white-knuckle use with a tight focus.

the tension and stress Polifrone experienced in fulfilling his risky undercover.

Kuklinski, Richard, Murderers, Serial murders, Serial murders, Murderers, Serial murders. New York : Bantam Doubleday Dell Group. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Delaware County District Library (Ohio).

One by Anthony Bruno another by Philip Carlo. I can't say enough about these 2 books. IF you enjoy true crime you will love these books and the C. .Another excellent police "sting " book. The characters ring true and the story, though real, is as imaginable as fiction. The Iceman should never walk the streets again. Read the book and you'll know why. Tight. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 13 years ago.

The author of Bad Guys turns his talents to nonfiction to reveal the story of Richard Kuklinski, a suburban hitman who specialized in cyanide, until one police officer risked his life to hunt down the killer. 30,000 first printing. $30,000 ad/promo.
  • Vijora
This book portrayed the Iceman so clearly, some parts were hard to think about. His personality, the fear he struck in others, he comes alive in these pages. His family was absolutely trapped. His wife lived on a razor's edge between the caring, generous husband and the bellowing, raging giant who broke her nose. That was his good side....he loved his wife. His "love" brought pain and terror. (Knowing something about this myself, it got a little too close) I LIKE knowing he is put away and will never get out. I have the utmost gratitude and respect for the officers who brought him down and brought him to justice, for all their hard work. How fortunate we are to have all these great people who devote their lives, and risk their lives, to stand between us and danger.
Now I need to go read something light and funny.
  • Brightfury
I had this book on my kindle for months thinking it would probably just be an OK book. So one evening I decided to give it a try. I'm 67 and I have read many many true crime books in my life. This is the best true crime story I have ever read. So well written. It was written more like a novel making it a very enjoyable read. It's like you were there. I was so entertained throughout the entire book. My heart went out to some of the victims. I'm so glad I took a chance on this one, I would have missed the chance of reading a great crime story
  • Trash Obsession
I watched the film that was adapted from this book last week, and liked it so much that I had to read this book. It's pretty difficult to decide which one was better, as I am giving both five stars.

I will admit, reading a non-fiction book makes it far more difficult to appreciate a film on the same topic. "The book was so much better" seems to be a common refrain, and it seems that most people almost always have this opinion. Directors and screenwriters change little pieces of the story, often for seemingly no good reason. For example, in the movie, I believe that "Mr. Softie" -- the partner of Richard Kuklinski that drove an ice cream truck -- was killed by the Iceman on a park bench and left there to be found later. In the book, it appears that Mr. Softie was killed in his own ice cream truck, probably in one of his storage spaces, and then left hanging out the purchasing window. Why was it changed? And more importantly, does it really matter?

And a book always gives more detail than a film. In this book, you get most of the background information about the man who investigated Mr. Kuklinski for almost two years: Dominick Polifrone. In the movie, you get very little of this information and he is really just a supporting actor with supporting screen time. (By the way: when you read the book, you will, or at least should, gain unbelievable respect for Mr. Polifrone. While the mob hates his guts and most likely wants him dead, he has risked his life -- and surely far worse -- in his quest to take down some pretty bad guys.)

And there are many other reasons why a book is seemingly always better than a film. But in reality, comparing books and movies is like comparing apples and oranges. A book can be almost any length, although most are kept to 500 pages or less; a movie, while it may be longer, is generally limited to two hours due to both American audience impatience and for the size of one DVD. And this difference is not small; when a book is adapted as a screenplay it requires the screenwriter to cut out anything that is deemed unnecessary, even details sometimes that are important. There just isn't the time in a film to tell it all.

I could go on and on how good this book is, and I would have a point. The writing is really good, especially for true crime. (While I "enjoy" true crime, the writers, outside of perhaps Jack Olsen, just usually aren't that good. I highly recommend taking a peek at his web site where he discussed this point himself while still alive.) I could discuss ad nauseum how nerve wracking it is while the reader becomes almost as scared as Mr. Polifrone for his own life, even his family. But instead and more importantly, I will make the following assertion: books and movies are different media, and people should stop comparing them the way they do. It isn't fair, and it isn't productive. Personally, I like both media myself, and they both have a place.

I read part of a review I think where someone exclaimed, "Read the book first and then watch the movie!" I think he got it reversed, and I would say, "Watch the film and then read the book." That way, while watching the film, you won't get bogged down in minutiae that is just not that important. But I definitely recommend them both, as I'm going 5 stars on the book and 5 stars on the movie.
  • digytal soul
A "totally chilling" story about a brutal man who did so many brutal murders, I've lost count. A fascinating look at the wonderful undercover operations and all it took to finally bring him down. It took YEARS to being this man to justice ~ if there is such a thing for what he's done, but the men who took on that job should be MOST HIGHLY COMMENDED for what they did ~ at the risk of loosing their own lives. The sad part is the family of "The Iceman", who had NO idea of what was really going on. I feel for his wife and children.
  • Qwne
This is a solid true crime novel. I quite enjoyed it, having already seen the HBO interviews and the major motion picture. I learned a few new insights into the Iceman, how he came to be and how ruthless he became before his ultimate downfall. I did hope for a little more of his childhood and adolescence but this book reads great, showing piece by piece how he dismantles his own crew which leads to his own dismantling. It covers a lot of ground on this crew you won't get from the interviews and the movie. My advice is to read it to see what happens in the Iceman's final days.
  • Zovaithug
Anthony Bruno wrote a great biography that is fascinating, chilling, and will almost make you wince sometimes at just how twisted the mind of cold hearted killer can be. This story, unlike stories of crazy psychopaths who seem out of their minds, this story tells of someone who was cold, brutal and calculating. Richard Kuklinski adored his children, showered them gifts and everything money could buy. Yet he killed people in ways that were not only brutal but took time to experiment, did it with curiosity at times and seem to enjoy it. It is disturbing in that there are Mafioso and hit men who believed in what they were doing or were just crazy as hell. Richard Kuklinski was just a cold hearted killer. This story is fascinating and yet more disturbing in some ways than other stories I have read on similar subjects. I truly take my hat off to the author for writing a great biography.
  • Wenes
This kindle edition made me realize nightmares do come true. Anthony Bruno lights a fire and it rages through this book. Richard Kuklinski was the devil in his actions as a hit man for the mafia. He took many lives only to be taken down himself by the legal system that gave him exactly what he deserved. Each of his murders are covered in such graphic detail that you can't stop reading. The author gave me an exciting experience and I hope to read more from him