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by Magdalen Nabb

Download The Marshal at the Villa Torrini eBook
ISBN:
006016915X
Author:
Magdalen Nabb
Category:
Mystery
Language:
English
Publisher:
HarperCollinsPublishers; 1st U.S. edition (July 1, 1994)
Pages:
192 pages
EPUB book:
1167 kb
FB2 book:
1283 kb
DJVU:
1970 kb
Other formats
txt docx lit lrf
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
878


The Marshal at the Villa Torrini.

The Marshal at the Villa Torrini. CHAPTER 1. 'I suppose I might have pushed he. 'You suppose you might have pushed her?' The Public Prosecutor's voice rose on the last word and then he paused. A nervous cough echoed round the high courtroom as though between movements at a concert.

Television aerials were dragged free of their moorings to dangle precariously over the street, and rubbish bags from over-spilling skips skittered along the roads until they burst and their contents. whirled away to freedom. Mopeds crashed on to their sides to lie in the road and trees moaned and swayed as their weaker branches were torn off to destroy the cars parked in their shelter. By three in the morning the wind had roused just about every inhabitant of the city and sent them scurrying to bolt shutters, bring in forgotten laundry, rescue a favourite plant.

Books related to The Marshal at the Villa Torrini. Death in Florence: A Novel (Inspector Bordelli Mysteries).

Praise for Magdalen Nabb. Every word should be savored. Washington Post Book World

Praise for Magdalen Nabb. Washington Post Book World. The best mystery news in ages is that Soho is restoring to the canon Magdalen Nabb and her tremendous creation, Marshal Guarnaccia of the Italian Police in Florence. Nabb continues to extend conventions of the police procedural to suit her own intriguing vision and purpose. Philadelphia Inquirer. Looking for More Great Reads? Discover Book Picks from the CEO of Penguin Random House US. Close. Download Hi Res. Close

Magdalen Nabb also writes the immensely successful Josie Smith books, set in her native Lancashire, which form the basis of the Granada children's TV series, Josie Smith, scripted by the author.

Aug 31, 2011 Monica rated it liked it. "The Marshal at the Villa Torrini" is the 9th book in the series featuring Marshal Guarnaccia. Magdalen Nabb also writes the immensely successful Josie Smith books, set in her native Lancashire, which form the basis of the Granada children's TV series, Josie Smith, scripted by the author. Her first book, Josie Smith, was runner-up for the Guardian Children's Fiction Award in 1989, and in l99l, Josie Smith and Eileen was winner of the prestigious Smarties Book Prize for the 6-8 age group.

Praise for the Marshal Guarnaccia series: The exquisite sensibility of Magdalen Nabb’s police procedurals . Very much in the spirit of Simenon's Maigret series, Magdalen Nabb's Marshal Guarnaccia mysteries are equal parts procedural insight, portrait of society, and character study.

Praise for the Marshal Guarnaccia series: The exquisite sensibility of Magdalen Nabb’s police procedurals has all to do with the feeling of displacement that. Nabb captures the spirit of real police work, especially when complicated by the politics and bureaucracy that dominate present-day Italy. She also presents Florence in all its beauty and tawdriness, as seen through the eyes of her southern-born hero.

Start by marking the marshall and the villa as Want to Read . It's a problem the Marshal comes up against all the time.

Start by marking the marshall and the villa as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Series: Marshal Guarnaccia Mystery Josie Smith. Books by Magdalen Nabb.

Magdalen Nabb (Author). Book 9 of 14 in the A Florentine Mystery Series.

Magdalen Nabb (16 January 1947 – 18 August 2007) was a British author, best known for the Marshal Guarnaccia detective novels. Born in Church, a village near Accrington in Lancashire as Magdalen Nuttal, she was educated at the Convent Grammar School, Bury, before going on to art college in Manchester, where she studied arts and pottery, which she taught in an art school. In 1975 she moved to Florence in Italy with her son, Liam, even through she didn't speak Italian

Marshal Guarnaccia of the Florence Police is summoned to the Villa Torrini, where he finds the body of a well-known writer, and despite no signs of violence, definite suspicions of murder
  • Dogrel
As Magdalen Nabb continued to write I detected a subtle change in the focus of her concerns. Whereas some authors obsess over a particular city or region and present cardboard cutouts for characters e.g. Donna Leon, Ms. Nabb presents us with characters who are not only influenced by the region they came from, but also the region in which they live at the moment.

In this novel the characters of the Sardinian recruit Giuseppe Fara, Substitute Prosecutor Fusari, and Captain Maestrangelo, lend a different flavor to the Florentine mix. If there is one disappointment with the Nabb novels, it is that Captain Maestrangelo was never fully developed. But this book does present us with a rich collections of characters, even the least sympathetic of characters and I mean the Englishman widow Forbes who is one the most unappealing characters I have met in mysteries, and as such should be read with particular attention to the author's nuances.

Yes, this a competent and befuddling mystery but so much more, a carnival of people preforming on the stage of florence.
  • Whitescar
I would recommend this book, but not for someone looking for forensic explanation or page-turning suspense. Although the story is not exactly gripping, the writing is good and the Marshall is an intriguing character, so a person wants to finish the book. That's more than I can say about some books it has been my misfortune to buy over the last few years.

Like some well-selling mysteries set in Italy and Canada, nothing much happens, and what does happen involves more thinking than action. It's not as dull as some cozies, and is better written than a lot of mysteries. The reader cares about the Marshall, but the other characters are written so sketchily that it's difficult to summon much interest in them. Some of the characters are unsympathetic, and it's not clear that the author intended all of them to be. Most readers will guess the big secret midway through the book, but there are still a couple of mild surprises at the end.
  • Hilarious Kangaroo
Nabb is so overlooked. Memorable setting and characters, strong plot. A main character unlike any other,and one you develop a loyalty to.
  • Fawrindhga
Nabb has written several books in this series, but I found this particular one too slow moving. It has strong description, so it does a good job setting the scene, but I thought there was too much dialog and not quite enough action.
  • DarK-LiGht
great
  • Tygrarad
Very much in the spirit of Simenon's Maigret series, Magdalen Nabb's Marshal Guarnaccia mysteries are equal parts procedural insight, portrait of society, and character study. Nabb captures the spirit of real police work, especially when complicated by the politics and bureaucracy that dominate present-day Italy. She also presents Florence in all its beauty and tawdriness, as seen through the eyes of her southern-born hero. The Marshal is a marvellous creation, an eternal outsider who thinks himself to be slow and is regularly underestimated by colleagues and criminals alike. Nabb's books are too often underestimated as well--by the likes of people who cannot spell either aficionado or eccentric--which is a shame. While Michael Dibdin's fine books centering on the adventures of Aurelio Zen are more sensational, Nabb's Guarnaccia novels have every bit as much heart and shrewd observation. I recommend them all and devoutly wish that *The Monster of Florence* would finally be published in the U. S.
  • Zetadda
This mystery has it all: awkward writing, a simplistic plot with no twists or turns, a plodding protagonist who never redeems himself, and snippets of a totally unnecessary and unexplained second mini-police/judicial case crowding its way throughout the main story.
This book may be the ideal reading material for excentric elderly English spinsters who speak to their dead Pomeranians or Pekinese and don't wish to have their pulses quickened.
I actually read every last word -- even to the final page -- to ensure that there was not some exceedingly clever turn of events that would make the pedestrian writing and jumble of disjointed events come together brilliantly. Nothing to fear: the author did not pull a Columbo.
If you have the choice, watch water dehydrate. It will prove to be more satisfying by several orders of magnitude.