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Download Last Ditch eBook

by Ngaio Marsh

Download Last Ditch eBook
ISBN:
0006512291
Author:
Ngaio Marsh
Category:
Mystery
Language:
English
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers Ltd (August 20, 2001)
Pages:
288 pages
EPUB book:
1827 kb
FB2 book:
1955 kb
DJVU:
1225 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
344


For the family at Walnut Tree Farm. Jasper,’ said his wife, ‘is a mathematician and is writing a book about the binomial theorem, but you musn’t say I said so because he doesn’t care to have it known

For the family at Walnut Tree Farm. Jasper,’ said his wife, ‘is a mathematician and is writing a book about the binomial theorem, but you musn’t say I said so because he doesn’t care to have it known. Selina, darling, one more face like that and out you go before the pudding, which is strawberries and cream. Selina, with the aid of her fingers, had dragged down the corners of her mouth, slitted her eyes and leered across the table at Miss Harkness.

In 2018, HarperCollins Publishers released Money in the Morgue by Ngaio Marsh and Stella Duffy. Grave Mistake (1978).

DBE. Ngaio Marsh, 1940s. In 2018, HarperCollins Publishers released Money in the Morgue by Ngaio Marsh and Stella Duffy. The book was started by Marsh during World War II but abandoned Theatre.

Only 11 left in stock (more on the way).

I look forward to catching up with Inspector Alleyn. 1977’s Last Ditch by Ngaio Marsh turns its focus to Ricky Alleyn, the son of Detective Superintendent Roderick Alleyn, as Ricky goes to the Channel Islands to immerse himself in his work in writing a novel.

She looked at him with contempt. He said to Mr Jones: ‘We met at luncheon up at L’Esperance. Mr Jones said in a tone of utter disgust. Mr Jones said in a tone of utter disgust arkness, ‘What the hell were you doing up there?’. Nothing,’ she mumbled. So I should bloody hope. Had they got some things of mine up there?’. He grunted and disappeared through a door at the far end of the room.

Narrated by Tim Bentinck. Rickie Alleyn, son of the famed detective Roderick Alleyn had taken to the peaceful Channel Island village of Deep Cove to write his book.

Ngaio Marsh Last Ditch 1: Deep Cove 2: Syd Jones’s Pad and Montjoy 3: The Gap 4: Intermission 5: Intermezzo with Storm 6: Morning at the Cove 7: Syd’s Pad Again 8: Night Watches 9: Storm Over. Ngaio Marsh Last Ditch. Young Roderick Alleyn (Ricky). Chief Superintendent Roderick Alleyn: his father. Troy Alleyn: his mother. Inspector Fox: his godfather.

A classic Ngaio Marsh novel. Young Rickie Alleyn had come to the Channel Islands to try to write, but village life was tedious – until he saw the stablehand in the ditch. Dead, it seemed, from an unlucky jump. It might have ended there had Rickie not noticed some strange and puzzling things. But Rickie’s father, Chief Superintendent Roderick Alleyn, had been discreetly summoned to the scene, and when Rickie disappeared, it was the last stra. ead on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere.

As particular about her horses as she was casual about her lovers, young Dulcie Harkness courted trouble - and found it in a lonely and dangerous jump. What will her death reveal?

As particular about her horses as she was casual about her lovers, young Dulcie Harkness courted trouble - and found it in a lonely and dangerous jump. What will her death reveal? Young Roderick Alleyn (Ricky) is the object of special interest.

A classic Ngaio Marsh novel Young Rickie Alleyn had come to the Channel Islands to try to write, but village life was tedious - until he saw the stablehand in the ditch. o read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Young Rickie Alleyn had come to the Channel Islands to try to write, but village life was tedious - until he saw the stablehand in the ditch. Dead, it seemed, from an unlucky jump. It might have ended there had Rickie not noticed some strange and puzzling things. But Rickie's father, Chief Superintendent Roderick Alleyn, had been discreetly summoned to the scene, and when Rickie disappeared, it was the last straw
  • Kagda
The victim, Dulcie Harkness, works at a riding stable and dies in a fall jumping a challenging ditch. She was a crude young lady who slept around energetically. Suspicious features at the scene of her “accident” bring Inspector Alleyn to this seaside town to investigate.

Meanwhile Alleyn’s son Ricky has a lodging in town where he is writing a novel. He was present at the riding stable the day Dulcie died, so he can give his father some valuable observations. The father-son relationship is rather charming, though I was sorry to have so much focus on Ricky rather than Alleyn. I’m nearing the end of the series, and I want as much Inspector Alleyn as I can get. But Ricky does have some misadventures, and this is exciting.

A frivolous young married woman provides a harmless flirtation for Ricky. The witty repartee in this social circle feels a bit dated.

The mystery solves itself in a surprising and dramatic manner.

I was delighted to find at the finish of this story a short write-up by Ngaio Marsh on how she conceived her suave gentleman detective.
  • Era
I love her stories that include the other Alleyn family members. Characters are finely drawn as usual and the description of the countryside almost make one feel as if you were there. I thought Julia Pharamond would have been a good drug lord /murderer but the person chosen actually tied
e up all the loose ends.
  • tamada
This is an interesting story that moves along well. I admit I was surprised at the guilty party revealed at the end but I guess I should not have been as there were hints throughout the book as to a possible motive.
  • Black_Hawk_Down.
As with all her books you just can't go wrong reading this one.
  • Malarad
excellent
  • Anarius
Good.
  • Fordredor
This is one of the very latest Marsh books, written in 1977. (43 years after her first book!)

The story centers around Ricky Alleyn, the son of Roderick and Agatha Troy. In this book, he is twenty-one and striking out on his own for the very first time. Despite the best effort of both parents to keep him away from the world of crime, Ricky gets drawn into a local murder. Although Roderick is eventually sent to help his son out, Ricky remains at the center of the piece.

I actually did not mind Ricky as the central character. He has some interesting tensions and I could have seen him go on in later works to follow in his father's footsteps despite the wishes of his parents. That said, these tensions are not well developed in Last Ditch and Ricky remains betwixt and between with Roderick still shouldering most of the responsibility for the crime.

It would also have been interesting to see an aging Roderick less able to cope with the modern world of drugs and promiscuity. But Alleyn seems surprisingly unchanged, despite having a 21 year old son. He adjusts to the junkies and smuggling with ease.

Unfortunately, the world of drugs and junkies described here fails to ring true. It reads like second-hand stereotype rather than something from reality.

All this makes it sound like a bad book. It is not. Particularly for Marsh fans, there are still those moments of brilliance that characterize so much of her work. Julia Pharamond is a brilliant character, for instance. Her dizzy complexity and cold kindness makes her a classic Marsh character. I would not begin here if you haven't read any other Marsh, but if you are already a fan I would not be afraid to pick it up either.
As of this date, the previous (three) reviews of the book seem to have been for one of the printed copies, not the audio copy which I heard. I have not read the book and cannot comment on how it reads. As an audio book, excising the technical problems I had, which have nothing to do with the reader (Nadia May, one of the names taken for audio work by British actress and TV personality,Nadia Sawalha), was a good mystery with an interesting cast of characters, given distinct voices and considerable appeal by the Reader. The details of the action have already been spelled out by Amazon and previous reviewers, but their reception to the book's content is difficult for me to reconcile with what I heard. To what extent this is a personal matter not a difference between reading a text and hearing a text performed, even though word for word a duplication of the text, I cannot say. There is probably research on this intriguing problem in the literature but I have no inclination to seek it out. Suffice it to say, that my recommendation, that it will probably be enjoyed by any Marsh fan and most detective story readers, is based on the audio edition alone.
I refrain from comment on various points made by reviews of the "reading" group except to suggest that placing the work of Dame Ngaio in the recently devised "cozy" category doesn't fit in with my conception of "cozy" (many series within which group I enjoy) or my conception of Marsh's books.