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Download Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere: A Mystery (The Toronto Series) eBook

by John McFetridge

Download Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere: A Mystery (The Toronto Series) eBook
ISBN:
1550227556
Author:
John McFetridge
Category:
Mystery
Language:
English
Publisher:
ECW Press; 1St Edition edition (May 1, 2008)
Pages:
334 pages
EPUB book:
1458 kb
FB2 book:
1328 kb
DJVU:
1157 kb
Other formats
txt lrf mobi mbr
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
462


Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere is the second studio album by the Canadian singer Neil Young, released in May 1969 on Reprise Records catalogue RS 6349.

Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere is the second studio album by the Canadian singer Neil Young, released in May 1969 on Reprise Records catalogue RS 6349. His first with his longtime backing band Crazy Horse, it peaked at number 34 on the US Billboard 200 during a ninety-eight week chart stay in August 1970 and has been certified platinum by the RIAA

After the publication of his debut novel Dirty Sweet, the parallels between John McFetridge and that master of crime fiction Elmore Leonard were readily apparent.

Shelves: black-comedy, noir. John Mcfetridge has crafted three (to date) interwoven novels set in modern Toronto a city filled to the brim with numerous ethnic groups, corruption, gentrification, and organized crime. After the publication of his debut novel Dirty Sweet, the parallels between John McFetridge and that master of crime fiction Elmore Leonard were readily apparent. Both novelists concern themselves with criminals slightly less smart than they put on, and police slightly smarter than they let on.

Because McFetridge is the real deal

Because McFetridge is the real deal. Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere, his latest novel, is tough, gritty, authentic, and peopled with characters who survive on quick wits and dark gallows humor on the mean streets of Toronto, one of North America's largest, most disfunctional cities. Once known as "Toronto, The Good," McFetridge has captured the darkest underbelly of "Toronto, The Bad," with the sharpest eye for location and character and the keenest ear for dialogue

Dirty sweet - Everybody knows this is nowhere - Swap. Includes the novels Dirty Sweet, Everybody Knows this is Nowhere, and Swap.

Dirty sweet - Everybody knows this is nowhere - Swap. Maybe it's his new partner, Ojibwa native Detective Armstrong. Or maybe it's the missing ten-year-old girl, or the unidentified torso dumped in an alley behind a motel, or what looks like corruption deep within the police force.

She knows what everybody knows. The whole world might be coming here, but this is nowhere. Tumblin’ Dice: A Mystery. Every god-damned time. The Toronto Forensics Scene of Crime team was made up of police officers. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Some civilians worked in fingerprint analysis and identification. On minor crimes evidence was collected by SOCO, Scene of Crime Officers - regular uniform cops who’d taken a few extra courses. But all major crimes are handled by fis cops, Forensic Identification Services.

She knows what everybody knows Toronto thinks it's the centre of some multicultural universe, always . Toronto thinks it's the centre of some multicultural universe, always bragging about how people come from every part of the world to live there. The punch line? Some of them are coming to commit crimes. So yeah, Sharon MacDonald's got a problem. Even though I didn't finish this book (she confessed), I am certainly recommending it to my patrons who are looking for a new author in Crime Fiction Читать весь отзыв. Everybody knows this is nowhere.

Формируйте собственную /коллекция/ коллекцию записей Neil Young With Crazy Horse.

Akashic Books continues its groundbreaking series of original noir anthologies, launched in 2004 with Brooklyn Noir.

Jackie Robinson is playing for the Royals, the jazz clubs are hopping and the backrooms are full of people losing money at the barbotte tables. Nat Lawson is home from the war working for the phone company and moonlighting running 'silent' lines for bookies when Leah Aidelbaum asks him to play private ey. incent Valentine. Akashic Books continues its groundbreaking series of original noir anthologies, launched in 2004 with Brooklyn Noir. Each story is set in a distinct neighborhood or location within the city of the book.

Because McFetridge is the real deal. Recently Viewed and Featured. The Good Citizen: A History of American Civic Life.

The joke? Toronto thinks it’s the centre of some multicultural universe, always bragging about how people come from every part of the world to live there. The punch line? Some of them are coming to commit crimes. So yeah, Sharon MacDonald's got a problem. And no, it’s not being trapped in her apartment, tethered to a court-ordered tracking device. It’s not the guy who just fell 25 stories and through the roof of a car. Not the cops preventing her from getting to the grow rooms. It’s not even the mystery man who shows up with a life-saving plan that just might work. Sharon’s problem is Ray: he’s too good-looking. Detective Gord Bergeron has problems too. Maybe it’s his new partner, Ojibwa native Detective Armstrong. Or maybe it’s the missing ten-year-old girl, or the unidentified torso dumped in an alley behind a motel, or what looks like corruption deep within the police force. Bergeron and Armstrong are two of the cops poking around Sharon MacDonald’s place. They want to know whether the Arab-looking dead guy jumped, or if he was pushed. When it turns out he’s got no ID, no one knows him, and a couple of the 9/11 terrorists once lived in the building, they dig deeper, trying to make connections all over the new Toronto, in the Asian massage parlours, the street-dealer-led housing projects, and the mafia-run private clubs. Or maybe they’ll just stay close to Sharon. She knows what everybody knows. The whole world might be coming here, but this is nowhere.

  • Anazan
A shocking opening sets the stage for a fast-paced noir thriller that marries powerful drug cartels with international biker gangs enjoying unfettered opportunity in Toronto, where supply and demand drive an insatiable market. In McFetridge's thriller, the characters are colorful, the city teeming with thugs, drugs and a sophisticated market that has long since transcended independent biker gangs and an infusion of mob money, more sophisticated and creative as the times require. From the first chapter, when an Iranian plunges to his death from twenty-five stories, landing gracelessly on the windshield of an SUV parked in an alley, the surprised occupants' business transaction abruptly curtailed, cops quickly swarming over the scene, it is clear this city is in the throes of free enterprise gone wild. Watching the action from her apartment in the building, ex-stripper, self-employed weed entrepreneur Sharon Macdonald worries that her top floor grow rooms may be compromised by the enterprising detectives. She's right.

Although it takes a while before the dead man is identified, the detectives have not only spotted Sharon's enterprise, but are carefully monitoring increased suspicious activity by the cartel. It's in the air: something is going down. Recently returned to work after bereavement leave, Gord Bergeron is adapting to a new partner, the sharp-dressing, handsome Armstrong, the detectives called from the scene to aid in a search for a missing girl, later puzzling over their next call, a torso found in an alley; the partners rendezvous with their fellow officers, discussing the uneasiness in the streets and how much corruption may have tainted the department. With so much money available, temptation is unavoidable. Indeed, the cops are right, a move is in the works, but even Sharon, with her inside connections, cannot guess the extent of the coming changes. Her supply currently unavailable, Sharon meets with Ray, a new guy in town, who promises an outrageous supply, his presence sure to attract the notice of the ruthless bikers-cum-businessmen who control Toronto's drug market.

From earnest cops to petty hustlers, stone killers to undercover narcs, crime proceeds unimpeded by an overworked force, Toronto is a cornucopia of opportunity. A formerly loose confederation of independent operators has morphed into an organization that absorbs the opposition while disposing of any fools who get in the way. From detectives to crooks and all the players in between, the novel rocks from enforcement to violence, Sharon and her new friend small fry in the grand scheme of things, but determined to survive unscathed from the coming conflagration. Massage parlors, grow rooms, strip clubs, slums and gated condos compete for room in a city transformed by greed, corruption and mayhem, a few good men policing the mean streets in McFetridge's rollicking story. Luan Gaines/ 2008.
  • Olwado
Gord Bergeron is a detective in Toronto. He is back in the field after a period of desk duties when his wife was fighting an unsuccesful battle against cancer. Gord is given a young partner, Det. Armstrong.

Things happen quickly in this dialogue friendly story. A man falls or was pushed from the roof of a building, a 10 year old girl is abducted and rescued and drug deals are rampant.

Sharon MacDonald is a dealer and wants Richard Tremblay to front her 4 lbs of weed but he has a condition. There's a new competitor named Ray. He is offering a large quantity of weed and Richard wants to know if he's a cop. Richard thinks the deal that Ray is offering is too good to be true and wants Sharon to find out about him.

In the meanwhile, a group of bikers have taken control of the drug scene. Formerly in Montreal, they move the action to Toronto. Richard and his associates want to be in charge and increase the cost of the product.

Sharon and Ray become friendly and discuss partnering up and possibly moving away from Toronto. However, Richard has other ideas and murder is one of them.

There isn't much in the background of the characters except for Gord but their snappy dialogue zips across the pages and tells a pleasant story.
  • Faugami
McFetridge's first novel was really long but still very engaging, so the problem with this book is not his fault, I don't think. Sample of this particular book: Bergeron said to Cruikshank, “Whatever you can tell us will be greatly appreciated.†Then, walking away, he said to Armstrong, “You on the rag tonight, or what?†“What?†“Well, first Brewski.†Armstrong looked at the uniformed cop...

The funky characters are what I see in my kindle. This is unreadable.
  • Konetav
Why do writers and reviewers like Ken Bruen, Parnell Hall and others keep comparing literary crime writer John McFetridge to Elmore Leonard? Because McFetridge is the real deal. Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere, his latest novel, is tough, gritty, authentic, and peopled with characters who survive on quick wits and dark gallows humor on the mean streets of Toronto, one of North America's largest, most disfunctional cities. Once known as "Toronto, The Good," McFetridge has captured the darkest underbelly of "Toronto, The Bad," with the sharpest eye for location and character and the keenest ear for dialogue. Feeding off real life stories that have peppered the city's media for the past few years--from international biker wars and drug cartels, to an explosion of ethnic marijuana grow-ops, to the discovery of an unidentified headless, limbless corpse that recently turned up in a back alley garbage bin--McFetridge has packed it all into a taut, suspense filled mystery told through the eyes of a highly believable and enjoyable ensemble of straight and crooked cops; a down-on-his luck new guy in town with a sure-fire, get-rich-quick scheme that could get him killed; and a stripper playing footsy with a stranger who might be a hustler, a cop, or her best chance of surviving one more day in Nowhere. One of the best-ever openings for a crime novel. Congratulations, Mr. McFetridge.
Reviewed by Joseph Mark Glazner (AKA Shamus and Arthur Ellis Nominee Joseph Louis)
  • ACOS
I read about this novel and author on an international noir site and purchased the book. It is without a doubt the worst noir novel I have read. The plot is disjointed; the characters too numerous to keep track of; there is little if any character growth; and the ending is horrid. Save your money! Try Derek Raymond instead.