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by Frank VIVIANO

Download Blood washes blood eBook
ISBN:
0712684328
Author:
Frank VIVIANO
Category:
Mystery
Language:
English
Publisher:
Century; 1st ed. edition (2001)
Pages:
352 pages
EPUB book:
1468 kb
FB2 book:
1313 kb
DJVU:
1837 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
437


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Blood Washes Blood deserves the acclaim and attention of such recent classics as MIDNIGHT IN THE GARDEN OF GOOD AND EVIL and UNDER THE TUSCAN SUN. Though Viviano's narrative is based on a true murder-that of his great, great Grandfather and namesake, this reads. Though Viviano's narrative is based on a true murder-that of his great, great Grandfather and namesake, this reads like the most gripping murder mystery. The reader is transported to Sicily and effortlessly travels back and forth in time to a land tainted with the blood of outlaw honor. The sense of place is evocative and heady, rich with the physical sensualness of Sicily

Lu sangu lava lu sangu, 'Blood Washes Blood'. Sicilian proverb, alluding to the torrent of unforgiving vengeance that flows from an unforgivable offence.

Lu sangu lava lu sangu, 'Blood Washes Blood'. More than a century ago, Frank Viviano's namesake was murdered at a lonely crossroads in Sicily. He had been a revolutionary and a thief, a Robin-Hood bandit who traveled by night in the robes of a friar. Sicilians called him 'the Monk'. Shortly before his death in 1993, Viviano's grandfather whispered the name of the murderer - and nothing more.

Blood Washes Blood: A Tr. .has been added to your Cart. By the end of the book, I felt that Frank Viviano had not only solved a family mystery but came to grips with some aspects of his own life that became clearer. It is no surprise that he is an award-winning journalist

Blood Washes Blood: A Tr. It is no surprise that he is an award-winning journalist. If you are a reader and have not visited Sicily, Danilo Dolci's SICILIAN LIVES brings 20th Century Sicilian culture/norms to life, even if it does stop at the early 1980's.

Books online: Blood Washes Blood: A True Story of Love, Murder, and Redemption Under the Sicilian Sun, 2002, Fishpond. Frank Viviano, at-large foreign correspondent for the San Francisco Chronicle, has covered events ranging from the fall of Marcos in the Philippines and the Tiananmen Square crackdown to the collapse of the Soviet Union and the Bosnian civil war. A two-time recipient of the World Affairs Council's Thomas Storke Award for Achievements in International Reporting, he is the author of six other books.

A True Story of Love, Murder, and Redemption Under the Sicilian Sun. By Frank Viviano

A True Story of Love, Murder, and Redemption Under the Sicilian Sun. By Frank Viviano. I bought books on Sicily wherever I found them, straightforward tourist guides and obscure academic studies in English, French, and Italian, until I'd accumulated a respectable library. I hoarded vacation days, letting them pile up until I could take off for a couple of months.

Frank Viviano is a Sicilian-American journalist and foreign correspondent. His books, published in 14 countries, include Dispatches from the Pacific Century (1993) and Blood Washes Blood: A True Story of Love, Murder, and Redemption Under the Sicilian Sun (2001)

Frank Viviano is a Sicilian-American journalist and foreign correspondent. His books, published in 14 countries, include Dispatches from the Pacific Century (1993) and Blood Washes Blood: A True Story of Love, Murder, and Redemption Under the Sicilian Sun (2001). He is the author of five other books. He is an 8-time nominee for the Pulitzer Prize, and has been named Journalist of the Year by four media and current events organizations in the United States, including the World Affairs Council and the Society of Professional Journalists.

Viviano, by returning to the Sicilian village where all his grandparents were.

His take is haunted, from its violent opening to its stunning climax, by an ancient Sicilian proverb, Lu sangu lava lu sangu, "Blood washes blood": the torrent of unforgiving vengeance that flows from an unforgivable offense

  • Damand
My own maternal Grandparents emigrated from Terrasini, Sicily as children in the early 1900's, and we Grandchildren heard some of the stories related in BLOOD WASHES BLOOD when growing up in St. Louis, Missouri. Terrasini in the 19th Century was only a town of a little over 2,000 people (Today it has about 10,000), and 19 families make up ~ 90% of the population. My Mother's relatives had lived there for over two centuries. Some of our family have been fortunate enough to return there on vacations, and my husband and I have visited twice in the last 3 years (Sicily is very much like Southern California where we live). The Viviano Family (St. Louis branch) are related to the DiMercurio's in St. Louis - my Mother's relatives.

Having taken a course in Sicilian Studies under the auspices of the University of California, I was already familiar with the feudal and absolute structure of Sicily's ruling class up to the late 19th Century. Frank Viviano does a terrific job of bringing that life to light, as well as the confining and demeaning influence of the Mafia and Sicily's current economic woes. Unemployment in Palermo Province still sits around 20% even in these most prosperous times. I did not realize that Sicily was under martial law, at least, twice after the reunification of Italy because of the widespread political unrest, resulting in many emigrants - including my Great-Grandparents and Grandparents - literally escaping from the island under false pretenses to reach an Italians or other port where they could get a ship to the USA without a valid exit visa. I think Frank Viviano does a great job describing the impact of the reunification effort on Sicilians and even mentions the atrocity of Partinico, although he merely alludes to the torture and cannibalism that occured there so near to lovely Terrasini. A people can only withstand oppression for so long, then...

By the end of the book, I felt that Frank Viviano had not only solved a family mystery but came to grips with some aspects of his own life that became clearer. It is no surprise that he is an award-winning journalist. If you are a reader and have not visited Sicily, Danilo Dolci's SICILIAN LIVES brings 20th Century Sicilian culture/norms to life, even if it does stop at the early 1980's. So much has changed in Sicily for the better as we noted when we were there in 2005, but the inherent Sicilian nature is certainly portrayed accurately in this gem.
  • hulk
I gave this book to a friend like that would love reading it if you're a tag and I think she Sicilian anyway I'm sure she's enjoyed it or she would've mentioned to me that she didn't
  • Gavirgas
This book mesmerized me. It was good history, good literature, and good psychology wrapped into one. The author tries to understand himself by negotiating over crumbling Sicilian ledger books with tyrannical Sicilian bureaucrats. What he finds leads to the best analysis of Mafia history and psychology I've ever encountered.
Whether or not you're interested in the Mafia, you couldn't find better insight into how human beings are shaped over the generations by the interplay of culture and history. Yet you will read this book like a detective novel.
The author does not try to put a good face on himself, his family, or Sicilian culture. Nor does he push some re-tread theories to explain their shortcomings. He's just presenting the facts as he stumbles across them. How he puts the facts together make the book feel exciting yet absolutely true. He paints an honest picture of human psychology, human families, and human governments - but in such an entertaining way that I think it would be compelling whether or not this is your family culture.
As someone who is from this culture (Partinico), I can attest that he has nailed it perfectly.
  • Saberdragon
This book is the most evocative, brilliant book I have read in years. (And as an English professor , I have read a lot.) First, it is an autobiographical story of a first generation Sicilian American who can find no peace in our restless, rootless culture. He goes to Sicily to find his roots, and more to find the answer to a family mystery of murder. But that is just the skeleton. The book moves on several levels simultaneously: the personal quest; the nature of Sicilian culture described with a spirit of place that would have done D.H. Lawrence proud; the historical origins of the systema or Mafia told without bias, realistically and sympathetically and the story of the modern destruction of folklife everywhere. All of these strands are woven more brilliantly than any novel I have read in years. And this is not a novel; it is truth. If I may add on a personal note: I am the widow of a first generation Sicilian American whom I loved and tried to understand for over 40 years. This book has helped pull together some of the puzzling pieces of the Sicilian character. Please Mr. Viviano, please use your enormous talent to write more books of this type.
  • Tamesya
A friend told me about this book, so I checked it out from the library. After reading it, I had to have my own copy. Being of Sicilian heritage, all of my grandparents having emigrated from there, I found this book to be not only fascinating reading, but very informative about Sicilian traditions. The author's ancestors all came from the same village as my grandparents. Upon reading this book, written by Frank Viviano, I discovered that his family and mine share some common roots which made the book even more fascinating for me. His research shed so much light on life in late 19th and early 20th century Sicily. I highly recommend this book to anyone of Sicilian descent or anyone interested in Sicilian history.
  • Alsanadar
A young writer goes to Italy to find out about his family roots. He was told a story about his great grandfather who was referred to as "The Monk". He finds out that his great grandfather had been murdered. He is on the trail to find out why and who may have done it. The story tells us a great deal about the history of Sicily. And some very interesting information as to how the original Cosa Nostra may have been formed.
  • HelloBoB:D
Really enjoyed reading this book by an old classmate of mine. I'd occasionally wondered whatever happened to Franky. Now I know so much more about his family history and that of Sicily. He sure took me back to the Detroit of the 50s, too and the days of fruit and vegetable vendors. Anyone with family connections to Sicily will really enjoy his thorough research.