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by Lawrence Block

Download The Burglar Who Liked to Quote Kipling eBook
ISBN:
1581650949
Author:
Lawrence Block
Category:
Mystery
Language:
English
Publisher:
Mystery Guild (1999)
EPUB book:
1497 kb
FB2 book:
1630 kb
DJVU:
1204 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
334


Home Lawrence Block The Burglar Who Liked to Quote Kipling. When from ’ouse to ’ouse you’re ’untin’ you must always work in pairs-.

Home Lawrence Block The Burglar Who Liked to Quote Kipling. The burglar who liked t. .The Burglar Who Liked to Quote Kipling, .

Start by marking The Burglar Who Liked to Quote Kipling (Bernie Rhodenbarr, as Want to Read .

Start by marking The Burglar Who Liked to Quote Kipling (Bernie Rhodenbarr, as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The book was written in 1979 so some of the prices of books are quite a bit dated, but Mr. Block's humor still stands up, especially humorous is the ongoing gag about a Pontiac the burglar steals to drive around the city. This is the third book in the series and can be read out of sequence without any major difficulty.

You could call it Burglar Books. These books are a steal’-there’s your slogan.

Lawrence Block The Burglar Who liked to Quote Kipling A book in the Bernie Rhodenbarr series for Cheryl Morrison When from ’ouse to ’ouse you’re ’untin’ you must always work in pairs- It ’alves the gain, but safer you will find- For a single man gets bottled on them twisty-wisty stairs. An’ a woman comes and clobs ’im from be’ind. You could call it Burglar Books.

Lawrence Block is the author of the popular series' featuring Bernie Rhodenbarr, Matthew Scudder, and Chip Harrison. Over 2 million copies of Lawrence Block's books are in print

Lawrence Block is the author of the popular series' featuring Bernie Rhodenbarr, Matthew Scudder, and Chip Harrison. Over 2 million copies of Lawrence Block's books are in print. He has published articles and short fiction in American Heritage, Redbook, Playboy, GQ, and The New York Times, and has published several collections of short fiction in book form, most recently Collected Mystery Stories. Block is a Grand Master of Mystery Writers of America. He has won the Edgar and Shamus awards four times, the Japanese Maltese Falcon award twice, as well as the Nero Wolfe award.

Author Lawrence Block. The Burglar Who Painted Like Mondrian. He set the book down next to the cash register, reached into a pocket, found two quarters, and placed them on the counter alongside the book. Author Lawrence Block. The Burglar Who Traded Ted Williams. Ah, poor Cowper, I said, picking up the book. Its binding was shaky, which was why it had found its way to my bargain table.

At a quarter to eleven I called the number on J. Rudyard Whelkin’s business card. I let it ring unheeded for a full minute, then dialed 411 for the number of the Martingale Club. those calls, and I could have taken a minute to look it up in the White Pages, but I’d earned a fortune the night before and I felt like sharing the wealth. The attendant at the Martingale Club said he didn’t believe Mr. Whelkin was on the premises but that he’d page him all the same. Time scuttled by. The attendant reported mournfully that Mr. Whelkin had not responded to the.

Lawrence Block (born June 24, 1938) is an American crime writer best known for two . The Burglar Who Liked to Quote Kipling (1979).

Lawrence Block (born June 24, 1938) is an American crime writer best known for two long-running New York–set series about the recovering alcoholic . Matthew Scudder and the gentleman burglar Bernie Rhodenbarr. Block was named a Grand Master by the Mystery Writers of America in 1994. Small Town (2003), Block's first non-series book in fifteen years, details a group of New Yorkers' varying responses to the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. Block has also written dozens of short stories over the years, and he is the only four-time winner of the Edgar Award for Best Short Story.

He set the book down next to the cash register, reached into a pocket, found two quarters, and placed them on the counter alongside the book. He shifted his weight from foot to foot while I scanned the table of contents. Here it is. Page one-fifty.

The Burglar Who liked to Quote Kipling. Report an error in the book. Bernie Rhodenbarr has gone legit - almost - as the new owner of a used bookstore in New York's Greenwich Village. Of course, dusty old tomes don't always turn a profit, so to make ends meet, Bernie's forced, on occasion, to indulge in his previous occupation: burglary. The heist goes off without a hitch.

Even Kipling thought so. Apparently Kipling thought it was so bad he had all copies destroyed before his death, all but one. This is the copy Bernie is hired to heist. All goes well til the Seihk, complete with turban, arrives at Bernie's Bookstore, relieves Bernie of the kipped Kipling, and things start going south faster than retirees to St. Petersburg in September.

  • Wiliniett
Poor Bernie! He's just a small business owner who indulges in a bit of burglary occasionally to improve his cash-flow situation and get the old adrenaline pumping. But when he tries to combine his two passions (books and burglary) be finds himself (and not for the first time) charged with murder. And it comes about (as it always does) because he breaks his own rule: never involve a third party in a burglary.

It's easy to see how he gets taken in. The very respectable gentleman with the faint English accent has such an excellent explanation about why he needs to hire Bernie to steal a one-of-a-kind book by Mr. Rudyard Kipling. The fact that the burglary involves stealing a car and going to the hinterlands (Queens, to give it a name) adds even more appeal to the proposition. Bernie loves a challenge. And $15,000 is (well) a lot of dough. And so the two book-lovers shake on the deal and the plot is off and running.

Sadly, this is yet another of those best-laid plans of mice and men that turns sour and soon Bernie is horrified to find himself at the end of a gun and (slightly later) awakening from a drugged stupor to discover that his hostess is now his late hostess. And his fingerprints are on the gun. And his wallet and ID are stashed under the sofa cushion. And, once more, our hero is on the lam and trying to solve a murder to keep from being convicted of it.

And there are mysterious Orientals and lazy, not-too-bright cops and Bernie's lesbian gal-pal Carolyn is introduced. She's a corker and features in many future books in this fine series. Bernie's romantic relationships tend to be turbulent and fleeting, but he knows a soul-mate when he sees one and he and Carolyn are a match made in heaven.

Watching this smart, funny, off-beat twosome solve a crime for the NYPD makes for a great read. This is the third in the series and I'll be reading all eleven of them.
  • Goldenfang
I can never decide who I love more, Bernie Rhodenbarr or his creator Lawrence Block. If you like your burglars semi-honest with a certain degree of self-control and (beginning with this volume) their own used bookstore and occasional lesbian dog-grooming tag-along accomplice, you'll be confused too.

New Bernie, Old Bernie, pre-bookstore, post-bookstore, with cat, or without, The Bernie books are my favorites of Lawrence Block's collection. That is unless I'm in the mood for something darker, then there's always three other heroes (or anti-heroes, depending on your frame of mind), but tonight I'm in the mood for something lighthearted and bright, so Bernie it is, sans cat, at least his own.

In The Burglar who Quoted Kipling, Bernie is made an offer he can't refuse, $15k to steal a volume of Kipling, the only remaining copy of the possibly worst Kipling Kipling ever wrote. Even Kipling thought so. Apparently Kipling thought it was so bad he had all copies destroyed before his death, all but one. This is the copy Bernie is hired to heist. All goes well til the Seihk, complete with turban, arrives at Bernie's Bookstore, relieves Bernie of the kipped Kipling, and things start going south faster than retirees to St. Petersburg in September.

Like I said, I'm not sure who I love more Larry for writing Bernie, or Bernie for being willing to go along with the stuff Larry comes up with, but they're both brilliant and intelligent at what they do and I'm sure you'll love them both as much as I.
  • Puchock
LB never disappoints... Hollywood, on the other hand, usually turns his treasures into trash, so pay no attention to the Scudder movie flop this year (the movie is more about guts and gore, than the intricately written characters we've come to love over the years), and please continue to forget the Whoopi Goldberg rendition of Bernie Rhondenbarr in the 80's and just buy every book LB has ever written about Bernie (11 and counting), Scudder, Keller, Harrison, or anything that bears the name Lawrence Block as author. I have collectible 1st edition hard covers of this series and paperback reading copies that I sometimes have to replace as they age, because I read LB's stories over and over. LB is the best author out there and this burglar is probably one of my favorite characters of all time.
  • black coffe
Bernie is growing on me. Didn't really care for his callous attitude towards victims in the previous books but I realized that he does carry some compassion. The writing is outstanding and the book is fast paced without losing you in momentum.
  • Urreur
For me the problem with the block books is the padding or the chit chat. Without that the books would be novella size or just short stories. But I like the burglar books more than the scudder books because they are lightweight with no alcoholic problems . The bookstore with information about books and readers is interesting. All of the plots are similar, but that doesn't bother me as it just makes the reading more familiar and more cozy. For me these books are in the cozy genre.
  • Elizabeth
I have read all of the Matthew Scuder and Keller series and maybe all of Tanner. All of these I really enjoyed and couldn't wait to finish. The Bernie Rhodenbarr series is not as appealing, because the plots are always (so far) the same premise - a corpse is found in an apartment that Bernie has burgled. But even a less than wonderful Block story is better than most anything else I've found. And the repartee with Carolyn is vintage Block.
  • Narder
The Grand Master is indeed a grand master. I read several of Block's books years ago but I am enjoying them all over again. Carolyn is especially intriguing. I have hopes for her and Bernie tripping and falling into bed whether drunk or cold stone sober. His friendship with Ray probably has given many law enforcement people great angst. That is if they read. They do read, do they not?