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Download Waste Land: The Savage Odyssey Of Charles Starkweather And Caril Ann Fugate eBook

by Michael Newton

Download Waste Land: The Savage Odyssey Of Charles Starkweather And Caril Ann Fugate eBook
ISBN:
0671001981
Author:
Michael Newton
Category:
True Crime
Language:
English
Publisher:
Pocket (February 1, 1998)
Pages:
384 pages
EPUB book:
1465 kb
FB2 book:
1365 kb
DJVU:
1250 kb
Other formats
docx lrf mobi lit
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
486


He's an engaging writer, and he lays out the facts of Charles Starkweather and Caril Ann Fugate's killing spree about as clearly as can be hoped for. I guess my problem is that I can't get a good read on how trustworthy he is-just because it's well-written doesn't I'm of two minds about this book. On the one hand, it's all compiled from secondary sources; on the other, Newton collates his sources carefully, talks about discrepancies, and is clearly doing his own thinking, which I appreciate.

Newton has done a good job of time-lining the events from Charlie's early days through his meeting Caril Ann through their rampage and eventual convictions. The book tends to slow down once they are both in custody and the legal events start to unfold.

Waste Land The Savage Odyssey Of Charles Starkweather And Caril Ann Fugate.

Waste Land: The Savage Odyssey of Charles Starkweather and Caril Ann Fugate is a book by Michael Newton, published by Pocket Books, New York City, NY in 1998. Utilizing firsthand interviews, court transcripts, death-row confessions, and d case details, "Waste Land" shines new light on the dark saga of Starkweather and Fugate - from their first kisses and kills to their capture and convictions.

Items related to Waste Land: The Savage Odyssey Of Charles .

Items related to Waste Land: The Savage Odyssey Of Charles Starkweather. Newton, Michael Waste Land: The Savage Odyssey Of Charles Starkweather And Caril Ann Fugate. The story of Charles Starkweather and his fourteen-year-old girlfriend, Caril Ann Fugate, is based on interviews, court transcripts, and death-row confessions and chronicles their eight-day killing spree while outlining their psychological profiles.

Complete with an update on Fugate's life today, WASTE LAND compellingly probes not only the mind-set of history's deadliest juvenile delinquents-but also the tragic end of America's innocence.

Charles Starkweather was born in Lincoln, Nebraska, the third of seven children of Guy and Helen Starkweather. Waste Land: The Savage Odyssey of Charles Starkweather and Caril Ann Fugate. ISBN 978-0-671-00198-8. The Starkweathers were a working-class family. His father Guy was a mild-mannered carpenter who was often unemployed, due to suffering rheumatoid arthritis in his hands  .

book by Michael Newton. Mike Newton shines new light on the dark saga of Charles Starkweather and his 14-year-old girlfriend, Caril Ann Fugate, who in 1958 embarked on a shocking, murderous rampage that lasted eight days and left 11 dead bodies in its wake-including Caril Ann's family.

Manufacturer: Pocket Release date: 1 February 1998 ISBN-10 : 0671001981 ISBN-13: 9780671001988.

Waste Land: The Savage Odyssey of Charles Starkweather and Caril Ann Fugate killing across Nebraska in 1958. Caril Ann Fugate True Crime Books Young Life Serial Killers Young Living. Badlands by Terence Malick.

The story of Charles Starkweather and his fourteen-year-old girlfriend, Caril Ann Fugate, is based on interviews, court transcripts, and death-row confessions and chronicles their eight-day killing spree while outlining their psychological profiles. Original.
  • Gelgen
Pretty gripping account of Starkweather's and Fugil's rampage across Nebraska in the late 50's. Newton has done a good job of time-lining the events from Charlie's early days through his meeting Caril Ann through their rampage and eventual convictions.

The book tends to slow down once they are both in custody and the legal events start to unfold. Other than that it's quite gripping and Newton has done a very good job of putting us on scene via multiple witness accounts (usually Charlie's and Carol's) so we can get a feel for the motivation involved.

Summary: Great account of actual events. Some insight into Charlie's early life and great detail of why he is notorious. Worth the money if a little lengthy.
  • Hawk Flying
I remember the Starkweather event as it was happening. While one knows the basics of the murder spree, only now, using notes from those medical and court persons who interviewed Starkweather and Fugate, can one get a sense of the psychotic personalities involved. Fugate, 13 and going on 21 when the spree occurred, leaves one wondering whether justice was served. She was obvious a precocious 13 year old, mature well beyond her years, who seemed to have plenty of chances to escape Starkweather, but did not. Was she an example of the Stockholm syndrome? Was she a willing participant who managed to see a way to save herself? One gets as good a look at that aspect of the story as one is likely to now from the book as well. Fugate is probably still alive, last living in Michigan, but she sill refuses to say anything, so it's not likely that anything more of any real significance will ever be known about the killing spree now. A very engaging read.
  • Sharpbrew
Good read!
  • Saithinin
I just finished reading it. It's really really good. Not even one boring page. The author writes great.
  • Stanober
Book is as described on the site. A little used but perfectly acceptable. Story is a very interesting take on this famous case. Recommended for all true crime murder fans (if they can be called that!).
  • mr.Mine
Michael Newton's WASTELAND is the story of a murder spree by 19 year old Charles Starkweather and his 14 year old girlfriend, Caril Ann Fugate. The pair terrorized the Lincoln, Nebraska, area for about a week in January 1958, and racked up a body count of 11 innocent people. The book goes into considerable detail about that week as well as the trials and appeals that followed.

The strong points in WASTELAND include Newton's extensive research and his primarily reportorial and non-judgmental style of writing. Newton does not insert his own personality into his narrative. And his characterizations of both Charlie and Caril are in-depth and highly interesting.

Among the negatives is that, in my opinion, the book is probably 75 pages too long. Much time is spent comparing Charlie's and Caril's versions of the events of the murderous week. This becomes tedious, since the versions vary mainly due to both Charlie's and Caril's attempts to avoid blame; because neither of them were much more than emotionally stunted losers; and since ultimately it doesn't matter which version was valid.
Both were totally involved as a team, and Caril's attempts at minimizing her responsibility are clearly bogus as presented in the book. The accounts of their individual trials, totalling over 100 pages, become numbingly repetitive; and they repeat as well the information previously provided regarding Charlie's versus Caril's versions of the murders.

WASTELAND is not a bad book. The portions which present Charlie's and Caril's background information - which in the case of Charlie is extensive - is fascinating, and the accounts of the actual murders and the pair's cross-state odyssey is fast paced and well worth reading. But there is also too much tedious repetition.
This is a good place to learn about this interesting case, which was highly publicized at the time. But it is good, not great, true crime.
  • Nejind
Stephen King is haunted by the story of Charles Starkweather. In this excellent, concise book the dark horror of the killer's 8-day crime spree becomes terrifyingly real--we can understand why King can't forget this example of man's ability to commit pure evil. Starkweather was not merely a homicidal brute--he was essentially amoral, and found/manipulated a willing partner in a 14-year-old girl.

The facts of the case are presented in objective, crisp prose that is compelling and disturbing. Like a particularly well-made horror film, we are terrified but find that we can't stop from finishing to the end. The book provides detailed support information, first-hand accounts, and court records. Some news clippings are reviewed, discussed, and others debunked--but always with a respectful nod to the reporters on the front lines there in the dark days. The author knows that while reporters, under a deadline and writing the day after a murder, may get some facts wrong, they still offer invaluable insight into the tone of the day. In this book, we have the benefit of hindsight 40 years on, from an author who respects the sources, even when they are contradicted by subsequent research.

It is this balanced consideration of resource materials that makes the author's work so credible. This objectivity lends great drama to the book's main focus--the horrible story of Starkweather--because we know that all of the facts may read like a thriller novel, but they are researched and presented in a manner as true as possible to the facts. True crime writing is rarely better than this.

Recommended for those who enjoy true crime, those interested in the dark psychology of serial killers, and anyone interested in the true face of 1950s America.
Interesting book, lots of details, well written and unbiased - so you get all of the information and process it how you like. I'm reading this book a second time now.