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by Michael Connelly,Joseph Wambaugh

Download The Blue Knight eBook
ISBN:
0446509191
Author:
Michael Connelly,Joseph Wambaugh
Category:
Mystery
Language:
English
Publisher:
Grand Central Publishing (April 1, 2008)
EPUB book:
1573 kb
FB2 book:
1927 kb
DJVU:
1752 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.8
Votes:
983


Joseph Wambaugh, an ex-cop and the writer of this book, is very good at creating compelling, complex, flawed characters. And Wambaugh was one of the first cop novelists to successfully write in-depth about the personal lives of policemen.

Joseph Wambaugh, an ex-cop and the writer of this book, is very good at creating compelling, complex, flawed characters. From the intro: It's not about how the cops work the cases; it's about how the cases work the cops). Wambaugh was also a creative force behind the . show "Police Story" (1973-1978) which was hailed for being one of the very first cop shows to portray the life relatively realistically.

The Blue Knight book. Ex-cop turned New York Times bestselling writer Joseph Wambaugh. my reading of the Harry Bosch stories by Michael Connelly.

Writer Joseph Wambaugh was born in East Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on January 22, 1937. Michael Connelly, Connelly graduated from the University of Florida in 1980 where he majored in journalism and minored in creative writing

Writer Joseph Wambaugh was born in East Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on January 22, 1937. He joined the Marines right out of high school, but later earned both a B. A. and M. from California State College in Los Angeles. He worked for the Los Angeles Police Department from 1960 to 1974. Michael Connelly, Connelly graduated from the University of Florida in 1980 where he majored in journalism and minored in creative writing. After graduation, he worked at newspapers in Daytona Beach and Fort Lauderdale, Florida, specializing in the crime beat. He was writing about the police and crime during the wave of violence that came over South Florida during the "cocaine wars.

true crime": The Onion Field. Later books included The Glitter Dome (a TV-movie adaptation starred James Garner and John Lithgow), The Delta Star, and Lines and Shadows. In 1992, Wambaugh generated controversy with his nonfiction book, Echoes in the Darkness, based on the murder of Susan Reinert, a teacher in the Upper Merion School District in suburban Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Michael Connelly is the bestselling author of 33 novels. Visit ww. ichaelConnelly. com for more information.

Wambaugh Joseph THERE IS A BEDROCK TRUTH that resides in the heart of this book. Wambaugh brought the truth with him when he left the police department for the publishing house

THERE IS A BEDROCK TRUTH that resides in the heart of this book. And that is that the best crime stories are not about how cops work on cases. They are about how cases work on cops. Wambaugh brought the truth with him when he left the police department for the publishing house. A century after its first inception the crime novel had moved from the hands of Edgar Allan Poe to the practitioners of the private eye novel.

Books related to The Blue Knight.

Ex-cop turned New York Times bestselling writer Joseph Wambaugh forged a new kind of literature with his great early police procedurals. Gritty, luminous, and ultimately stunning, this novel is Wambaugh at his best-a tale of a street cop on the hardest beat of his life. Twenty and two. Those are the numbers turning in the mind of William "Bumper" Morgan: twenty years on the job, two days before he "pulls the pin" and walks away from it forever. Books related to The Blue Knight.

The Blue Knight – E-book de Joseph Wambaugh. Ex-cop turned New York Times bestselling writer Joseph Wambaugh forged a new kind of literature with his great early police procedurals

The Blue Knight – E-book de Joseph Wambaugh. Lisez ce livre via l'application Google Play Livres sur votre PC et vos appareils Android ou iOS. Téléchargez The Blue Knight pour le lire hors connexion, mettre des passages en surbrillance, ajouter un marque-page ou prendre des notes en cours de lecture. Ex-cop turned New York Times bestselling writer Joseph Wambaugh forged a new kind of literature with his great early police procedurals.

Ex-cop turned #1 New York Times bestselling writer Joseph Wambaugh forged a new kind of literature with his great early police procedurals. Gritty, luminous, and ultimately stunning, this novel is Wambaugh at his best--a tale of a street cop on the hardest beat of his life. Twenty and two. Those are the numbers turning in the mind of William "Bumper" Morgan: twenty years on the job, two days before he "pulls the pin" and walks away from it forever. But on the gritty streets of L.A., people look at Bumper like some kind of knight in armor--they've plied him with come-ons, hot tips, and the hard respect a man can't earn anywhere else. Now, with a new job and a good woman waiting for him, a kinky thief terrorizing L.A.'s choice hotels, and a tragedy looming, Bumper Morgan is about to face the only thing that can scare him: the demons that he's been hiding behind his bright and shiny badge...
  • Zodama
I've known about Joseph Wambaugh for many years, having grown up in Los Angeles, catching a few episodes of "The Blue Knight" TV series re-runs (starring George Kennedy) as a kid, and eventually embarking on a law enforcement career myself--mind you, I was Federal, not LAPD or LASD, but I've worked with (and befriended) enough SoCal municipal cops in my lifetime to be able to forge a common bond with them ("the bond of the badge," if you will).

It was one particular retired LAPD officer within my circle of friends (one of my USC Trojan football tailgating buddies) who mentioned personally knowing and working with Joe Wambaugh and thus motivated to add a couple of Joe's books to my e-reader, and I started off with "TBK."

I can now see why Mr. Wambaugh is such a popular author, with book critics and the general book-buying public alike, with cops and non-cops alike. An excellent writing style, hard-nosed, gritty, witty, and with an excellent eye for detail. Officer Bumper Morgan is a fascinating character who gives 21st century readers a very revealing insight into the mindset of L.A. cops and a snapshot of life in L.A. in general during the pre-PC days of the early 1970s. Never a dull moment, and an ending that'll hit you like a ton of bricks.

--p. 8: "A one-man foot beat’s the best job in this or any police department. It always amuses policemen to see the movies where the big hood or crooked politician yells, 'I’ll have you walking a beat, you dumb flatfoot,' when really it’s a sought-after job." Haha, tell that to Jimmy Malone (Sean Connery) in "The Untouchables."

--p. 14: "Women are like cops, they sense things." Women's intuition = Cop's intuition? So, does that go double for female cops? (Contrast that with Leslie Nielsen in "The Naked Gun: From the Files of Police Squad": "It's true what they say, cops and women don't mix. It's like eating a spoonful of Drano; sure, it'll clean you out, but it'll also leave you feeling hollow inside.")

--p. 15: "'See that man,' she said. 'That’s a policeman. He’ll come and get you and put you in jail if you’re bad.' She gave me a sweet smile, very smug because she thought I was impressed with her good citizenship. Frankie, who was only a half head taller than the kid, took a step toward them and said, 'That’s real clever, lady. Make him scared of the law. Then he’ll grow up hating cops because you scared him to death.'" Reminds me of my maternal cousins who gave me an abnormal fear of cops as a 4 y/o kid, claiming that police arrested babies for crying.

A cigar aficionado! Way to go, Bumper!
  • JoJosho
My second favorite cop novel, with first place going to "Serpico" by the brilliant Peter Maas.

Joseph Wambaugh, an ex-cop and the writer of this book, is very good at creating compelling, complex, flawed characters. And Wambaugh was one of the first cop novelists to successfully write in-depth about the personal lives of policemen. (From the intro: It's not about how the cops work the cases; it's about how the cases work the cops).

Wambaugh was also a creative force behind the t.v. show "Police Story" (1973-1978) which was hailed for being one of the very first cop shows to portray the life relatively realistically. "Police Story" is considered to be the link between less realistic cop series such as "Starsky and Hutch" (1975-1979) and more realistic series such as "Hill Street Blues" (1981-1987). In my mind, "Police Story" was more realistic than "Hill Street Blues," which has been described by its cocreator and head writer, Steven Bochco, as "a fairy tale."

As for the movie based on this novel, William Holden was quite good in the lead role of Bumper Morgan, a flawed and complex yet likeable and competent cop. Other than that, the movie, which was made for t.v., made a lot of crucial casting mistakes and did not follow the novel nearly as closely as I would have liked.

But getting back to the book, it's a very good read. I highly recommend this one. (If you've never read a cop novel before, you might want to start with "Serpico," and if that novel trips your trigger, then give "The Blue Knight" a shot.)
  • Vutaur
I read this book more than 40 years ago when it was first published in 1970. It made a strong impression on me, and made me a life-long Joseph Wambaugh fan. Re-reading it just reinforced how great a novel it is (and unbelievably a first novel) and why it's a classic. Many times when you look back at an author's first novel, particularly after more than four decades, it pales in comparison to his later works. That's certainly not the case with The New Centurions. It's an incredibly well-written and deep novel.

Wambaugh follows three LAPD recruits--Roy Fehler, Sergio Duran and Gus Plebsley from police academy in the early summer of 1960 through the end of the Watts riots in the summer of 1965. The three recruits go their separate ways after the police academy, but are reunited at the tail end of the Watts riots.

Wambaugh, a 14-year veteran of the LAPD, pulls back the multi-layered veil of the police officer to reveal the doubts, fears, uncertainty and frustrations they experience on a daily basis. Being a LAPD cop is an "often thankless" job, and getting a daily dose of the worst of society takes its toll. Reality is often the opposite of what police officers and the public believe it to be.

Here are some insights from the characters in The New Centurions:

Veteran police officer Kilvinsky: "Police work is 100 percent common sense. That's about what makes a policeman, common sense and the ability to make a quick decision. You've got to cultivate those abilities or get out."

Supervisor Milton: "This is a brutal business...if you learn something about yourself that you'd be better off not knowing, well, just slide along, it'll work out."

Officer Plebsley: "All my life I believed what people told me was the truth, and I was a lousy policeman until I got over that mistake. Now I know they'll lie when the truth would help. They'll lie when their lives depend on the truth."

From Wambaugh: "Policemen have a secret which seemed to unite them more closely than normal friendships and that was the knowledge that they knew things, basic things about strength and weakness, courage and pain, good and evil, especially good and evil."

The New Centurions provides a realistic view of what it's like to be a member of the LAPD and how police duty changes men. It's a powerful novel.
  • Rishason
I was surprised actually. The book dates from 1970 and offers a reflection of the attitudes and prejudices of the time. The language is pretty raw, from before the notion of politically correct.