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Download Death in August: A Novel (Inspector Bordelli) eBook

by Marco Vichi

Download Death in August: A Novel (Inspector Bordelli) eBook
ISBN:
1605983519
Author:
Marco Vichi
Category:
Mystery
Language:
English
Publisher:
Pegasus Crime; Reprint edition (July 1, 2012)
Pages:
384 pages
EPUB book:
1406 kb
FB2 book:
1628 kb
DJVU:
1835 kb
Other formats
mbr lit rtf lit
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
448


Death in Florence: A Novel (Inspector Bordelli Mysteries) by Marco Vichi .

Only 6 left in stock (more on the way). Like Death in August, this book is character driven with Bordelli's angst about growing older and not being able to relate to the younger generation in 1965 Florence, playing a prominent part in the story. The reader gets very intimately connected to Bardelli observing all his obsessions, daydreams, recollections of war and cravings for cigarettes and women.

In this book the inspector is investigating a death that looks natural at first. Then came Marco Vichi's book, Death in August, which in Italian is titled simply Il Commissario Bordelli. Finally, an excellent story, well-written, with varied, intriguing characters and a solid plot. Very real: I suffered, along with Bordelli and the others, through the hot, heavy, humid days of August in Firenze.

Death in August: A Novel. Death in August - Marco Vichi. A new crime series full of Italian flavor-the first novel in the Inspector Bordelli series, set in 1960s Florence Florence, summer 1963. Inspector Bordelli is one of the few policemen left in the deserted city. He spends his days on routine work and his nights tormented by the heat and mosquitoes. Suddenly one night, a telephone call gives him a new sense of purpose: the suspected death of a wealthy signora. Bordelli rushes to her hilltop villa and picks the locks.

Books related to Death in Florence: A Novel (Inspector Bordelli Mysteries). Death and the Olive Grove.

Marco Vichi's novel Death in Florence won the Scerbanenco, Rieti, and Camaiore prizes. Start reading Death in Florence: A Novel (Inspector Bordelli Mysteries) on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Death in August is a book with an identity crisis: it is a psychological novel dressed up as a police procedural but .

Death in August is a book with an identity crisis: it is a psychological novel dressed up as a police procedural but marketed as a cozy mystery novel. The original Italian books, less bound by genre, have dark covers reflecting the dark themes in the series. Pretty much everyone has left town for the seaside, but someone has to man the store, so Bordelli stays behind.

It still wasn’t possible to park near home, as the wrecked cars and mountains of rubbish were still there.

It still wasn’t possible to park near home, as the wrecked cars and mountains of rubbish were still there trying not to look at Marianna’s legs. He reached his front door, lighting the way with his torch. As he climbed the stairs he imagined he would find Eleonora waiting for him in bed. She had the keys and could let herself in whenever she liked. He opened the door ever so slowly, peered through the crack, and saw only darkness

For crickets, it’s enough to have won on earth. Anonymous, 21st century

For crickets, it’s enough to have won on earth. Anonymous, 21st century. Florence, Summer 1963. Inspector Bordelli entered his office at eight o’clock in the morning after an almost sleepless night, spent tossing and turning between sweat-soaked sheets. These were the first days of August, hot and muggy, without a breath of wind. And the nights were even more humid and unhealthy.

Inspector Bordelli is one of the few policemen left in the deserted city. The old woman is lying on her bed-apparently killed by an asthma attack, though her medicine has been left untouched.

Death in Florence: A Novel (Inspector Bordelli Mysteries). The sequel to the critically acclaimed Death in August, which finds Inspector Bordelli facing a nightmarish murder mystery April 1964, and the cruelest month is breeding bad weather and worse news

Death in Florence: A Novel (Inspector Bordelli Mysteries). Florence, October 1966. When a young boy vanishes, the. The sequel to the critically acclaimed Death in August, which finds Inspector Bordelli facing a nightmarish murder mystery April 1964, and the cruelest month is breeding bad weather and worse news. And plenty of disturbing news is coming to Florence detective Inspector Bordelli. Bordelli’s friend, Casimiro, insists he’s discovered the body of a man in a field above Fiesole. Bordelli races to the scene,but doesn’t find any sign of a corpse. Only a couple of days later, a little girl is found at Villa Ventaglio.

A new crime series full of Italian flavor―the first novel in the Inspector Bordelli series, set in 1960s Florence.

Florence, summer 1963. Inspector Bordelli is one of the few policemen left in the deserted city. He spends his days on routine work and his nights tormented by the heat and mosquitoes.

Suddenly one night, a telephone call gives him a new sense of purpose: the suspected death of a wealthy signora. Bordelli rushes to her hilltop villa and picks the locks. The old woman is lying on her bed―apparently killed by an asthma attack, though her medicine has been left untouched.

With the help of his young protégé, the victim’s eccentric brother, and a semi-retired petty thief, the inspector begins a murder investigation. Each suspect has a solid alibi, but there is something that doesn't quite add up . . .

  • Stan
I have been a fan of Donna Leon's Italian crime series for over 10 years and have read every one. I love Guido Brunetti and his Venice. I so enjoy his musings on life, classical Roman authors, and of course - food.

Then about six months ago, I discovered the books of Andrea Camilleri's Inspector Montalbano of Sicily through Amazon Kindle's Book Bub emails. I had no idea that Italian crime fiction was a recognized genre! I devoured his first three books. Again the Detective Montalbano is not like any American detective I know of. He is a dark, irreverent rebel with a no-nonsense approach to life.

Now I have been introduced to Marco Vichi's Commisioner Bordelli books. I'm in heaven. Of the three detectives, Bordello takes the longest to finally solve the crime at hand, but he carries you along with him through every twist and diversion of his mind. None of the detectives here are positive thinking extroverts, in fact they all tend towards a deep thinking philosophy of life that makes their lives as homicide detectives more palatable to themselves and gives the reader a new respect for the thinking detective.

I'm beginning to wonder if senior Italian law enforcement officers truly are more humanistic, compassionate and introspective than their counterparts in other countries. It's a question of the chicken and the egg...has this genre emerged to document this uniquely Italian approach to catching criminals, or is it a question of "if the formula works, why mess with it?" I would really like to hear answers and opinions from my reading and writing colleagues about this question.

I also heard about another series skirting this genre where an American detective is working in Italy...here we go on a search again.

I highly recommend Death in August. Now that you know the underbelly of Venice and Sicily, make room for Florence!
  • IWantYou
Inspector Bordelli is a charmer. If he catches a robber in the act, he's more likely to give him a handout or find him a job than arrest him. Although grumpy and solitary, he longs for the love of a good woman, but at fifty-three he's probably waited to long to find her. The more eccentric and socially unacceptable a person is, the more likely Bordelli is to invite him to dinner. His compassion is delightfully indiscriminate.

In this book the inspector is investigating a death that looks natural at first. But there are small oddities about the old lady's bedroom that suggest otherwise. And her great wealth offers her greedy relatives a solid incentive to murder....

Bordelli is in poor shape throughout the investigation – struggling against his cigarette addiction, sleeping badly at night and falling asleep at odd moments on the job, daydreaming about women in his past, and sweating profusely in the record heat of August. There are wonderful descriptions of the brutal heat. And the mosquitoes in Florence also play their part in tormenting the inspector.

This book is full of delicious writing. I love the description of the cook at Bordelli's favorite trotteria: "four feet eleven inches of peasant joy." The story is rich in quick vivid characterizations like this.

This is 1963, and some of the characters, including Bordelli, relive scenes of the war against the Nazis in Italy. These recollections are vivid and give depth to the characters. Marco Vichi credits his father's war stories as his source material.

The murder has an exotic flavor, and the really fine writing adds immeasurably to the pleasure of seeing the mystery solved. Death in August is a book I'll pass on to friends – and I'll definitely be following the series.
  • Oreavi
I am a big fan of mysteries and police investigations taking place in countries other than the U.S. I have read all of Donna Leon's books featuring Commissario Guido Brunetti as well as Andrea Camilleri's books featuring the Sicilian police detective, Salvo Montalbano and, more recently, the books of Conor Fitzgerald who writes about Alec Blume, a police detective who is an American living in Rome. I like the flavor and the atmosphere of a foreign country, especially Italy (I am of Italian descent) and enjoy the ethnicity of the characters. This was the first book that I read by Marco Vichi and is the first in a series featuring Investigator Bordelli and I found it to be a good read. The story took place in 1960s Florence with the characters referring to World War II and thus there was a definite lack of modern technology that we now take for granted. The story was character rather than story driven with a cast that included the overheated Inspector Bordelli, thieves (some reformed and others not) an aging prostitute, an eccentric professor and many descriptions of Florence, food and wine. The mystery itself was simple, rather thin and almost secondary to the characters and their relationships to one another. I will definitely be buying the next book in the series for my Kindle.