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by Christopher Kay,Jane Stevenson

Download London Bridges eBook
ISBN:
1841972266
Author:
Christopher Kay,Jane Stevenson
Category:
Mystery
Language:
English
Publisher:
Clipper Audio; Unabridged edition (January 1, 2000)
EPUB book:
1643 kb
FB2 book:
1833 kb
DJVU:
1506 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
202


London Bridges has an intricate plot, and it's very easy to get lost in its twists and turns (I need to re-read some of the sections with Lamprini to work out exactly how she was involved in the whole Mount Athos scenario). Don't read the book expecting (as the blurb promises) a classic crime novel either - the murderer and the murderee are obvious from the start, ditto most of the crimes, and frankly the whole crime situation isn't that believable.

SEVERAL DECEPTIONS, Jane Stevenson's brilliant and highly acclaimed novella collection, was an outstanding literary debut.

SEVERAL DECEPTIONS, Jane Stevenson's brilliant and highly acclaimed. SEVERAL DECEPTIONS, Jane Stevenson's brilliant and highly acclaimed novella collection, was an outstanding literary debut. Now, with her first novel, she again offers readers a work of dazzling intelligence, elegant wit, and keen social observation. An affectionate homage to the classic English detective story, LONDON BRIDGES is set in 1990s London and crafted with a very SEVERAL DECEPTIONS, Jane Stevenson's brilliant and highly acclaimed novella collection, was an outstanding literary debut.

SEVERAL DECEPTIONS, Jane Stevenson's brilliant and highly acclaimed novella collection, was an outstanding . An affectionate homage to the classic English detective story, LONDON BRIDGES is set in 1990s London and crafted with a very modern spin. Its plot centers on a treasure lost in the Blitz and newly discovered by an unscrupulous lawyer, who is tempted by greed into a series of crimes leading to murder.

Find nearly any book by Christopher Kay. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. by Tom Holt, Christopher Kay. ISBN 9781841972671 (978-1-84197-267-1) Clipper Audio, 2003. Find signed collectible books: 'Olympiad'.

Jane Stevenson is the author of the acclaimed novella collection Several Deceptions . Documents Similar To London Bridges by Jane Stevenson - Discussion Questions.

Jane Stevenson is the author of the acclaimed novella collection Several Deceptions and The Winter Queen, the first in a trilogy of historical novels. Born and bred in London, she teaches comparative literature at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland. Questions for Discussion. Then I graduated to adult books at a ridiculously early age because I had run out of things to read.

Pierce adopted both Chris and his late sister Charlotte when their biological father Dermot died in 1986, while he was married to Cassandra. Chris's mother Cassandra, passed away at the age of 43 following a battle with ovarian cancer, back in 1991. His sister Charlotte tragically also died from ovarian cancer in 2013 at the age of just 41.

Stevenson was soon active in London literary life, becoming acquainted with many of the writers of the time, including . Alongside Stevenson's portrait are scenes from some of his books and his house in Western Samoa.

Alongside Stevenson's portrait are scenes from some of his books and his house in Western Samoa. Two million notes were issued, each with a serial number beginning "RLS".

The London Bridge Hostel. It pays to book direct. St Christopher's At The Village, London Bridge. Where to Next? Check in Check Out. Hostel. 161-165 Borough High St, London SE1 1HR, United Kingdom. Check-in: 2pm, Check-out: 10am. Kinda lost? Get directions.

Robert Louis Stevenson Biography - The Scottish novelist, poet, essayist and travel writer, Robert Louis Stevenson . Entering into youth, Stevenson was highly influenced by Allison Cunningham, his nurse who would often read the Pilgrim’s Progress and The Old Testament to him.

Robert Louis Stevenson Biography - The Scottish novelist, poet, essayist and travel writer, Robert Louis Stevenson was born on November 13, 1850 in Edinburgh, Scotland.

Jack London was his pen name, likely born in San Francisco, California as John Griffith Chaney. Like the restive characters in his works, London sought a variety of experiences as a young man including sailor, hobo and an agitator for jobs during the depression. He also wrote some of the earliest Dystopian Fiction, including The Iron Heel which portrays America under tyrannical rule, written ten years before the Bolsheviks took over Russia. His best-selling book during his lifetime was his 1910 novel Burning Daylight.

  • Whitestone
Second time I have bought this. Jane Stevenson is so entertaining but with such a depth of feeling and history. I only wish I could live in her London. This book also led me to read the complete works of Margery Allingham. Another writer who swims in the multiple rivers of time that sweep through this city. I am now going to re-read her historical trilogy.
  • Haralem
This extremely well-written and entertaining book is a quasi-thriller constructed around an exploration of how people meet and forge their own communities. Set in London, the story is populated by a disparate upper-middle class cast of professionals who are entwined in a plot revolving around some valuable South Bank real estate owned by a Greek monastery. Events are set in motion when two different groups discover the existence of the property, as well as the possibility of the existence of priceless antiques in a safe-deposit box. The story opens with a prologue out of chronological order that foreshadows events to come. Then the reader is taken back a few weeks to meet the villain of the piece, a snobby but poor lawyer who is given the task of wrapping up the affairs of an estate that puts him in contact with the South Bank property and forgotten relics. It also puts him in touch with a cunning Greek businesswoman, and the two convince each other that they might be able to get their hands on these precious items by conning an elderly Anglo-Greek banking agent into assigning the lawyer power of attorney.

Meanwhile (a phrase much used in the book), an enthusiastic preservationist has discovered an old fountain and thinks the South Bank property (currently an ad hoc community garden) is just the place for it. He's comes up with the grand scheme to get the monastary to donate the land for the project, and ropes in his friend Hattie, who works for a foundation (trust in the UK) dedicated to the nebulous task of improving London. She brings on board her friend who is a campy gay classics professor who just happens to know the abbot of the monastary. It all gets rather complicated to explain, but soon these characters all start to cross paths, along with an Australian graduate student in the classics program who moonlights as a pharmacist, an Indian lawyer born and bred in London who works at the villain's firm, and various other minor characters. These are all well-drawn figures that occasionally border on cliché at times, but whenever we see them at work or at home, they are always doing things that give them depth and life, and Stevenson shows a nice ear for dialogue. Of course, everything is pretty much constrained to the well-meaning striving set of law, academia, trusts, art, and so on, but it's still well done.

The story walks that fine line of being literate without becoming pretentious. The "thriller" aspect almost borders on a Scooby-Doo story where the gang starts to put the puzzle together, but a murder keeps things dark enough to avoid tounge-in-cheekitis. There is comedy and wit, and the climax is perhaps a bit over-the-top in the wackiness, but Stevenson makes it work nonetheless. The plot does require one to go along with a heavy dose of coincidence in terms of these people all knowing each other, but if one can get past that, it's vastly entertaining stuff. The book also mainly succeeds as a slice of London life that is a homage to the bonds of friendship. There is perhaps a little too much detail of what people wear and their home decor, but its all within context. Of course, it helps if one is predisposed to books about London and Londoners, but it should appeal to metropolitan dwellers anywhere. A thoroughly fun book that will have me seeking out more of Stevenson's works.
  • Voodoosida
London has long been an international city and, in London Bridges, Jane Stevenson is keen to show just how networked it, and its inhabitants are. Geographically London spans the globe in this short novel and, on a temporal plane, London reaches through history. At the heart of the novel is, Eugenides, a Greek lawyer, an aging gentleman of the old school, with ties to an ancient Greek Monastery. He has in his possession rare manuscripts, and within his power of attorney, access to priceless relics over which he is charged to supervise at the request of his monastic clients. With all these qualifications, he is a natural target for con-artists. In no time, they find him, and the effort to swindle commences. Stevenson's London is magnetic: a visiting Australian student, a London lawyer of Indian descent, Greek monks and Greek crooks, a British scholar of ancient Greece, Brits residing in France: all, and others besides, play key roles in Stevenson's novel. There are times in London Bridges when I felt that Stevenson was losing control -- when the novel's complex plot had kidnapped the writer. "Meanwhile, on Saturday of that week, Hattie rang Sebastian." "Edward, meanwhile, had entered a stage of abject, bowel-liquidising terror..." "Meanwhile in Islington, Hattie Luck was getting ready to go to a party." "Jeanne, meanwhile, had troubles of her own." Meanwhile the reader is tossed around like the hapless tourist in a Puerta Vallarta cab. One advantage of the plot, with its "meanwhile-back-at-the-ranch" tempo, is that it does move the novel along. As does the prose, for Ms. Stevenson does not squander words. Ms. Stevenson's novel shows us a London at once vast and knowable. She merits a wide readership, especially among those of us who call other cities home, but who retain connections to that most international of capitals.
  • Malalrajas
Came across this highly original British mystery while scanning the sale shelves at my local library. The story concerns a trove of valuable ancient Greek artifacts. The lawyer who handles the account for his firm realizes that the existence of the artifacts is little known to the actual owners, a monastery in Athos, Greece. He slowly becomes drawn into a plot to acquire some of the treasures for himself. The plot itself, while original, is not the sole point of interest of the novel. Ms. Stevenson has drawn a fascinating, diverse set of characters, and several gripping subplots. Lots of local color - she takes you by the hand to a number of interesting locations in and around London. While the story is slow in unfolding, and not high in action, the book is a rewarding read, both for its vivid characterizations and an original premise.